EHR and Health IT Consulting
35.5K views | +9 today
Follow
EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scoop.it!

Measure Your Medical Practice Staff Tech Skills

Measure Your Medical Practice Staff Tech Skills | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Before you begin training staff to use a new EHR or practice management system, it's a good idea to assess their overall comfort level and experience with using technology. Staff members with low computer literacy should receive basic skills training so they can take full advantage of vendor training during implementation. Without that foundation, they may feel lost and never achieve true proficiency with the new system, experts say. Here is a basic skills assessment survey recommended by CMS. Employees are instructed to indicate how familiar they are with various tasks or skills on a scale from 1 (no experience) to 5 (very comfortable).


Desktop skills:

• Safely turn computer on and off

• Restart your computer if it becomes locked

• Open a program using the Start menu

• Name the basic computer system parts

• Explain the terms: icon, menu, window, click, select, drag

• Use scroll bars and move, resize, and close windows

• Use help screens in the software programs

• Navigate among folders, create, name, and delete folders

• Copy or move a file from one folder to another

• Cut or copy and paste text


Internet skills

• Use a Web browser

• Recognize a URL

• Explain the terms ISP, website, home page, search engine

• Type a URL in an open box

• Use back and forward buttons to move through Web pages

• Create a bookmark

• Locate and click on links

• Use a search engine

• Print a Web page

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

As Health Apps Hop On The Apple Watch, Privacy Will Be Key

As Health Apps Hop On The Apple Watch, Privacy Will Be Key | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

One day soon, you may be waiting in line for a coffee, eyeing a pastry, when your smart watch buzzes with a warning.


Flashing on the tiny screen of your Apple Watch is a message from an app called Lark, suggesting that you lay off the carbs for today. Speak into the Apple Watch's built-in mic about your food,sleep and exercise, and the app will send helpful tips back to you.


The notion of receiving nutrition advice from artificial intelligence on your wrist may seem like science fiction. But health developers like Lark are making a bet that Apple's first wearable device, the Apple Watch, will fly off the shelves and this kind of behavior will become the norm.

Lark is just one of over a dozen health developers with new apps for the Apple Watch, which ships to consumers this week. These apps range from medication management to a button that provides instant, virtual access to a doctor.


Apple has made no secret of its health and fitness plans for the Apple Watch. And in recent months, it has recruited medical experts to work on services like ResearchKit and HealthKit, which aim to open up the flow of health data between consumers, mobile developers and medical researchers.


But is Apple doing enough to protect the privacy of your sensitive health data?


In advance of the Apple Watch's release, the company has taken some steps to put you in control of how your data is shared. You can choose to share health information with third-party apps like Lark via Apple's Health app, which comes with the device. Your health data, collected via the Apple Watch or the iPhone, is stored on Apple's HealthKit.

"Apple is leaving your HealthKit data on the device and not collecting it," said Morgan Reed, executive director at The App Association, a Washington, D.C., nonprofit that works with patient advocates and app developers.


According to Reed, this prevents third-party app developers from selling your health data without your consent.

"It also means that if an employer wants access to your health care information, they would have to demand that you give it to them," he said.


But it's still early days for the Apple Watch, and it remains to be seen whether health developers will follow Apple's privacy guidelines.

"We haven't had a developer ecosystem for a product like a smart watch," said Ben Bajarin, who specializes in consumer technology for Creative Strategies, a consulting firm. "This is [uncharted] territory."

A Message On The Wrist


Health app developers hope the Apple Watch will improve how doctors and patients communicate.


Imagine a doctor receiving a buzz on the wrist for an e-prescription request, which could be approved with a few taps. A patient could receive a similar alert when test results are available.


Developers are exploring these possibilities and more.

"We are predisposed to small changes on the skin. It was not that long ago — and is still the case in parts of the world — that mosquitoes used to kill us with a light touch," said Ron Gutman, chief executive of HealthTap, a website and mobile app for secure video calls with a doctor.


"It is so easy to turn off a notification from a website, but you can't ignore what's on your wrist," he said.


Gutman was so intrigued by Apple's smart watch that he developed three apps: one to help you manage your meds; another that connects you to a doctor with the touch of a button; and a third, which helps physicians reach new patients.


"Be prepared to take charge of your health information, and feel free to say no to sharing data with apps."

- Morgan Reed, executive director at The App Association

Managing Medications


For patients who are juggling a variety of meds — all with different dose requirements — an Apple Watch app that sends alerts to the wrist could prove useful.


WebMD, used by millions of people to check their medical symptoms, tossed around a bunch of ideas before settling on medication adherence.


"All we wanted is for the user to be reminded that it's time to take their medication, and then quickly tell us whether they plan to take it or skip it or snooze," said Ben Greenberg, who heads up WebMD's mobile products. "That interaction demands so little." The app also instructs people whether to take their medication with food, or at a certain time of day.


Other companies that are developing medication adherence apps for the Apple Watch include MangoHealth, which can also tell you how well you've managed your prescriptions over time, and pharmacy giant Walgreens.


Appealing To Doctors


Some app developers hope that doctors will flock to buy the Apple Watch to help them manage an overload of patient information.

