EHR and Health IT Consulting
46.0K views | +5 today
Follow
EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scoop.it!

Reduce the Pain of Switching EHR Software with These Four Steps

Reduce the Pain of Switching EHR Software with These Four Steps | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

There are days when you have to face that monster behind the screen. EHR replacement can be a significant challenge for any healthcare executive or IT administrator. The reasons vary—from performance issues to software being discontinued by the vendor.

 

Seeking the right EMR software solution to overcome these problems is becoming more difficult as companies innovate and evolve to meet the demands of an increasingly complex healthcare environment. The whirlwind of options can be confusing as you seek the best EHR software to improve physician productivity, financial outcomes, and patient satisfaction.The following tips will help you find the solution you need to achieve your organization’s goals.

Start your search for a new EHR vendor with these steps

Here are the top recommendations for choosing an EHR vendor to make this change something you only have to do once.

Step 1: Develop a Request for Proposal (RFP)

An RFP allows you to compare potential partners. It provides a framework for providing detailed information about your practice and listing specific requirements. It’s well worth the effort in making sure prospective vendors have guidelines to prepare a proposal that clearly addresses your needs.

Step 2: Give them a wish list

A wish list of key features, functions, and reporting needs gives prospective vendors a full picture of what you expect from a partner. When they respond, you’ll have a better understanding of how their services will fulfill your goals.

Step 3: Research, research, and more research

Go online to read blogs, customer comments, and third-party review sites. Talk with your clinicians and staff to get more details about what works and doesn’t work with the current EHR system. Reach out to peers in professional organizations to learn more from their experiences.

Step 4: Go beyond the sales pitch and get to know the vendor

An EHR solution goes beyond the software. EHR replacement involves the personalities that you’ll be working with on a regular basis. You need to take time to get to know the vendors and make sure they’ll be a good fit for your practice.

Have questions ready

Similar to how a business develops interview questions for to ask a candidate for an important position, your practice needs to prepare a list of specific questions for your potential EHR partner. Here are a few questions to consider:

  • Does the EHR provide robust, specialty content out of the box?
  • Will the partner be able to meet the demands as my practice grows?
  • Does the EHR vendor offer the full end-to-end solution from when the patient arrives to when the payment is collected?
  • Does the EHR vendor ensure a true continuum of care?

A partnership built on trust every step of the way

Switching to the right EHR software to yield better results requires a partner you can trust. Managing the complexity and difficulty in keeping up with workflow demand is possible with a partner who will be there every step of the way. It’s essential that they share the same amount of passion and commitment you have in serving your clinicians, staff, and patients.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Why Are Some EHR Systems Confusing and Inefficient?

Why Are Some EHR Systems Confusing and Inefficient? | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

In theory, EHR systems can alleviate informational errors, increase efficiency and allow doctors to spend more time with patients. The reality, however, is that many EHR solutions can talk the talk, but they can hardly walk the walk.

 

Why is this?

Some EHR companies in the marketplace have produced software without doing their due diligence to completely understand what a doctor’s real day looks and feels like -- they’ve produced generic platforms that don’t address doctors’ real concerns.


Any EHR System Must:

  • Be Scalable
  • Integrate Seamlessly with Other Software
  • Have a Simple User Experience
  • Priced Fairly for the Practice

The third bullet, ‘Have a Simple User Experience,’ is the benefit we’re going to be discussing today because it’s often taken for granted. 

A Simple User Experience

Inputting data into a computer is easy, but the problem arises when EHR solutions can’t correctly identify a doctor’s workflow. Doctors have hundreds of patients, and since no two are alike, thousands of records of unique data are created. This data demands distinct form fields to capture a patient’s specific information. EHR systems must be prepared to capture, organize and file this data away so that a doctor can easily recall it when needed. And when it is recalled, this information must be easily understood by the doctor who may have forgotten exactly how he inputted it.

The solution is intuitive form fields and workflows.

EHR systems should allow for any doctor or office manager to easily understand where to input the right data into the right field. This may sound simple, but most EHR systems just do not comprehend the gravity of proper user experience.

