EHR and Health IT Consulting
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EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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Become an EHR Super User

Become an EHR Super User | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

When I visit clinics to help them optimize EHR use, there is a clear difference between the super users and other users. While the super users may still have complaints about the system, they are nowhere near as frustrated as the other users. This is because they have invested the time in understanding how to leverage the EHR to significantly speed up their everyday workflow.

 

Most EHRs have built-in "accelerators," tools and shortcuts similar to what you find in Microsoft Word or Excel, for greater efficiency. The problem is most physicians don't bother to learn them because they've either exhausted many systems in their career or there is not ample time in the day to do anything other than "survive" in the clinic. But taking the time to learn to use something you use for hours a day every day pays off, and investing as little as an hour each week learning to better use your EHR has been shown to increase physician satisfaction.

 

Three tips to get you started


1. Make sure you understand and spend some time loading your system's "macros." You want to make checking off boxes or typing a rare, unique action, not a routine one. One rule of thinking is that if you are doing the same thing the third time, you should spend a moment to save it, memorize it, macro it or whatever your system calls it.

 

2. Get a good tool for finding diagnosis codes. I recommend Problem IT Plus. Try it and you'll thank me if you are doing this now without it.


3. Make sure you understand how your system enables team-based care. Allowing everyone to practice at the top of their license and contribute to the delivery of care is crucial. Empower the care team to create notes and use automated tasking and messaging within the EHR whenever possible.


It is an exciting time for healthcare IT: leverage tools such as the EHR and allows them to help you refocus on the business of medicine instead of the business of administration. It takes an extra hour or so a month, but allows you to focus on the three things that matter most: your patients, your practice, and yourself.

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Are Medical Practices Taking Advantage of Cloud-Based EHR?  

Are Medical Practices Taking Advantage of Cloud-Based EHR?   | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

In today’s medical field, technology is a big player. With regulations dictating that even independent practices attempt to make the jump to a dedicated EMR/EHR. An EMR/EHR, or electronic medical record/electronic health record interface, provides physicians and patients a way to connect to promote efficient healthcare delivery and organizational profitability. Today, we will look at how smaller healthcare providers are utilizing EMR/EHR solutions that are hosted in the cloud, bucking the trend of hosting their patient information locally.

 

EMR/EHR


For the modern healthcare provider, the EMR/EHR is a major piece of software. The EMR/EHR is an interface that physicians, healthcare providers, and insurers use to update the information on each patient. As the patient has access to their own EMR/EHR file as well, it makes it a very useful guide for all parties involved to manage an individual patient’s care.

 

Major Considerations
With the massive cost of health care, it isn’t much of a stretch to say that there are some very serious considerations that have to be made to the way that doctors and health organizations utilize cloud-hosted technologies. Many providers, however, are reluctant to do just that as there are serious questions about the viability of cloud computing for regulation-covered information such as electronic protected health information (ePHI). One such consideration is the massive incentives offered to organizations who implement “meaningful use” EMR/EHR technology. In order to meet the “meaningful use” criteria, however, many separate variables have to be met, including:

  • Engaging patients in their own care
  • Improving quality, efficiency, safety, and reducing health disparities
  • Improving care coordination
  • Improving public health and health education
  • Meet HIPAA regulations for the privacy of health records

 

So while many of these variables seem to be common sense, there are additional costs that go along with this kind of comprehensive use of EMR/EHR functionality, which, for smaller medical practices, can be enough of an impetus to not meet those qualifications. Cost usually supersedes most other qualifications, even in a high-stakes, results-based business model like healthcare. That means that even though utilizing cloud technology will cut costs, there is no guarantee that a practice will meet the necessary criteria for “meaningful use”.