"Doctors are finally getting amazing hardware that just works, and they're willing to pay a premium for it," said Daniel Kivatinos, cofounder of Drchrono, an electronic medical record company.


Using Drchrono's app for the watch, a doctor can receive alerts, such as when a patient has arrived at their office.

The watch could prove useful in helping doctors communicate with each other about tricky medical cases. Doximity, the Facebook for doctors, has developed a secure app that care providers can use to dictate notes, send messages and receive notifications that a fax has arrived.


But the Apple Watch's appeal may be limited to certain specialties, such as family physicians and dermatologists. Surgeons routinely remove their rings and watches before procedures, to ensure their hands stay sterile.


Moreover, doctors will need to do the work to ensure that apps they use are taking adequate steps to protect patient data. Apps may say that they are meeting privacy requirements, but most aren't properly vetted. The government has long been concerned about the proliferation of mobile health apps that make false or misleading medical claims.


Opportunities And Challenges


Privacy experts and policymakers have been worried about developers that collect and sell personal health information.


The U.S. Federal Trade Commission concluded in a recent study that developers of 12 mobile health and fitness apps were sharing user information with 76 different parties, such as advertisers.

Apple has responded to some of these fears by barring developers from selling health data that it collects via Apple devices to advertisers. After some high-profile hacks to celebrities' accounts, Apple also forbade developers to store sensitive health information in iCloud.

"Apple has clear privacy rules, but consumers should still be on guard," said Reed from the App Association. "Be prepared to take charge of your health information, and feel free to say no to sharing data with apps."


more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Keeping Up With Technology: A Must for Medical Practices

Keeping Up With Technology: A Must for Medical Practices | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Still carrying around that BlackBerry you've had for the last five years? Still using Microsoft 2003 on that XP machine of yours? Still think the "cloud" is a fad? You might be doing yourself and your business a disservice if you answered "yes" to one or more of those questions.

Keeping up with the ever-changing world of technology is tough. Change can be hard. It's much easier to keep the status quo and ignore all the technological advances happening around you. The problem is, if you don't adapt and keep up with technology, you'll miss out on all the advancements and benefits it has to offer.

That trusty BlackBerry took too long to embrace touch-screen technology and missed out on creating a robust app store. The result is you can't check into your American Airlines flight on your phone, you can't use Hailo to get a cab, you can't access your Google Drive documents, and you can forget about looking up restaurant reviews on Yelp. Basically, even though switching to an Android or iOS device may be inconvenient in the short-run, the long-term benefits are well worth it. You'll have to learn how to use a new tool but that took has far more uses.

Technology in the workplace can mean the difference between a successful business and a failing business. Capable hardware and efficient software will keep your office running in tip-top condition and will allow your employees to focus on their jobs instead of troubleshooting their computers.

Look into Web-based programs that can be accessed remotely and that have export features that allow you to easily extract the data you need. Productivity suites like Google Documents are free and offer a comparable experience to the costly Microsoft Office standard (Google documents are compatible with MS Word). If you have to use Microsoft Office, don't skip on more than one major update. The difference between Word 2007 and Word 2010 is probably greater than you think.

The anxiety in introducing new technology to your office staff lies in the assumption that each employee has a different adoption threshold; some will "get it" and others will struggle. That's not as big of a hurdle as it's been in the past, as technology has become more uniform. Most people have a smartphone of some design, and many have households with smart TVs, multiple computers, and other universal technologies. Like all things, it may take a day or two for your staff to become comfortable with the new work flow, but your bottom line...and talent pool...will appreciate it.

In summary, don't be afraid to try new technology. If there's a hot new device or productivity program, there's probably a reason for it being so popular. Don't turn your practice into a technological ghost-town. Think about what your competition is doing.

In regards to technology, it’s good to be a leader and it’s also good to be a follower ... just make sure you’re one of them versus neither of them.


more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

IBM and Epic Prep for Multi Billion Dollar DoD EHR Contract | Hospital EMR and EHR

IBM and Epic Prep for Multi Billion Dollar DoD EHR Contract | Hospital EMR and EHR | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

In this recent Nextgov article, they talk about what Team IBM/Epic are doing to prepare for the massive bid:

On Wednesday, IBM and Epic raised the bar in their bidding strategy, announcing the formation of an advisory group of leading experts in large, successful EHR integrations to advise the companies on how to manage the overhaul — if they should win the contract, of course.

The advisory group’s creation was included as part of IBM and Epic’s bid package, according to Andy Maner, managing partner for IBM’s federal practice.

In a press briefing at IBM’s Washington, D.C., offices, Maner emphasized the importance of soliciting advice and insight from the group. Members of the advisory board include health care organizations, such as the American Medical Informatics Association, Duke University Health System and School of Medicine, Mercy Health, Sentara Healthcare and the Yale-New Haven Hospital.

Add this new advisory group to the report that Epic and IBM set up a DoD hardened Epic implementation environment and you can see how seriously they’re taking their bid. Here’s a short quote from that report:

Epic President Carl Dvorak explained the early move will also help test the performance of an Epic system on a data center and network that meets Defense Information Systems Agency guidelines for security. An IBM spokesperson told FCW that testing on the Epic system has been ongoing since November 2014.

