EHR and Health IT Consulting
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EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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Benefits of an EPCS Certified EHR

Benefits of an EPCS Certified EHR | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

In response to the nation’s climbing prescription drug abuse problem, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) finalized a rule in 2010, permitting electronic prescriptions for controlled substances (EPCS). Today, e-prescribing is legal in all 50 states, and becoming increasingly popular. According to SureScripts’ 2015 National Report, the number of e-prescriptions have doubled since 2012.

 

So why is EPCS becoming more and more of a standard practice? EPCS is a step in the right direction to fighting fraud and abuse of controlled substances and provides numerous benefits for physicians and their patients, outlined below.

 

Benefits of EPCS for Small Practices

  • Makes prescribing more efficient and secure - With EPCS, physicians can send prescriptions for patients directly to the pharmacy from within the EHR at the point of care, instead of having to handwrite a prescription that could potentially get lost or stolen or prompt a phone call from a pharmacist needing further clarification.

 

  • Reduces medication errors, fraud and abuse - By eliminating the need for paper prescription pads, EPCS ensures prescriptions are getting into the right hands. EPCS has also been proven to improve prescription accuracy by preventing drug to allergy interactions, incorrect dosing, illegible prescriptions, etc. With EPCS, long gone are the days pharmacies receive scripts they can’t read.

 

  • Added convenience and safety, for physicians and patients - With EPCS, physicians can confidently and seamlessly e-prescribe controlled substances to their patient’s pharmacy. EPCS ensures the prescription reaches the pharmacy and the patient can easily pick up their medication, also improving patient medication adherence.

 

EPCS has proven to be beneficial for physicians and although legal, EPCS has not been mandated nationwide with the exception of four states. The following have passed legislation, mandating electronic prescriptions for controlled substances:

 

  • Virginia
  • New York
  • Minnesota
  • Maine


Interested in EPCS?

Many small practices realize the benefits of EPCS and want to partake, even if not required by their state. To begin e-prescribing for controlled substances there are a few initial steps: (1) use an EPCS certified application (EPCS certified means the application has completed testing and certification through a third party auditor, required by the DEA) and (2) complete the provider authentication process.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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3 EHR Features to Improve the Patient Check-In Process

3 EHR Features to Improve the Patient Check-In Process | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

While the patient experience begins long before a patient steps into the examination room, it’s important to make a good impression the moment a patient steps through the doors of your medical practice. Starting off on the right foot during the check-in process can positively impact the patient experience and determine the pace of the patient visit.

There are many moving parts to an office visit that all demand attention. With the help of technology, patient check-in can be less of a burden for patients and staff. Here are a few EHR features your practice can use to improve patient check-in.

Patient Kiosk

One of the most popular features being used to improve patient check-in is kiosk. This technology is similar to what is used today at airports and fast-food chain restaurants. In a medical practice equipped with the Practice EHR kiosk, patients can check in on an iPad or tablet using interactive forms that guide them through the check-in process, collecting medical history info, patient information updates, signatures for consent forms and payment. Once the patient completes check-in, the information collected is automatically integrated into the EHR. Medical practices who implement a kiosk can reduce the resources required for check in at the front desk and improve efficiency.

Patient Portal

Medical practices looking for an alternative to the kiosk model can implement a patient portal. With a patient portal, patients provide information and complete forms online, prior to the visit, eliminating the need for paperwork when they arrive. Portals typically provide additional time-saving features, such as online scheduling, secure messaging and easy sharing of test results and medical information. Medical practices who’ve implemented portals are using them effectively to reduce costs and the amount of time it takes for a patient to check-in.

ID Scanner

An ID scanner will quickly become a favorite for your front desk staff. With this technology your practice can capture the front and back of patient cards and documents digitally in seconds, eliminating paper copies from the workflow. Medical practices who use ID scanners can significantly speed up the patient registration process. There are several ID scanners in the marketplace. However, Practice EHR is integrated with Ambir Technology, ensuring captured information gets populated automatically in the EHR.

As the healthcare industry shifts to a value-based and consumer-driven model, it’s important that medical practices review current processes and work to improve the patient experience 

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EHRs and the Problem of Efficiency

EHRs and the Problem of Efficiency | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Some doctors worry about how EHRs slow them down. I worry about how fast they let us go. Too much dropdown makes documentation too easy.

 

And when it comes to doctors and their EHRs, there’s a fine line between efficient and lazy.

 

Seeing the line is important because when it comes to workflow the drive to completion typically overpowers the obligation to showcase thinking and care. I know because I dance the line every day.

 

Four things I do to fight the downside of efficiency:

  1. Recognize that documentation is hard. Good clinical documentation takes work. When it becomes too easy I’ve typically crossed the line.
  2. Build narrative. My HPI and impressions represent an identifiable stream of thought. I don’t use smart phrases in my HPI or impression.
  3. Consider the end-user. How does what I create after a clinical encounter serve those who need to see my thinking?
  4. Stay aware. All of this is a struggle for me. But my discussion and thinking around this make me aware of it. And that’s the first step to staying on top of it.