 

That said, cloud computing has more resources available to maintain data security than ever before, and organizations can still move to an EMR/EHR solution that will benefit their users, and their staff. If you are looking for a solution to help your medical practice cut costs, get dynamic web-based functionality, or get your technology in a position to meet industry regulations, contact the experts

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When Doctors Choose a Job Based on the EHR

When Doctors Choose a Job Based on the EHR | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

I recently had lunch with a young doctor new to our community. The conversation wandered on to how she settled on her new position and the EHR was identified as one of her key selection criteria. She heavily favored positions with institutions running EPIC.

 

Interesting, I thought. Because when I took my first job, the brand of manilla folder used in the patient chart played no role in my decision. Clearly, times have changed. And so have the doctors.

What does this tell us about doctors and technology?

 

Not everybody hates electronic health records. The generation that never felt paper has officially entered the clinical workforce. And despite the popular press and their drive to perpetuate anti-EHR sentiment, not everyone hates EHRs.

 

Our experiences are increasingly defined by our tools. The clinical tools that surround us go a long way in determining our quality of life. So the EHR is likely to shape how we view a position. I’m working on my second EHR system in a decade and my day-to-day life is very different.

 

Technology can draw or repel talent. The technology we use and the systems we choose are likely to impact the docs we recruit and the talent we retain. Hospital systems that use dated and/or dysfunctional EHR systems are likely to feel the impact at some point.

 

An isolated case you might think. But the truth is that millennial physicians see the world and the workplace through a very different lens.

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The Changing Healthcare IT Consulting Landscape

The Changing Healthcare IT Consulting Landscape | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

The last several years of healthcare IT consulting, specifically around EHR implementations, has been busy and fruitful. For a period of time there, it seemed that anyone who could both breathe and type would be hired on, trained, and thrown into the fire, working at a feverous pace to digitize our Nation’s medical records. Largely, this onslaught was driven by the financial incentives of Meaningful Use – get up on an approved medical record system, hit specific targets, by specific dates, and reap large financial rewards. The incentives were highly effective and as a result the vast majority of US hospitals are now utilizing some form of electronic health record solution. But there is a murmur out there: “what’s next?”

To begin, two significant dates come to mind. The first date was May 25, 1961, when President Kennedy committed to having a man on the moon by end of the decade. To many it was an impossible goal. Something that seemed so absurd considering we had only just witnessed the first American to orbit the Earth some 20 days prior. The next 8 years were filled with collaboration, heavy investments, long hours, and much ingenuity, which all culminated to the first human to walk on the moon on July 20, 1969.

 

The second date was January 20, 2004, when President Bush, during his State of the Union address, announced his vision for the majority of American enjoying the benefits of computerized medical records within 10 years. Here we are, 10 years later, and the majority of Americans are provided care at a facility that utilizes an Electronic Health Record. The parallels between the two announcements and efforts are apparent – unbelievable amounts of money were invested and an innumerable number of people were involved in realizing the vision, similar amounts of time were allotted, and both meant accomplishing something that seemed impossible. In both cases we were successful. We successfully landed on the moon by the end of the 60’s and today the majority of Americans are provided care at a facility that utilizes an EHR.

 

We’ve accomplished what we’ve set out to do. Sure, not all facilities are utilizing an EHR yet, and not all that are using an EHR are yet meeting “meaningful use guidelines”, but for the most part, the big push is complete. The big question that looms is: what’s next? And this question is one that riles many who were involved in this great undertaking. It’s alarming and concerning to know that what you’ve become accustomed to will be changing – demands of great effort and great ingenuity working tirelessly to discuss, plan, build, configure, test, train, implement, and support, and then repeat and repeat again – this will be changing. But this is the nature of IT. Without successfully completing our mission, would be akin to Neil Armstrong not taking the first step onto the Moon. But as with NASA, that first step wasn’t the last one either, but the beginning of what would become its greatest era with the likes of the Hubble Space Telescope, Space Shuttle, and Rover programs.