As we noted in our last article, 2015’s going to be an exciting year for EHR as this $11+ billion EHR contract gets handed out. What do you think of Team IBM/Epic’s chances?



more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Why So Many New Tech Companies Are Getting into Health Care - HBR

Why So Many New Tech Companies Are Getting into Health Care - HBR | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

A flood of new health care IT companies has been pouring into the U.S. health care market. The cause of this torrent: the recognition that as market and regulatory forces alter incentives in health care, IT companies will play a powerful role in combating the overemployment and declining productivity that has plagued this industry and in helping providers improve the quality of care.

The dam broke in September 2007, when Athenahealth went public, the price of its shares jumping by 97% on the first day. Since then, the company’s value has risen to $5 billion. Athenahealth proved to entrepreneurs, software engineers, and investors that the health care sector is fertile ground for creating large technology-services companies that use a subscription-based business model to offer software as a service (SaaS).

Despite its size and growth rate, the health care sector was long considered an impenetrable, or at least an unattractive, target for IT innovation — the entrepreneurial equivalent of Siberia. Athenahealth broke the ice by proving that it could sell SaaS efficiently to small physician businesses, get doctors to accept off-premises software, and achieve the ratios of customer-acquisition costs to long-term value that other sectors already enjoy.

As Athenahealth accomplished its goals, several larger forces have dramatically widened the scope of opportunity in the sector:

  • The Great Recession led to a loss of 8.8 million U.S. jobs and big declines in demand throughout the economy (including health care services) — yet health care employment grew by 7.2%. That reality increased awareness that a decline in labor productivity was driving much of the excessive spending in health care.
  • The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 included the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, a $25.9 billion program to give doctors and hospitals incentives to adopt electronic health records. EHR adoption has now grown to nearly 80% of office-based physicians and 60% of hospitals, fueling many successful software start-ups, such as ZocDoc, Health Catalyst, and Practice Fusion.
  • The Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires that an enormous amount of data on cost and quality be made freely available. In addition, digital health applications, mobile phones, and wearable sensors, as well as breakthroughs in genomics, are creating truly big data sets in health care. These data contribute to greater market efficiency, more consumer-oriented products and services, and clinical care that is evidence-based and personalized.
  • The ACA has led to a proliferation of risk-based (rather than fee-for-service) payment models. For example, providers in accountable care organizations are rewarded for generating annual savings, and providers who use bundled payments get a fixed budget for an end-to-end course of treatment. Effectively responding to these changing economic incentives will increase reliance on software that helps providers manage population risk, understand costs and trends, and engage patients.

These macro-level developments set the stage for other SaaS companies to follow Athenahealth’s lead in enormously improving labor productivity and quality of care.


Within the next decade, software tools will eliminate thousands, perhaps millions, of jobs in hospitals, insurance companies, insurance brokerages, and human resources departments. Not the jobs of people who actually provide care — but those of administrative middlemen, whose dead weight contributes to economic loss. Here are five examples:

  1. Digital insurance markets, combined with ACA-enacted regulatory changes such as guaranteed issue and community rating, make it possible to price and sell health plans to anyone immediately. These developments will decimate the armies of brokers who act as intermediaries between customers and insurance services.
  1. Price transparency, digital insurance products, and tools such as reference pricing make it possible to generate an exact price and instantly collect payment for a health care service. As a result, revenue cycle managers in hospitals and claims adjudicators in insurance companies will be displaced.
  1. The inevitable shift to the cloud will render obsolete the costly, insecure data centers that most doctors and hospitals are now building, staffing, and running.
  1. Adopting self-serve mobile applications will eliminate the forms, faxes, and excess staffing at many call centers, thereby improving satisfaction for everyone in the process.
  1. Centralized clearinghouses that share information across organizations and state lines will eventually replace the byzantine, paper-based process of credentialing doctors, tracking continuing medical education, and keeping licenses up-to-date. That means smaller staffs in hospitals’ medical affairs divisions, health plans, medical boards, and state and local health departments.

Given that wages account for 56% of all health care spending, improvements in labor productivity could generate enormous value. Simply reducing administrative costs could yield an estimated $250 billion in savings per year.

As compelling as the prospective labor efficiencies are, the benefits of SaaS extend beyond direct labor costs. Easier access to data on physician quality, specialization, and adherence to evidence-based care will better match patients with doctors who provide high-quality, efficient services, thereby averting health complications for their patients. Moreover, software can help bring relevant clinical guidelines and personalized risk scores to patients and clinicians as they improve care plans, engage in shared decision making, and avoid duplicative services. Such efficiencies will, in turn, enhance how patients perceive and experience the care they receive. SaaS companies can trumpet all of these advantages, not just the employment savings they yield.