When form fields are misunderstood and unobvious, data finds itself into the wrong reports. In the healthcare industry, this is alarming. Not only does this open up practices and doctors to lawsuits, but before you know it, the EHR system that was supposed to save your practice time and money is now doing the exact opposite.

The Power of Practice EHR
Next-generation, cloud-based software can and will improve a doctor’s day, but not every EHR system is created equal. The Practice EHR team was frustrated by the poor quality of the very EHR systems that were supposed to be improving doctors’ day-to-day lives. So we went and built a better one.

Practice EHR is a solution built by doctors for doctors. It’s specialty-specific, meaning it comes out of the box purpose-built for your specialty practice. It’s also the perfect system for smaller practices of about 1-3 doctors and it was made to alleviate time and hassle in doctors’ busy schedules.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
Scoop.it!

EHR Features for the Modern Medical Practice

EHR Features for the Modern Medical Practice | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Keeping up with the changing healthcare landscape can be a challenge for many healthcare providers. There’s been a lot to tackle in 2017, from regulatory changes to new physician reimbursement systems, and changes like these can make it difficult for independent medical practices to stay afloat. Aside from MACRA, one of the biggest challenges we hear from our customers is the increasingly competitive nature of healthcare.

 

With increasing patient expectations and demands causing a consumer-driven healthcare environment, it’s time for medical practices to start considering how they can adapt to stay competitive. Our tip: strive to be the modern medical practice— one you and your patients will love. And leverage your EHR to help in this transition. A good EHR should provide great features to help medical practices stay ahead of the curve and be more successful.

 

What functionality and features should forward-thinking medical practices look for in an EHR? We’ve narrowed it down to three simple categories:

 

  • Features that support patient interactions and engagement. 

Does the EHR have a patient kiosk that will create a more enjoyable check-in experience? Is there a patient portal that allows patients to conveniently schedule appointments, make payments, access their records, download educational resources and securely message the physician? Features similar to those that improve the overall patient experience are necessary in today’s world. They not only help a practice stand out from the competition but also add conveniences for the patient and the entire care team.

 

  • Features that help keep you mobile. 

Medical practices who want greater flexibility should consider a cloud-based EHR. With modern features, like cloud accessibility and applications, physicians can securely access their EHR whenever and from wherever they want, using the device they are most comfortable with (i.e. desktop or iPad). Imagine conducting a patient visit virtually, or getting to choose between documenting using free text and clicks or a voice recognition program. Features like Televisit and voice recognition make these convenient scenarios possible.

 

  • Features that improve practice productivity and efficiency. 

Healthcare is an ever-changing environment and with so much to manage there’s even more reason for medical practices to make sure they run optimally. Your EHR should support that goal. A modern dashboard and a good document management setup that is easy to navigate, allows physicians to find what they need, when they need it, and also improves the amount of time it takes to facilitate care. In addition, medical practices can highly benefit from integrated features like e-prescribing, billing, and reporting. These features support better practice operations all around, such as more timely and accurate reimbursements, improved efficiency, staff communication, and patient experiences.

 

But Not All EHR Systems Are Created Equal

Some EHR solutions don’t offer these modern features and benefits. Practice EHR comes standard with these features.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

VA's EHR project is 'yellow trending towards red,' says report obtained by ProPublica

VA's EHR project is 'yellow trending towards red,' says report obtained by ProPublica | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

The Department of Veterans Affairs' EHR contract with Cerner has been plagued by multiple roadblocks during the past year, including personnel issues and changing expectations, according to a ProPublica investigation.

 

Former VA Secretary David Shulkin, MD, released the agency's plan to scrap its homegrown EHR VistA for a Cerner system during a news briefing in June 2017. Almost one year later, the VA finalized a $10 billion no-bid contract with Cerner to implement its EHR systemwide over a 10-year period, beginning with a set of test sites in March 2020.

 

However, a recent progress report by Cerner rated its EHR project with the VA at alert level "yellow trending towards red," according to ProPublica. To investigate the underlying factors that have contributed to the EHR project's problems, the publication reviewed internal documents and conducted interviews with current and former VA officials, congressional staff and outside experts.