 

I believe that this is just the beginning of a more exciting time for healthcare IT. That the real bread and butter, the real pleasure from the work we do, and the real benefit to patients is just beginning. Now that the majority are utilizing an EHR, we can now leverage the efforts and investments through optimization, integration, and interoperability. Through optimization, we can make the experience more effective for both the clinician and the patient. Through integration with other health software, we can extend the capabilities of the EHR further using the EHR as the jumping off point. And through interoperability it’s easier to share patient information when it’s needed the most; no more burning CDs with images or faxing results.

 

About the only tangible benefit of utilizing an EHR over a paper based documentation system is legibility; it’s not having an EHR that matters, rather it’s how the digital bits of information are used and leveraged that makes the difference. Walking on the moon did very little for us, it’s what it took to get there, what it represented, and its ability to make us realize our potential that mattered most.

It’s important that we never stop progressing, that we never settle down and accept status quo. We must continue to innovate.

 

Moving to an EHR from a paper based documentation system should never be the end goal but rather the means to getting there. As a healthcare IT professional, your continued success will be in driving this progress forward. Continuing to look for opportunities – by recognizing issues when they present themselves and developing solutions, continuing to develop yourself through continuing education and certifications, and networking with other professionals. The possibilities are endless really, and now is the time when we get to see the real benefit of this investment. Now is the time for leverage.

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Smaller Practices are Choosing Cloud-Based EHR 

Smaller Practices are Choosing Cloud-Based EHR  | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

The medical field has spawned all kinds of new technology that takes patient care to the next level. Regulations demand that even smaller practices need to make the jump to electronic medical record systems (also known as electronic health records). These EMR/EHR solutions provide an interface that gives providers and patients a way to keep themselves connected to each other--a tool to promote a more efficient delivery method for these services. We’ll take a look at these EMR and EHR solutions that are hosted in the cloud, giving your organization more information to make an educated choice on implementing this software.

 

EMR/EHR


EMR/EHR is a critical piece of software for any modern healthcare provider. EMR/EHR is an interface that gives physicians, healthcare providers, and insurers access to updated information about their patients, all at a glance. Since the patient has access to their own file, it can help to promote transparency and collaboration between healthcare providers and patients to improve the quality of their care.

 

Major Considerations


Healthcare is expensive for both patients and providers, which should prompt them to consider a cloud-hosted solution as a viable strategy to minimize costs associated with this industry. Unfortunately, many providers are somewhat reluctant to implement cloud-hosted solutions, even in the face of regulatory compliance laws. There are many serious questions that need to be considered by any organization hoping to take advantage of electronic records--particularly those who store electronic protected health information (ePHI). One of the many considerations any practice needs to consider is the incredible incentive offered to businesses that implement “meaningful use” EMR/EHR technology. To qualify as “meaningful use,” the following variables need to be met:

 

  • Engaging patients in their own care
  • Improving quality, efficiency, safety, and reducing health disparities
  • Improving care coordination
  • Improving public health and health education
  • Meet HIPAA regulations for the privacy of health records


Some of these might seem like common sense, but the costs associated with meeting all of these requirements might be used as an excuse to not invest in these qualifications. Cost is one of the most important factors to consider, and in a high-risk market like healthcare, industry providers generally don’t want to spend more than they have to. The end result is that an organization might utilize cloud-based technology to cut their costs, but there is no guarantee that they will be able to sustain “meaningful use” as it’s defined above.

 

With that said, cloud computing has really come into its own over the past few years, providing even more great services (including security) than ever before--services that EMR/EHR can really benefit from. If you want to implement a solution that can help your medical practice reduce costs and improve functionality, or if you just want to meet the changes in industry regulations, look no further. SouthBridge Consulting can help your business implement high-quality technology solutions designed to increase profits and efficiency. To learn more, reach out to us at (281) 816-6430.

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The EHR and Rage Against the Machine

The EHR and Rage Against the Machine | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

The EHR is the latest focus of our rage against the machine. Case in point: Chrissy Farr’s poke at the EHR in today’s Fast Company. Red meat for angry old doctors.