To seize on the new opportunities in the health care sector, SaaS companies can take these steps:

  • Attack economic inefficiencies in order to generate immediate, tangible customer return on investment. Witness how Castlight Health’s transparency tools are generating annual savings for employers and employees. And be clear about the source of the ROI, given that in most cases the revenue comes from another health care stakeholder who may be able to undermine the business.
  • Focus on building in network effects so that improvements made by one user enhance the product’s value for current and future users, just as Athenahealth does when it rapidly disseminates changes in payment rules at one provider to all other providers. Most SaaS businesses in health care IT cannot protect their intellectual property; so it is important to continually augment the value of the product to achieve scale.
  • Use software-enabled service models, rather than pure SaaS. For example, Grand Rounds’ software not only recommends an expert doctor for a patient but also collects, organizes, digitizes, and summarizes the patient’s records — and then books the appointment for the patient. In effect, the software makes it easier for patients to adhere to high-quality, cost-effective care, thereby enhancing the overall ROI for the product.

It took Athenahealth a decade, from 1997 to 2007, to go public on the strength of its SaaS model. It took Castlight Health only six years, from 2008 to 2014, to do the same. Now an array of highly valued healthcare SaaS companies, each worth more than $100 million, is emerging. They include Zenefits, Grand Rounds, Doctor on Demand, Omada Health, Health Catalyst, Doximity, and Evolent Health. Indeed, Zenefits is one of the fastest-growing SaaS companies ever, regardless of industry, surpassing $500 million in enterprise value in its first year.

The success of SaaS companies in health care is thanks, in part, to an influx of leaders from other sectors. They bring with them teams of technical talent that deliver consumer and enterprise software faster, better, and more cheaply than many legacy health care IT companies can do. Witness ZocDoc, founded by first-time entrepreneurs from McKinsey; Grand Rounds, founded by Owen Tripp, who cofounded Reputation.com; Zenefits, founded by Parker Conrad, who cofounded SigFig; and Doctor on Demand, founded by Adam Jackson, who cofounded Driverside (just to name a few). This type of cross-pollination is an essential ingredient of innovative change.

The barriers between health care IT companies and IT in other industries are clearly coming down, and we expect the number of sector disruptions and billion-dollar companies to swell. As each innovation wave generates more data, disruption-cycle times will shorten, thereby forcing all players in the health care ecosystem to address inefficiency as they compete on quality and value creation. Those who fail to act will be washed away by the tide that lifts all other boats to greater productivity.


more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

iPad & iPhone EHR Medical Records Apple Touch ID

iPad & iPhone EHR Medical Records Apple Touch ID | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Apple now introduced the biometric “Touch ID” onto the new iPad, latest iPad Air 2 and the iPad Mini 3.  Touch ID is also on the iPhone 5s, iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus.

What is Touch ID? Touch ID is a little biometric finger print reader on the new iOS devices:

  • iPad Air 2
  • iPad Mini 3
  • iPhone 5S
  • iPhone 6
  • iPhone 6 Plus

With Touch ID, you can now do more with just the touch of a finger, you can log in and verify identity in logging into apps. Touch ID is that little metal ring around the home button on the new iOS devices.

With the introduction of “Touch ID” onto the new iPad we have added something amazing. With three taps you can get into a medical record. You will touch once with Touch ID to get into the iPad, tap the drchrono EHR app, once the app is launched, then with Touch ID, get into their EHR. Only three taps, no typing a passcode.

This video show off Touch ID in action:

This feature was also added to the onpatient Personal Health Record.

This video shows off Touch ID on the PHR in action

 

The great thing about Touch ID is that it only takes a few minutes to setup. To setup Touch ID EHR follow this video, this video applies to all iOS devices with Touch ID, in the video I am showing how you can use an iPhone 6 to setup Touch ID EHR, it is the same for the new iPad Air 2 and iPad Mini 3:

I spoke about Touch ID a number of months ago, it is now a reality and changing the world.

The amazing thing about Touch ID is that people sometimes forget password and pin codes. This changes the game even more of touch technology in healthcare.



more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Drchrono uses Apple Touch ID to let doctors into electronic health record

Drchrono uses Apple Touch ID to let doctors into electronic health record | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Apple opened up the Touch ID fingerprint reader to third-party developers when it released iOS 8, and some in the health care world are beginning to take advantage of it.

Drchrono, which makes an electronic health record optimized for use on iPads, has now used that capability to authenticate doctors into the patient record — and to keep unauthorized users out.

This may be part of a wider push by Apple to get iPhone 6s and iPads into the tech arsenals of enterprises like large medical groups and hospitals. The new iPad Air 2 and the iPad Mini 3 now come with Touch ID, as do the iPhone 5s, iPhone 6, and iPhone 6 Plus.

Where the medical record is concerned, the Touch ID button could be hugely effective in providing secure yet easy access. For care providers using drchrono, three taps will get them into the medical record. They rest their finger on Touch ID to get into the iPad, tap the drchrono EHR app, and then, when the app is open, they hit Touch ID once more to get into the EHR. They no longer have to enter a passcode.

“The amazing thing about Touch ID is that people sometimes forget password and PIN codes,” Drchrono COO and cofounder Daniel Kivatinos wrote on the company’s blog. “This changes the game even more … touch technology in health care.”


more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Get Your Practice Rested and Ready for ICD-10

Get Your Practice Rested and Ready for ICD-10 | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Let's do a little thought experiment. It's Oct. 1, 2015. ICD-10 has gone live. What kind of shape are you in? Everyone on your staff has been trained, you've got some cash put aside or a line of credit to tide you over in case of delayed payments, your systems have been upgraded and tested.