 

Here are five details from ProPublica's investigation:

1. When Dr. Shulkin initially announced his plan to implement Cerner at the VA, he emphasized the EHR would provide "seamless care" to veterans, since the Department of Defense had also recently signed a contract with Cerner. However, in September 2017, the VA convened a panel of industry experts who objected to this claim, noting two health systems using Cerner doesn't mean they will be able to share all data with one another.

 

2. At another meeting, Cerner representatives gave a presentation on how their software would be able to share data with private providers, three people present told ProPublica. However, Dr. Shulkin noticed the representatives were only talking about prescription data, rather than the full record of health data, lab reports and medical images that the VA would need. Dr. Shulkin reportedly cut the meeting short and told Cerner to come back with a better solution.

 

3. Cerner's off-the-shelf product didn't match the VA's EHR needs, according to ProPublica. While Cerner's software successfully helps private hospitals bill insurers, the VA doesn't need these same functionalities, since the agency serves as the sole payer for its patient population. Cerner's product also didn't have features for some of the VA's core specialties, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, since these conditions aren't as common in the general population.

 

4. Dr. Shulkin, who left the VA in March, reportedly wanted to find a CIO with a background in healthcare and experience leading major software transitions to helm the EHR project. The VA enlisted two search firms, which identified several qualified candidates, according to sources who spoke with ProPublica. However, the Presidential Personnel Office rejected them, and the White House instead proposed candidates who had worked on the Trump campaign but didn't have a background in health IT.

 

5. At a recent subcommittee hearing, some lawmakers questioned the VA's work on the Cerner project and asked whether the DOD should head up its implementation. Instead, the VA and DOD secretaries opted to sign a joint statement Sept. 26 pledging to align their EHR strategies. However, industry experts warned ProPublica that the agencies have different medical priorities, as the DOD treats young people with acute injuries while the VA provides long-term care to those with complex illnesses.

 

VA spokesman Curt Cashour declined to answer specific questions from ProPublica, saying that "efforts thus far have been successful and we are confident they will continue to be successful." The White House didn't provide answers to a list of questions ProPublica sent, and Cerner also declined to comment.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

3 Key Areas to Address During EHR Optimization

3 Key Areas to Address During EHR Optimization | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

If you have ever purchased a new home, you are rarely 100% satisfied when you move in. You may want to add some new furniture, paint a few walls, update the flooring or even do a complete remodel. When implementing a new Electronic Health Record (EHR), many times the need to “get the system live” as soon as possible, results in a rushed implementation of basic functionality and “out of the box” workflows.

 

There is not always time to look at current issues and identify ways to improve processes. Many times the current problems are merely transferred into the new system. Even if you love everything about your new EHR, Optimization of the system will always be necessary due to factors such as advances in medical treatment, compliance & regulatory changes, adding of new specialties and more.

 

Whether it is your existing EHR or a new system, for optimization to be effective, experts with clinical, operational and technical experience will need to look at how the system is working. You may have such experts employed, or you may need to bring in consultants. Either way, these experts will assess how users are interacting with the EHR and if they are having functionality and/or workflow issues. Sometimes, problems can be addressed by merely providing additional training, especially if new features and functionality have been deployed.

 

By taking a thorough look at the system and its users, experts can determine what improvements need to be made.

Below are three areas to take into consideration: 

  1. Governance: A strong governance structure is critical to having a successful optimization plan. Requests for changes to the EHR must be prioritized and evaluated.  An agile governance group made up of the right members, should meet monthly to review all requests and prioritize according to the overall needs of the organization.
  2. Training:  A comprehensive training program is a critical factor that impacts the usability of the EHR. Many times organizations provide new employee training but do not offer any “ongoing” or “refresher” training. Supplemental training can increase basic and advanced knowledge of the system and improve efficiency. As system upgrades and new functionality are implemented, users should have an option to attend classroom training. eLearning can be helpful, but there is no substitute for hands-on classroom training where the user can ask questions and get answers.
  3. Communication: Organizations should have effective and comprehensive communications regarding training, new functionality, and any other changes to the EHR. The creation of a formal enterprise-wide communication plan using a variety of forums and a broad spectrum of communications resources is essential. Being proactive versus reactive such as having the EHR topic as a standing agenda item at a section and other scheduled MD meetings can be very useful.
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

20 Questions to Ask an EHR Vendor Before Making the Switch

20 Questions to Ask an EHR Vendor Before Making the Switch | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Choosing the right electronic health record (EHR) for your medical practice is a big decision. There are so many software's on the market today and it can be difficult for medical practices to find one that’s the best fit for their practice.