 

What might be interesting is to take a bunch of millennial doctors and make them work for a month with clipboards, fax machines, mailed letters and emulsion films on view boxes? Then we could write a story about the joy and efficiency of manilla folder medicine.

 

I suspect it would put things in perspective.

We fancy ourselves as victims of our technology. But while EHRs have a long way to go, it’s a long way back to paper.

 

I was in an elevator at Texas Children’s Hospital this weekend where there were a number of people looking at their smartphones.  An older gentleman in the elevator remarked shaking his head, “I remember a time when people used to talk.”

 

Actually, no one talked in elevators.  We’ve always stood the same direction and stared at the numbers at the top of the door.

 

It’s easy to blame technology on our human shortcomings.  It’s been suggested that the adoption of EHR has us ignoring patients.  But in the old days, we scribbled on paper.  Irresponsible resident and medical student conduct with social media are blamed on the platform.  But trainees have always done and said stupid things.

Blame it our chauvinistic human bias:  “It’s not me, it’s the machine.”

 

While there are those of us who share a perverse relationship with our tools, it’s important to remember that the world wasn’t necessarily rainbows and unicorns before [insert technology of choice] appeared.

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Are Providers Satisfied With Their EHR?

Are Providers Satisfied With Their EHR? | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Physicians are expected to document encounters with patients. This ensures there is a record of crucial information for decision-making and dispute. A decade ago, around 90% of physicians updated their patient records by hand. By the end of 2014, 83% of physicians had adopted EHR systems. The combination of government incentives, advances in technology, and improved outcomes and operations fueled this growth.

When healthcare providers have access to complete and accurate information, patients receive better care and have better outcomes. Electronic Health Records (EHRs) improve providers’ ability to diagnose disease and reduce medical errors. EHRs further help providers meet patient demands, provide decision support, improve communication, and aid in regulatory reporting.

A national survey of providers highlights their perspective on the benefits of having EHR in their practice:

  • 94% of providers report that their EHR makes records readily available at point of care.
  • 88% of providers report that their EHR produces clinical benefits for the practice.
  • 75% of providers report that their EHR allows them to deliver better patient care.

As the adoption of EHR grew over the last 10 years, so too did the need to change EHR systems within health systems, hospitals, and private medical practices. Growth in M&A activity fueled many healthcare organizations to combine data through EHR data conversion. Provider dissatisfaction has played a key role in encouraging change in EHR systems, also increasing EHR data conversion activity.

A study completed by Health Affairs showed, by and large, providers recognize the important advances that EHRs enable. Fewer than 20% of all providers said they would return to paper records. That being said, providers also noted negative effects of current EHRs on their professional lives and on patient care.  While excited about the possibilities provided by EHRs, providers have ultimately found poor usability that does not match clinical workflows, time-consuming data entry, interference with patient interaction, and too many electronic messages and alerts.

According to a 2014 survey of physicians conducted by AmericanEHR Partners:

  • 54% indicated their EHR system increased their total operating costs.
  • 55% said is was difficult or very difficult to use their EHR to improve efficiency.
  • 72% said it was difficult or very difficult to use their EHR to decrease workload.
  • 43% said they had not yet overcome productivity challenges associated with their EHR implementation.

These concerns about EHR usability are in alignment with others, including the American Medical Informatics Association, researchers, and practicing physicians. Given the rate at which many healthcare organizations have adopted EHRs, these organizations find themselves unable to wait for the long-run fixes. Healthcare organizations are now looking to change EHR providers in order to fix many of the providers’ concerns.

As healthcare organizations begin the process of changing EHR providers, there is an increased need for solutions to provide access to and maintain the integrity of data stored in the legacy systems. When this need arises, healthcare organizations have the choice to archive the legacy data, run multiple systems simultaneously, or complete an EHR data conversion.

Given the complexity of the data and variety of potential solutions, one might suppose that handling legacy data would be a complex affair. In many ways, that is true. However, it doesn’t have to be. To learn more about the state of EHRs and potential solutions for maintaining access and integrity of legacy data.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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