What have you forgotten?


"No matter how well prepared you are,"  said Ken Bradley, vice president of strategic planning and regulatory compliance at medical claims clearinghouse Navicure, "the unexpected will happen, and perhaps the best thing you can do to be prepared for that is to make sure that come Oct. 1 you have all hands on deck and everyone is rested and ready."


Sounds simple enough, but like everything ICD-10, it's not something you want to put off until the last minute. A little strategic planning is called for to make sure your office isn't in a state of frantic exhaustion when the long-awaited day finally arrives and ICD-10 becomes a reality. Christine Lee, manager of provider practice services with Care Communications, a health information management consulting firm, offered a few tips to make sure your team is ready to go come Oct. 1.


• This fall is not a good time to schedule vacations. "Lots of vacations are happening around Labor Day and Thanksgiving, but some organizations have put a moratorium on off-time during the period surrounding the transition," said Lee. "You might want to consider doing that, too. Make sure everyone enjoys the summer and is ready to put their heads down and tackle ICD-10 come fall."


• Lee also advised making sure any pet projects are wrapped up and backlogs cleared up well before October. You obviously don't want to have the extra work overlapping with the ICD-10 transition, but you also don't want everyone exhausted from other projects either, so clear the decks in plenty of time to make sure you have a little calm before the ICD-10 storm.


• A key part of being "rested and ready" is being confident, said Lee. "If you can, bring in an outside speaker to motivate and encourage your team and perhaps … gauge how everyone is doing. You've trained and tested and tested and trained, but having someone from the outside bring in a few examples for your coders to work [with] can really increase their confidence. It's a way to say, 'Yes, you're really going to be able to do this.'" Lee did this with the coders at Care and was very pleased with the results.  "It really increased their confidence and took some of the pressure off. And if you do this and find that your coders aren't ready, you'll know in time to do some remedial work," she said.

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

drchrono preps EHR, PHR for Apple Watch

drchrono preps EHR, PHR for Apple Watch | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

The first developer to make an EHR exclusively for the iPad is now aiming to be the first choice for physicians and patients looking to make the most of their new Apple Watches.


When the Apple Watch first becomes available from select retailers April 24,  Mountain View, Calif.-based ambulatory EHR developer drchrono will be ready – just as is it was five years ago, when a newfangled contraption called the iPad first hit stores.


At HIMSS15 in Chicago this past week, Daniel Kivatinos, drchrono's co-founder and chief operating officer, demonstrated new software for the Apple Watch that had been in the works for months – since Apple first put out the software development kit for the device.


"The moment they release the SDK, we can build a simulator app, even though we don't actually have the physical hardware," said Kivatinos. "We did the same thing with the iPad: When we heard about the iPad in 2010, we downloaded the SDK prior to the actual hardware being released.


"The moment the physical hardware came out for the iPad, we released the app in the app store," he added. "Same situation here: The moment the physical hardware comes out, our app will be available."

Kivatinos says drchono plans to be among the first to offer an integrated EHR as soon as Apple Watch becomes available. He's excited about the device's potential to transform the office experience for doc early adopters, offering a new twist on real-time communication between physicians and their patients.


"We've thought about this a lot: What is our company, what do we do?" said Kivatinos. "Over the past several years we've realized we're creating wearable health records for doctors and patients."

With close to 70,000 physicians and more than 4 million patients registered on the drchrono platform, he said, both groups are poised to enjoy the benefits of this unique way of interaction.


"This is a completely new experience," he said. "For the first time, doctors are going to have information given to them with their hands free: A doctor could be administering a shot, picking up a child, moving an elderly person – looking at the information while doing whatever it is they need to do."


Likewise, said Kivatinos, patients should be drawn to experiencing their personal health records through a device on their wrists, using drchrono's app to schedule appointments, get medication reminders and manage their chronic diseases: "Apple creates a very nice experience for patients. It's not just about usability, it's about enjoyment."


The app will enable docs to view a patient information at a glance, respond to messages via quick text and see eRx refill requests – offering a wearable extension of the drchrono iPhone and iPad apps, according to drchrono.


"Doctors are incredibly busy; drchrono on Apple Watch gives them insights about their practice and patients just by checking their wrist," said CEO Michael Nusimow in a press statement. "Its simply amazing to have a hands-free way to gather quick insights about a patient."

Plenty of other vendors have already readied software for the Apple Watch's release, of course, and many of them were showcasing it at HIMSS15. Epic, Cerner, athenahealth, Vocera, Mayo Clinic and more all announced apps – or plans for apps – at the show.


Kivatinos said he's confident drchrono's early leadership among curious early adopters of Apple technology will keep them well-positioned among physician practices.


"If you look at the early days in 2010, we put our (iPad) app out the first week and had thousands and thousands of docs download it," he said. "It took some of our competitors years to get to that point."