 

All of this discussion is cause celebre for those interested in going back to manilla folders and clipboards. But don’t be fooled. Take any doctor from the analogue age, give him two glasses of wine and he’ll tell you it was easier to take shortcuts on paper. Illegibility and senseless scribbling was our analogue pulldown.

 

Perhaps most importantly, the problem of efficiency needs discussion among medical trainees who are preoccupied with the drive to completion.

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Practice EHR Success Story: Britt Larka, D.P.M

Practice EHR Success Story: Britt Larka, D.P.M | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Situation

 

As a solo podiatrist, Britt Larka, D.P.M struggled to find an electronic health record (EHR) system designed to meet the needs of her Houston-based practice. In an effort to find the right system for her practice, Dr. Larka implemented multiple EHR's, continually facing the same three challenges. With each new system, Dr. Larka experienced financial, workflow and operational challenges.

  • Financial - Implementation, training, etc., on top of system pricing, became a financial burden
  • Workflow - The EHR's were not made for a practice of her size and difficult to navigate
  • Operational - The EHR's were cumbersome,  negatively impacting patient care, day-to-day operations, and efficiency

Unsure where to turn next, Dr. Larka received a recommendation from her long-time billing services provider,  leading her to Practice EHR - an EHR with built-in specialty-specific content and a simple workflow designed for small practices. 

 

Results

  • Seamless implementation.  Implementing Practice EHR was a smooth process for Dr. Larka and her office staff. For all new clients, Practice EHR offers data migration, integration, training and customer support at no additional cost, easing the financial burden and the learning curve that small practices typically experience with an EHR implementation.

 

  • Improved efficiency of documentationAfter implementing Practice EHR, Dr. Larka and her team quickly appreciated the system’s easy-to-use and intuitive workflow. Practice EHR's ease of use enabled her team to work more efficiently. In addition, with built-in podiatry templates and clinical content, Dr. Larka could easily log patient care, allowing her to spend more face time with patients. 

 

  • Improved efficiency of billingDr. Larka’s staff improved practice management and efficiency with the help of Practice EHR’s electronic claim submission feature. With Practice, EHR encounters get sent electronically to billing providers from within our system, increasing efficiency for the staff and helping physicians get paid faster.


About Practice EHR

Practice EHR is a cloud-based and specialty-specific electronic health record (EHR) and practice management (PM) solution designed exclusively for small practices. We realize that a one-size-fits-all EHR isn’t right for all care settings, that’s why we designed Practice EHR to meet the needs of small practices and their specialty. Simplifying the entire documentation and billing process, Practice EHR helps more than 1,000 physicians in 23 different specialties deliver care while running a more profitable and efficient practice. Interested in learning more about Practice EHR? Request a Demo by clicking below and a member of our team will contact you.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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Practice EHR Success Story CareMed

Practice EHR Success Story CareMed | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Situation

CareMed is a multi-location practice offering a unique blend of primary care and urgent care to the Suffolk County of New York. After an increasing patient demand for access to convenient healthcare, CareMed expanded into a second location and realized the EHR system they had in place could no longer support the needs of their growing practice. To achieve long-term success, CareMed knew they needed to consider a more modern and comprehensive EHR solution with features designed to support a busy practice with multiple locations. 

Results

  • Decreased costs. Priced at only $149 per month, per provider, Practice EHR is one of the most affordable and cost-effective systems on the market. By switching to Practice EHR, CareMed decreased costs by 40 percent. For a growing practice like CareMed, this significant amount of savings was hugely beneficial to their practice.

 

  • Improved efficiency. CareMed quickly realized the benefits of Practice EHR’s simple workflow. With such an easy-to-use system, CareMed could easily onboard new staff members and train them on the EHR system in minutes. The simple workflow also helped CareMed save valuable time on daily tasks.

 

  • Improved operations. The Practice EHR reporting tool also became a fundamental feature, providing CareMed with a detailed view of their practice. The Practice EHR reporting tool gave CareMed essential clinical and financial insights about their practice that was instrumental in their growth and success.

 

  • Improved patient engagement. With the help of Practice EHR’s integrated patient portal, CareMed also experienced improved patient engagement. An increasing amount of patients were using the portal to make payments, schedule appointments and communicate with the practice. The patient portal became a favorite feature, resulting in benefits for both the patient and the practice.

 

 

About Practice EHR

Practice EHR is a fully-integrated, cost-effective and easy-to-use electronic health record (EHR) and practice management (PM) solution exclusively designed to support small practices and drive a healthy practice. With no startup costs and free data migration, training, and support, Practice EHR is perfect for startup practices and growing medical practices.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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The future of EHRs - and it's not even in the EHR 

The future of EHRs - and it's not even in the EHR  | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Voice recognition and natural language processing will enable doctors and nurses to interact with electronic health record platforms in more comfortable ways.

