EHR and Health IT Consulting
35.9K views | +7 today
Follow
EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scoop.it!

Technology can get patients more involved or alienate them

Technology can get patients more involved or alienate them | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Technology can do a lot to improve care and boost efficiency at healthcare organizations. But if the right steps aren’t taken, it can also make patients feel alienated and ignored by their doctors.

 

Healthcare technology can go a long way to boosting the quality of care and increasing efficiency and performance. Most healthcare organizations seem to agree, as electronic health records (EHR) adoption rates continue to grow, especially among smaller physician practices.

However, as EHR and other health IT adoption quickly increases, it’s important for doctors, management and staff to consider how that technology will impact day-to-day interactions between doctors and patients.

If the proper precautions aren’t taken, technology can act as a wedge between doctors and other people, including nurses, other doctors and patients.

Limit interaction

While electronic systems make it easier for doctors to do their jobs, they also make it easier to do those jobs without interacting with anyone else. For example, tests and treatments can be ordered through the system, eliminating the need to speak with nurses or other doctors. That can take away valuable opportunities for those parties to share information.

Those systems can also make it too easy to copy and paste information between electronic files, Schumann ways. That can eliminate good chances to ask patients to offer more information or apply fresh thinking to a situation.

And, given all the information that’s available in an EHR system, some doctors may be tempted to make more eye contact with the computer screen than with the patient during a visit. Even if that doesn’t affect the quality of the care that’s given, it can have a serious negative impact on patient satisfaction.

Make sure technology doesn’t get in the way

Here are some steps organizations can take to make sure technology doesn’t get in the way of doctors’ relationships with patients and others:

  1. Organize workspaces properly – If doctors use desktop computers to access EHRs in exam rooms, make sure those stations are set up in a way that makes it easier for the doctor to face and look at the patient while working on the computer.
  2. Consider tablets for EHR viewing – Mobile devices such as tablet computers can also be used to access EHRs in a way that retains the same feel as working with a paper chart.
  3. Use technology to increase interaction – Doctors should look for times when they can use the technology they have available to educate patients and get them more involved in their own care. With the number of apps that are around today, doctors can have round the clock correspondence with patients which enables them to become more involved in their their treatment plan.
  4. Have doctors explain what’s happening – Making patients feel better about the change in doctor-patient interaction might be as simple as doctors explaining that although they’ll need to take time to type information into the EHR, they’re still listening. Also, when doctors do something on the computer, they can explain what they’re doing and how it’ll benefit the patient.
  5. Use social media to communicate with your patients – Blogs, websites and social media platforms give your facility the ability to get a large amount of information out to patients. Now instead of articles on how to cure ailments, you can write about how to prevent them.
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

How EHR is different from EMR?

How EHR is different from EMR? | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

EHR and EMR have been in our vocabulary for nearly 20 years. Since the 1990’s, clinical environments have increasingly relied on technology to function and improve patient care. Today, our methods are becoming incredibly sophisticated, particularly following the application of Stage 3 of Meaningful Use in 2016. Because of this, it’s important to take a look at a commonly misunderstood distinction: EHR (electronic health records) and EMR (electronic medical records).

 

The Basics of EHR vs EMR

Back in 1995, one could arguably use EHR or EMR interchangeably. This is because electronic medical records systems were just that: an electronic version of the medical chart. But as the years have gone by, our technological functionality became more robust, stretching far beyond the exam room or even the clinical setting. In fact, it’s very common now for the patient to have access to their own records, physician communication, and more all from within their home.

It is for this reason that the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) has made a detailed study on EHR vs EMR.

 

How Records Systems Affect Different Parties

One way to better understand records systems in healthcare is to consider how those systems affect different parties. Let’s take a look at EHR vs EMR systems in terms of three different major parties in healthcare.

 

Patients  Improving patient outcomes is one of the largest and most important objectives of healthcare records systems. Patients rarely cross paths with EMRs. However, they are affected by them through follow-up exams, regular checkups, and other indicators over time. EHR systems, on the other hand, enable the patient to view their health reports, contact their healthcare providers, view referrals, pay their bills, and much more.

 

Providers  For providers, records systems not only help to improve patient care through improved data accuracy and alerts such as medication contradictions, but they also help to close gaps in communication and improve clinical workflow efficiency. This is true for both EHRs and EMRs, but the advantage an EHR has over an EMR for physicians is its ability to communicate information beyond the practice to patients, specialists, hospitals, and more. EHRs “move with the patient,” as explained by the ONC, as opposed to staying solely inside the walls of one practice.

 

Vendors  While vendors are responsible for providing a health records system, requirements for those systems can change over time, especially for certified EHR technology. EMRs are no longer sufficient to support a medical practice and its patients. Instead, EHR systems enable vendors to offer comprehensive, customizable services to medical practices that include everything from billing, to charting, to scheduling, and more, all while staying abreast of federal requirements like HIPAA and Meaningful Use regulations.

 

In the end, EHR systems are a direct reflection of how far technological advancements have taken the industry of records systems in healthcare. What once was simply an electronic version of a chart has become a real-time reflection of a patient and their health. This makes an EHR more powerful to the benefit of all parties involved, but in particular, to the patient.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.