EHR and Health IT Consulting
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EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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How EHR is different from EMR?

How EHR is different from EMR? | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

EHR and EMR have been in our vocabulary for nearly 20 years. Since the 1990’s, clinical environments have increasingly relied on technology to function and improve patient care. Today, our methods are becoming incredibly sophisticated, particularly following the application of Stage 3 of Meaningful Use in 2016. Because of this, it’s important to take a look at a commonly misunderstood distinction: EHR (electronic health records) and EMR (electronic medical records).

 

The Basics of EHR vs EMR

Back in 1995, one could arguably use EHR or EMR interchangeably. This is because electronic medical records systems were just that: an electronic version of the medical chart. But as the years have gone by, our technological functionality became more robust, stretching far beyond the exam room or even the clinical setting. In fact, it’s very common now for the patient to have access to their own records, physician communication, and more all from within their home.

It is for this reason that the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) has made a detailed study on EHR vs EMR.

 

How Records Systems Affect Different Parties

One way to better understand records systems in healthcare is to consider how those systems affect different parties. Let’s take a look at EHR vs EMR systems in terms of three different major parties in healthcare.

 

Patients  Improving patient outcomes is one of the largest and most important objectives of healthcare records systems. Patients rarely cross paths with EMRs. However, they are affected by them through follow-up exams, regular checkups, and other indicators over time. EHR systems, on the other hand, enable the patient to view their health reports, contact their healthcare providers, view referrals, pay their bills, and much more.

 

Providers  For providers, records systems not only help to improve patient care through improved data accuracy and alerts such as medication contradictions, but they also help to close gaps in communication and improve clinical workflow efficiency. This is true for both EHRs and EMRs, but the advantage an EHR has over an EMR for physicians is its ability to communicate information beyond the practice to patients, specialists, hospitals, and more. EHRs “move with the patient,” as explained by the ONC, as opposed to staying solely inside the walls of one practice.

 

Vendors  While vendors are responsible for providing a health records system, requirements for those systems can change over time, especially for certified EHR technology. EMRs are no longer sufficient to support a medical practice and its patients. Instead, EHR systems enable vendors to offer comprehensive, customizable services to medical practices that include everything from billing, to charting, to scheduling, and more, all while staying abreast of federal requirements like HIPAA and Meaningful Use regulations.

 

In the end, EHR systems are a direct reflection of how far technological advancements have taken the industry of records systems in healthcare. What once was simply an electronic version of a chart has become a real-time reflection of a patient and their health. This makes an EHR more powerful to the benefit of all parties involved, but in particular, to the patient.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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The Changing Healthcare IT Consulting Landscape

The Changing Healthcare IT Consulting Landscape | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

The last several years of healthcare IT consulting, specifically around EHR implementations, has been busy and fruitful. For a period of time there, it seemed that anyone who could both breathe and type would be hired on, trained, and thrown into the fire, working at a feverous pace to digitize our Nation’s medical records. Largely, this onslaught was driven by the financial incentives of Meaningful Use – get up on an approved medical record system, hit specific targets, by specific dates, and reap large financial rewards. The incentives were highly effective and as a result the vast majority of US hospitals are now utilizing some form of electronic health record solution. But there is a murmur out there: “what’s next?”

To begin, two significant dates come to mind. The first date was May 25, 1961, when President Kennedy committed to having a man on the moon by end of the decade. To many it was an impossible goal. Something that seemed so absurd considering we had only just witnessed the first American to orbit the Earth some 20 days prior. The next 8 years were filled with collaboration, heavy investments, long hours, and much ingenuity, which all culminated to the first human to walk on the moon on July 20, 1969.

 

The second date was January 20, 2004, when President Bush, during his State of the Union address, announced his vision for the majority of American enjoying the benefits of computerized medical records within 10 years. Here we are, 10 years later, and the majority of Americans are provided care at a facility that utilizes an Electronic Health Record. The parallels between the two announcements and efforts are apparent – unbelievable amounts of money were invested and an innumerable number of people were involved in realizing the vision, similar amounts of time were allotted, and both meant accomplishing something that seemed impossible. In both cases we were successful. We successfully landed on the moon by the end of the 60’s and today the majority of Americans are provided care at a facility that utilizes an EHR.

 

We’ve accomplished what we’ve set out to do. Sure, not all facilities are utilizing an EHR yet, and not all that are using an EHR are yet meeting “meaningful use guidelines”, but for the most part, the big push is complete. The big question that looms is: what’s next? And this question is one that riles many who were involved in this great undertaking. It’s alarming and concerning to know that what you’ve become accustomed to will be changing – demands of great effort and great ingenuity working tirelessly to discuss, plan, build, configure, test, train, implement, and support, and then repeat and repeat again – this will be changing. But this is the nature of IT. Without successfully completing our mission, would be akin to Neil Armstrong not taking the first step onto the Moon. But as with NASA, that first step wasn’t the last one either, but the beginning of what would become its greatest era with the likes of the Hubble Space Telescope, Space Shuttle, and Rover programs.

 

I believe that this is just the beginning of a more exciting time for healthcare IT. That the real bread and butter, the real pleasure from the work we do, and the real benefit to patients is just beginning. Now that the majority are utilizing an EHR, we can now leverage the efforts and investments through optimization, integration, and interoperability. Through optimization, we can make the experience more effective for both the clinician and the patient. Through integration with other health software, we can extend the capabilities of the EHR further using the EHR as the jumping off point. And through interoperability it’s easier to share patient information when it’s needed the most; no more burning CDs with images or faxing results.

 

About the only tangible benefit of utilizing an EHR over a paper based documentation system is legibility; it’s not having an EHR that matters, rather it’s how the digital bits of information are used and leveraged that makes the difference. Walking on the moon did very little for us, it’s what it took to get there, what it represented, and its ability to make us realize our potential that mattered most.

It’s important that we never stop progressing, that we never settle down and accept status quo. We must continue to innovate.

 

Moving to an EHR from a paper based documentation system should never be the end goal but rather the means to getting there. As a healthcare IT professional, your continued success will be in driving this progress forward. Continuing to look for opportunities – by recognizing issues when they present themselves and developing solutions, continuing to develop yourself through continuing education and certifications, and networking with other professionals. The possibilities are endless really, and now is the time when we get to see the real benefit of this investment. Now is the time for leverage.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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