 

Along with a fistful of cutting-edge technologies, an interesting trend has begun to emerge that may help predict a direction forward for the way users interface with electronic health records.

Hint: It’s not in the EHR. Instead, emerging technologies such as ambient listening, voice assistants and natural language processing will provide a subtle buffer between EHR data and users. Clinicians will be able to access and contribute to data within electronic health records software or cloud services, in fact, without having to touch the EHR itself.

 

Let’s take a look at how this could play out.

EHRs today

As they have evolved, EHRs have also become more complicated and “busy.”  They require significant investment in training, both prior to adoption and ongoing as new features are released. 

Telling a primary care group back in 2000 that 6-8 hours of classroom training was required for every physician would have been the ultimate non-starter. Today, this is the norm and accepted as reasonable and it also holds true for the analysts who configure and support these systems of record.

 

Documentation requirements continue to increase, too. The push to document in a codified way has become more important in order to inform not only electronic decision support but also to support population health management initiatives and advanced data analytics. Plus, medical knowledge is eclipsing providers’ capabilities to internalize it and incorporate it into their practice.

So what does this point to?

Voice recognition, NLP and remote scribes

Providers have already begun to adopt technologies such as voice recognition and natural language processing that allow them to distance themselves from the complexities of the EHR.

Since a clinician is technically in the record while dictating via voice recognition, he or she is interacting with the system with a software buffer that the typist does not have.

 

A more pronounced example is the scribe. Far from a new idea, the scribe allows the provider to see the patient and remain fully focused on the task at hand while someone else does the documentation on their behalf.  While this comes with a certain level of awkwardness for the patient, it has been widely adopted in some clinical settings.

 

Natural language processing has been discussed in concept and used in pockets for many years. While loaded with potential and extremely appealing, it has yet to take off as a full-fledged documentation solution.

 

More innovative alternatives are also being explored. Remote scribes allow the transcriptionist to listen to the visit in real time and document as the provider speaks their way through the examination.  his may be implemented as an audio-only solution or with audio and video through the use of a tablet or some other video-enabled device in the exam room. Ambient devices are also being investigated as alternatives — pairing voice recognition with a mostly hands-free documentation experience minus the scribe. Google Glass is another interesting alternative. In this concept, the provider is not only dictating as they examine the patient but also visualizing elements of the record as they go without having to refer to a computer or tablet.

Tech challenges and costs

These novel technologies are not without challenges.  For the remote scribe model to be successful – especially in the case of audio-only – providers need to run through their visits in a common way for the process to be accurate and efficient. The scribe also must document the right information in the right place in the record. If they are merely typing a free text note – the value of the data is lost. Decision support is one of the most compelling reasons to use an EHR. How can the provider receive this guidance if they are not interacting directly with the system? A hybrid solution could solve for this – with the provider manually performing order entry and prescribing tasks. Alternatively, technology developers may come up with an innovative solution to address the requirement in the future.

 

Patient perception is also a concern. As with the traditional human scribe, patients may react negatively to the notion of a virtual third party participating in their visit. How can the patient be sure that only the identified third party is listening/watching? How can they be assured that the visit is not being recorded or shared? What type of consent is required and what details need to be shared with the patient in order for them to be aware of the process? What if the patient declines to participate in this type of visit?

 

Security, of course, will be paramount both for the patient and the hospital.  We all hear of major security breaches on a weekly basis. Executives and (increasingly) patients will need guarantees that these solutions are secure and insulated from the risks that come with the possibility of a data breach.

 

Traditionally the solutions that allow providers to document patient care without interacting with the record have been utilized mainly in the ambulatory, urgent care, and emergency department settings. Is there an option that would work for inpatient providers? Is there an option that would be suitable for nursing documentation? It may very well be that the answer is “no” and that these caregivers will continue to document directly in the record (either manually or with traditional voice recognition) for the foreseeable future.

Back to the future

There is, of course, a financial component to all this as well. Scribes and the more advanced technologies described are not inexpensive.  It will be up to technology developers and service providers to clearly articulate the return on investment.  It is noteworthy that some of that ROI will be difficult to quantify in terms of dollars or efficiency as it relates to provider happiness.

Even with all of these questions, it is clear that the trend of providers moving further away from direct interaction with the EHR is real and likely to continue. 

 

Ideally, EHR developers and regulatory agencies will see this as a challenge to simplify their products and documentation requirements. It’s possible that this is the push the industry needs to rethink usability and truly develop intuitive systems that are easy to learn and easy to use. This will require not only creativity and skill but also a willingness to rethink many of the constructs the industry has operated under for the last decade-plus.

 

It is more likely that the burgeoning trend will continue to progress and we will find ourselves in a “Back to Future” scenario where providers use the medical record to access information but harness various forms of new age dictation to keep it updated.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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