Physicians "want innovation, but they want it to work," said Kivatinos. "We had one doctor who bought a $100,000 EHR, and came to us a week later and said, 'This doesn't work. What do you guys have?' He literally just junked it. If it doesn't work, they're just going to walk away."

The critical questions? "Is it usable, is it designed well, can I just put information into it and walk away quickly? Can I just do my rounds? I don't want this thing in my way."


The company touts different "modes" for the Apple Watch app, depending who's using it and how. "Glance" offers a quick view, giving docs a snapshot of their patient schedule for the day. "Short Look Notifications" can display brief messages generated from the EHR app. "Long Look Notifications" offer a doctor a view of the app itself.


Kivatinos says he's "100 percent" certain the Apple Watch is going to catch on in a big way among consumers – and his customers.

I wonder aloud whether the embrace might be more tepid – something akin to a new form factor such as Google Glass, which found limited acceptance among the general public, but is still enjoying innovative clinical use cases.


Kivatinos says he's convinced it's an Apple to oranges comparison. Glass, with its temple tapping and head nodding, necessitated a new and sometimes questionable type of social etiquette, he said. The "experience was a little different: harder to set things up and install," he said – to say nothing of the cost.


"I bought a Google Glass. It cost $2,000 with prescription lenses," he said. "$2,000 and $350 is a drastic difference. Price point is so critical."

Whether it's docs looking for easy access to vital signs, staff messaging, e-prescriptions and labs; or patients looking for an attractive and convenient interaction to manage their meds or schedule appointments, he's convinced the Apple Watch will find favor among folks and physicians alike.



"The interest is amazingly high," he said.


more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Apple's health tech takes early lead among top hospitals

Apple's health tech takes early lead among top hospitals | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Apple Inc's (AAPL.O) healthcare technology is spreading quickly among major U.S. hospitals, showing early promise as a way for doctors to monitor patients remotely and lower costs.

Fourteen of 23 top hospitals contacted by Reuters said they have rolled out a pilot program of Apple's HealthKit service - which acts as a repository for patient-generated health information like blood pressure, weight or heart rate - or are in talks to do so.

The pilots aim to help physicians monitor patients with such chronic conditions as diabetes and hypertension. Apple rivals Google Inc (GOOGL.O) and Samsung Electronics (005930.KS), which have released similar services, are only just starting to reach out to hospitals and other medical partners.

Such systems hold the promise of allowing doctors to watch for early signs of trouble and intervene before a medical problem becomes acute. That could help hospitals avoid repeat admissions, for which they are penalized under new U.S. government guidelines, all at a relatively low cost.

The U.S. healthcare market is $3 trillion, and researcher IDC Health Insights predicts that 70 percent of healthcare organizations worldwide will invest by 2018 in technology including apps, wearables, remote monitoring and virtual care.

Those trying out Apple's service included at least eight of the 17 hospitals on one list ranking the best hospitals, the U.S. News & World Report's Honor Roll. Google and Samsung had started discussions with just a few of these hospitals.

Apple's HealthKit works by gathering data from sources such as glucose measurement tools, food and exercise-tracking apps and Wi-fi connected scales. The company's Apple Watch, due for release in April, promises to add to the range of possible data, which with patients' consent can be sent to an electronic medical record for doctors to view.

"TIMING RIGHT"

Ochsner Medical Center in New Orleans has been working with Apple and Epic Systems, Ochsner's medical records vendor, to roll out a pilot program for high-risk patients. The team is already tracking several hundred patients who are struggling to control their blood pressure. The devices measure blood pressure and other statistics and send it to Apple phones and tablets.

"If we had more data, like daily weights, we could give the patient a call before they need to be hospitalized," said Chief Clinical Transformation Officer Dr. Richard Milani.

Sumit Rana, chief technology officer at Epic Systems, said the timing was right for mobile health tech to take off.

"We didn't have smartphones ten years ago; or an explosion of new sensors and devices," Rana said.

Apple has said that over 600 developers are integrating HealthKit into their health and fitness apps.

Many of the hospitals told Reuters they were eager to try pilots of the Google Fit service, since Google's Android software powers most smartphones. Google said it has several developer partners on board for Fit, which connects to apps and devices, but did not comment on its outreach to hospitals.

Samsung said it is working with Boston’s Massachusetts General Hospital to develop mobile health technology. The firm also has a relationship with the University of California's San Francisco Medical Center.

Apple's move into mobile health tech comes as the Affordable Care Act and other healthcare reform efforts aim to provide incentives for doctors to keep patients healthy. The aim is to move away from the "fee for service" model, which has tended to reward doctors for pricey procedures rather than for outcomes.

Still, hospitals must decide whether the difficulty of sorting through a deluge of patient-generated data of varying quality is worth the investment.

"This is a whole new data source that we don't understand the integrity of yet," said William Hanson, chief medical information officer at the University of Pennsylvania Health System.

FIRST STEPS

Apple has recruited informal industry advisors, including Rana and John Halamka, chief information officer of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, to discuss health data privacy and for introductions to the industry.

The company said it had an "incredible team" of experts in health and fitness and was talking to medical institutions, healthcare and industry experts on ways to deliver its services.

