EHR and Health IT Consulting
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EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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Did Meaningful Use Requirements Propel Hospital EHR Adoption?

Did Meaningful Use Requirements Propel Hospital EHR Adoption? | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Ever since 2009 when the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act became law, the majority of healthcare providers began adopting EHR systems and other health IT tools in order to meet the meaningful use requirements under the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentives Programs and avoid the financial penalties set for 2015 and the following years.

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) supported EHR adoption among hospitals and physician practices through a variety of resources and advisories. Recently, ONC released a data brief that outlines the high EHR adoption rates among hospitals and other providers.


The brief outlines the trends in the adoption of EHR technology between the years 2008 to 2014. ONC also tracked the implementation of certified EHR systems that meet meaningful use requirements as well as general health IT systems.


The results show that 76 percent of hospitals have a basic EHR system. This statistic has increased tremendously over the years, rising by 27 percent from 2013. Out of these reported hospitals, 97 percent have adopted certified EHR technology that meets meaningful use requirements under the EHR Incentive Programs.


Hospital EHR adoption varies significantly across states, ranging from 50 percent to 100 percent. Delaware, South Dakota, and Virginia have the highest rates of basic EHR adoption among hospitals. Kansas, West Virginia, and Hawaii were the three states with the lowest adoption rate of basic EHR systems.

State adoption of EHR systems has also risen significantly from 2008 to 2014, the ONC data brief shows. In 2008, only Connecticut and New Mexico had adoption rates of basic EHR systems above 20 percent.


By 2011, this statistic rose and 32 states had a hospital EHR adoption rate above 20 percent while seven states had a rate above 40 percent. By 2014, hospital EHR adoption rates were above 60 percent in 48 states and above 80 percent in 17 of those states. Clearly, these trends are rising significantly to meet meaningful use requirements and prevent the financial penalties under the EHR Incentive Programs.


The use of advanced functionalities within EHR systems is also increasing. For example, many more hospitals are using EHR technology that includes clinician notes. Additionally, 34.4 percent of hospitals have implemented comprehensive EHR systems in 2014.

Essentially, the adoption of EHR systems among acute care hospitals has quickly increased once the HITECH Act was passed in 2009 and providers began pursuing meaningful use requirements. State EHR adoption rates have also steadily increased among hospitals since the legislation was passed.


“A favorite question of mine, asked during the sessions and included in the report, is the following: ‘The real question is not what data we want to collect, but what problem are we trying to solve?’ I believe the real problem we are trying to solve is how to advance the public’s health wherever people live, work, learn or play, using information and data as a tool,” National Coordinator for Health IT Karen B. DeSalvo stated on the ONC website.


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Latest MU Results Offer Something to Ponder

Latest MU Results Offer Something to Ponder | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

When is a surprise not a surprise? That might be a question to ask some of the Doubting Thomases in healthcare and healthcare IT these days. Because, honestly, when the initial meaningful use Stage 2 attestation numbers came out late last fall, the sense of “I told you so” was fairly strong among many in healthcare. As our Senior Editor, David Raths, reported in November, a number of healthcare association leaders noted that the fact that only 840 hospitals had attested to Stage 2 at that point, and many were ready to declare the entire meaningful use process a failure.

And many had very legitimate concerns, given the level of challenges providers have been facing going into and through Stage 2. But I will say that I, for one, had always trusted the industry observers who had expected most attestations to come at the very last moment. And that is exactly what’s happened.

As David Raths reported on Jan. 14, “With one month left in the 2014 reporting period, 77 percent of hospitals eligible to attest to Stage 2 of the meaningful use program have already done so, according to figures presented at the Jan. 13, 2015, HIT Policy Committee meeting.” As he further reported, “Concerns about low attestation rates earlier in 2014 may have been mitigated by two factors, explained Elisabeth Myers from the Office of E-Health Standards and Services at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid. First, most eligible hospitals tend to attest after their fiscal report year closes, and that held true this year… Second is the fact not all hospitals and providers are eligible for Stage 2 in 2014.” And as Paul Tang, M.D., the committee’s co-chair, noted, the phenomenon of hospitals waiting until the end of the fiscal year is tracking with a pattern from previous years.

So the plain fact is that more than three-quarters of the hospitals eligible to attest in 2014 have now done so. And that’s a good thing. Are they facing an uphill battle going into 2015? Absolutely. Will some fail to make it successfully to and through Stage 3? Quite possibly.

But it’s important to consider that, in the context of this arduous journey of meaningful use, this 77 percent statistic is significant, and should not be minimized.

Meanwhile, it is interesting to note that only 200 hospitals will see payment adjustments as of this moment, and the number set to get adjustments of more than $5,000 is going to be quite small.

So as challenging as everything looks right now, there is definitely reason for a very cautious flavor of optimism. While this is no time for early victory laps, perhaps things in MU Land are not as dire as some of the Debbie Downers might have led us to believe, either.

And then of course, Stage 3 is now very much on the horizon. As Jeff Smith of CHIME noted earlier this week, “Stage 3 proposed rules are currently under review at the Office of Management and Budget (OMB)—the last step before being released for public comment.” And, Smith noted, “The Stage 3 Notice for Proposed Rulemaking (PRM) process is the most likely vehicle CMS and the Office of the national Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) could use to make changes that CHIME and other stakeholders have been advocating. This is the best chance,” he added, “to make substantive changes to meaningful use and revive an ailing program.”

So we’ll see what happens. Doubtless, the next several months will be pivotal for the meaningful use program going forward. So stay tuned. And keep your powder dry.


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