 

In order to make the best decision, it’s important to ask the right questions and have an honest conversation with the vendor about their software. Where do you start? The following is a list of 20 questions medical practices should ask before making the switch. This list is a compilation of the most commonly asked questions we hear from our prospective customers.

 

Ask the following questions and add a few of your own based on the needs of your practice. Asking the right questions and digging deep will help you find not only an EHR vendor but a partner who’s also committed to helping your practice be successful.

Learn about the company.

1. How many other practices use your software that our similar to my practice size and specialty?

2. Aside from EHR/PM, what other products and services can you offer my practice?

3. How do you keep my data secure?

4. Who owns the data in the system?

5. What sets you apart from other vendors?

 

Get to know the software.

6. Do you have an integrated practice management system? 

7. What clearinghouse do you use?

8. What types of devices can I use with your software?

9. Is your software cloud-based?

10. Is your system easy to use?

11. Is your software ONC 2015 Edition certified?

12. What reports are available in your EHR?

13. How will this software help improve patient flow and operations in my practice?

14. Are there any extra costs related to the software?

 

Ask questions about training, implementation, and support.

15. How long is the implementation process?

16. How is my data migrated into the EHR?

17. How does training work?

18. How responsive are your product development team and customer support team?

19. What are your support hours?

20. Are there costs related to set up, training, implementation or support?

more...
Scoop.it!

Which Multiregional EHR Vendors Fared Well Globally in 2018?

Which Multiregional EHR Vendors Fared Well Globally in 2018? | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Among multiregional electronic health record (EHR) vendors, Epic and Cerner contracts accounted for the most new hospital beds in 2018, according to a new report from KLAS Research.

 

Last year, more than 180 healthcare organizations outside the U.S. made EHR purchase decisions—impacting 377 hospitals, according to the Utah-based KLAS, which released the report on May 9, a week after it released it’s U.S. hospital EHR market share report. Last week’s U.S.-based findings revealed that for the second year in a row, Cerner signed the highest number of new hospitals, but large private sector hospitals are almost exclusively choosing Epic technology.

 

The global EHR market share report for 2019 similarly discloses that Epic and Cerner are leading the way in terms of volume of beds contracted in 2018. Epic’s 2018 contracts were some of the largest in scope, accounting for more new beds than any other vendor. The majority of these beds came from a regional decision in Singapore in which Epic was chosen as the go-forward vendor in two of the country’s three integrated healthcare clusters, KLAS reported. In total, Epic signed four new contracts (across three regions), which was one of their lowest totals in recent years.

 

Cerner, meanwhile, was selected as the go-forward EHR platform by two counties in Sweden that will be migrating to Millennium from a legacy Siemens solution. These decisions represent two of the largest contracts signed in 2018, both in size and technology scope (they include population health management) and are Cerner’s first Millennium deployments in the Nordics. The Millennium platform was not purchased outside of Europe in 2018.

 

Other multiregional vendors such as Agfa HealthCare, Dedalus, and InterSystems were each selected in eight or more decisions, according to the KLAS findings.

 

Agfa HealthCare was selected in 10 separate decisions (more than any other multiregional vendor). The “wins” occurred in two regions and include a number of net new large multihospital decisions. Dedalus had the most hospital wins of any multiregional vendor; these wins came mostly through GHTs (territorial hospital groups) in France; additional wins came from other decisions in France, Italy, and Kuwait. InterSystems was third in terms of new contracts, with eight, and saw the most geographic diversity, signing contracts in Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and Oceania

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
No comment yet.