A few hospitals are also exploring how to manage the data that is flowing in from health and fitness-concerned patients, whom many in Silicon Valley refer to as the "worried well."

Beth Israel's Halamka said that many of the 250,000 patients in his system had data from sources such as Jawbone's Up activity tracker and wirelessly connected scales.

"Can I interface to every possible device that every patient uses? No. But Apple can,” he said.

Cedars-Sinai hospital in Los Angeles is developing visual dashboards to present patient-generated data to doctors in an easy-to-digest manner.

Experts say that there will eventually be a need for common standards to ensure that data can be gathered from both Apple's system and its competitors.

"How do we get Apple to work with Samsung? I think it will be a problem eventually," said Brian Carter, a director focused on personal and population health at Cerner, an electronic medical record vendor that is integrated with HealthKit.


more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Why Should Your Practice Have a Cloud-Based EHR? - HITECH AnswersHITECH Answers

Why Should Your Practice Have a Cloud-Based EHR? - HITECH AnswersHITECH Answers | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

If you’re still debating whether to go with a web-based EHR or a server-based EHR, you should know why a growing number of practices are choosing to go with a cloud EMR.

How does a web-based EMR differ from the older technology of a client server-based EHR system?

A cloud EMR is different (and better, in our opinion) due to the following factors:

Your software is always up to date
With a web-based EMR, the software is always up to date, usually at no additional charge. No more expensive upgrades causing delays; just open the SaaS-based software and you have the latest version.

Rest easy on HIPAA data requirements
Data security is much easier to manage with a web-based system. Cloud EHR vendors can provide much more security for your data than you can internally with office servers. As reported by the Business Insurance site, “Data breaches seem to be everywhere these days except the one place everyone fears—the cloud.” That could be because cloud EMRs offer financial-level security for your data.

Accessibility—work from anywhere
One of the things many users love about the cloud is the ability to work from anywhere—whether it’s e-prescribing from a smartphone or checking a patient record from the beach while on vacation. We don’t recommend you work on your vacation, but we understand the realities of medical practice.

Cloud-based EHR systems allow continued functioning during and immediately after disasters
Hospitals and physicians discovered the benefits of cloud-based data first after Hurricane Katrina and again after Super Storm Sandy; with a web-based system, you can practice (and bill) from anywhere.

Reduced expense for both software and hardware
A cloud-based system is more cost-effective, particularly for small to medium sized practices, since there are no large hardware expenditures and the software expense is a consistent, low subscription rate. You won’t have to plan for large hardware and software expenditures.

Better IT support
Damn it, Jim, you’re a doctor—not an IT person. And you will probably not be able to hire IT support of the same caliber as the staff of a web-based EHR vendor. Why not make use of their resources and eliminate your headaches?

You can use a cloud-based EHR on a mobile device such as an iPad or other tablet
A survey of physicians by web-based EHR review group Software Advice showed that 39% of physicians want to use their EHR on a tablet such as iPad, and in another survey, a majority of patient respondents indicated that they find use of an EHR on a tablet in the exam room to be “not at all bothersome.”

Satisfaction levels are higher among mobile EHR users
A recent survey by tablet-based EHR review group Software Advice found that providers using a mobile EHR expressed twice the satisfaction levels of those using EHRs via non-mobile systems. And as mentioned above, an effective mobile EHR needs to be cloud-based.

It’s particularly important to note that cloud-based systems are nearly always more secure than any system you could set up in your office. For most practices, data security and HIPAA best practices are not their area of expertise—excellent patient care is. But for cloud EMR systems, those areas are key to our success. We are better at it because we must be in order to continue in business. And as mentioned above, the proof is in the lack of data breaches among cloud-based companies.

One proof of the idea that a cloud-based EHR is the best choice is the fact that most EHRs that were originally server-based have since developed cloud-based offerings as well. If server-based technology is state of the art, why are those vendors switching platforms?


more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Keeping Up With Technology: A Must for Medical Practices | Physicians Practice

Keeping Up With Technology: A Must for Medical Practices | Physicians Practice | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it
Still carrying around that BlackBerry you've had for the last five years? Still using Microsoft 2003 on that XP machine of yours? Still think the "cloud" is a fad? You might be doing yourself and your business a disservice if you answered "yes" to one or more of those questions.

Keeping up with the ever-changing world of technology is tough. Change can be hard. It's much easier to keep the status quo and ignore all the technological advances happening around you. The problem is, if you don't adapt and keep up with technology, you'll miss out on all the advancements and benefits it has to offer.

That trusty BlackBerry took too long to embrace touch-screen technology and missed out on creating a robust app store. The result is you can't check into your American Airlines flight on your phone, you can't use Hailo to get a cab, you can't access your Google Drive documents, and you can forget about looking up restaurant reviews on Yelp. Basically, even though switching to an Android or iOS device may be inconvenient in the short-run, the long-term benefits are well worth it. You'll have to learn how to use a new tool but that took has far more uses.

Technology in the workplace can mean the difference between a successful business and a failing business. Capable hardware and efficient software will keep your office running in tip-top condition and will allow your employees to focus on their jobs instead of troubleshooting their computers.

Look into Web-based programs that can be accessed remotely and that have export features that allow you to easily extract the data you need. Productivity suites like Google Documents are free and offer a comparable experience to the costly Microsoft Office standard (Google documents are compatible with MS Word). If you have to use Microsoft Office, don't skip on more than one major update. The difference between Word 2007 and Word 2010 is probably greater than you think.

The anxiety in introducing new technology to your office staff lies in the assumption that each employee has a different adoption threshold; some will "get it" and others will struggle. That's not as big of a hurdle as it's been in the past, as technology has become more uniform. Most people have a smartphone of some design, and many have households with smart TVs, multiple computers, and other universal technologies. Like all things, it may take a day or two for your staff to become comfortable with the new work flow, but your bottom line...and talent pool...will appreciate it.

In summary, don't be afraid to try new technology. If there's a hot new device or productivity program, there's probably a reason for it being so popular. Don't turn your practice into a technological ghost-town. Think about what your competition is doing.

In regards to technology, it’s good to be a leader and it’s also good to be a follower ... just make sure you’re one of them versus neither of them.
more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

What Is A Medical Grade Computer? -

What Is A Medical Grade Computer? - | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Not all innovations lead to improved patient care or lower operating costs, but many of them do so your health care operations needs to stay current with the latest breakthroughs. This may require initial investments of money and training but the payoff can be worthwhile. Medical grade computers are a technology that can improve patient outcomes and make your practice more efficient.

Currently, there is no standard definition of a medical grade computer, but there are certain features to look for when selecting one for your health care setting. The first consideration is basic functionality. All medical grade computers need to be able to run 24/7 as healthcare never stops. Then, check to make sure that the computer supports HIPAA compliant electronic health record (EHR) practices and that it is compatible with your current operating system and software. Increasingly, medical facilities are requiring any electronic device used to carry certifications regarding electrical charge and flow from the device. Some of the common certifications desired are CE, FCC class A or B, EN60601-1 and UL60601-1. Finally, another component of a medical computer may be an anti-bacterial coating over the enclosure which helps cut down the spread of MRSA and other infections.

Use of Medical Grade Computers for EHR

Some physicians still hold out for paper health records, but EHRs are now the norm. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 includes provisions for financial incentives for Medicare providers who demonstrate meaningful use of technology for EHR by meeting Stage 1 and Stage 2 criteria.

Some benefits of storing patient records on medical grade computers include the following:

  • Complete set of records with no risk of paper loss of important data.
  • Accurate records with less chance for human error upon data entry or retrieval.
  • Less chance of conflicting treatments, such as drug interactions.
  • Faster diagnosis, since all information is available in the single patient file.
  • Easy and clear viewing of electronic imaging records such as Xrays and MRIs.

A good medical grade computer needs to quickly process complete patient health records to get through a patient visit in a timely manner. As patient privacy is becoming more of a concern, these computers must be able to maintain HIPAA compliance according to the HITECH Act within the ARRA of 2009. Look for a computer with the following characteristics:

  • Supports the operating system needed and patient record software.
  • Securely connects to a network to allow various medical providers, but no unauthorized users, to access patient records.
  • Can easily be backed up to prevent data loss.
  • Can have RFID reader or barcode scanner type attachments if needed for use in tracking treatment.

Surgical and Diagnostic Applications

Medical grade computers have the potential to assist in patient care because of imaging capabilities. For example, computers with the proper graphics processor, CPU performance, screen display, and software compatibility can visualize patients’ inner workings to guide surgeons during surgery. In diagnostics, computers display MRI and CT scans providing radiologists with critical information. New software and high definition screens enable a diagnostician to see better than before and more quickly detect what they are looking for.

Medical Computers provide a platform for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) files which can be used anywhere in the hospital to display medical images such as Ultrasounds and X-rays. This lets all members of the health care team access the information needed at the time they focus their attention on the patient to provide diagnostic and monitoring services. When looking for a medical grade computer, consider exactly what it will be used for to make sure you select one that supports the necessary operating system, visual display, and software needed.

Compatibility with Your Current Setup

Medical grade computers are a costly investment but do provide a high ROI (Return On Investment). Justification for allocating the money upfront includes the potential for better patient care, along with reduced operating costs due to greater efficiency. A good medical grade computer is compatible with your current technology network and software, as well as configurable for future applications.

Cleanliness for Your Health Care Environment

Computers and computer equipment may seem clean, but invisible bacteria can easily build up. Typical PCs are not sterile enough for a hospital or other health care environment where staying sanitized is a top priority. In fact, a standard home or office computer may have three times the number of germs as a toilet seat. A medical grade computer has features that promote hygiene such as the following.

  • Fanless design to prevent debris from building up in the fan.
  • A fully sealed enclosure, which is easy to clean with sanitizer without getting moisture inside.
  • An antimicrobial touchscreen and enclosure, which can prevent the spread of MRSA.
  • Fewer wires so the room remains easy to clean.

Medical grade computers are essential in modern health care settings to increase efficiency and support patient care. When you search for a medical grade computer, make sure it supports all the technical functions you need and contributes to a sanitary environment.



more...
No comment yet.