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Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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drchrono preps EHR, PHR for Apple Watch

drchrono preps EHR, PHR for Apple Watch | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

The first developer to make an EHR exclusively for the iPad is now aiming to be the first choice for physicians and patients looking to make the most of their new Apple Watches.


When the Apple Watch first becomes available from select retailers April 24,  Mountain View, Calif.-based ambulatory EHR developer drchrono will be ready – just as is it was five years ago, when a newfangled contraption called the iPad first hit stores.


At HIMSS15 in Chicago this past week, Daniel Kivatinos, drchrono's co-founder and chief operating officer, demonstrated new software for the Apple Watch that had been in the works for months – since Apple first put out the software development kit for the device.


"The moment they release the SDK, we can build a simulator app, even though we don't actually have the physical hardware," said Kivatinos. "We did the same thing with the iPad: When we heard about the iPad in 2010, we downloaded the SDK prior to the actual hardware being released.


"The moment the physical hardware came out for the iPad, we released the app in the app store," he added. "Same situation here: The moment the physical hardware comes out, our app will be available."

Kivatinos says drchono plans to be among the first to offer an integrated EHR as soon as Apple Watch becomes available. He's excited about the device's potential to transform the office experience for doc early adopters, offering a new twist on real-time communication between physicians and their patients.


"We've thought about this a lot: What is our company, what do we do?" said Kivatinos. "Over the past several years we've realized we're creating wearable health records for doctors and patients."

With close to 70,000 physicians and more than 4 million patients registered on the drchrono platform, he said, both groups are poised to enjoy the benefits of this unique way of interaction.


"This is a completely new experience," he said. "For the first time, doctors are going to have information given to them with their hands free: A doctor could be administering a shot, picking up a child, moving an elderly person – looking at the information while doing whatever it is they need to do."


Likewise, said Kivatinos, patients should be drawn to experiencing their personal health records through a device on their wrists, using drchrono's app to schedule appointments, get medication reminders and manage their chronic diseases: "Apple creates a very nice experience for patients. It's not just about usability, it's about enjoyment."


The app will enable docs to view a patient information at a glance, respond to messages via quick text and see eRx refill requests – offering a wearable extension of the drchrono iPhone and iPad apps, according to drchrono.


"Doctors are incredibly busy; drchrono on Apple Watch gives them insights about their practice and patients just by checking their wrist," said CEO Michael Nusimow in a press statement. "Its simply amazing to have a hands-free way to gather quick insights about a patient."

Plenty of other vendors have already readied software for the Apple Watch's release, of course, and many of them were showcasing it at HIMSS15. Epic, Cerner, athenahealth, Vocera, Mayo Clinic and more all announced apps – or plans for apps – at the show.


Kivatinos said he's confident drchrono's early leadership among curious early adopters of Apple technology will keep them well-positioned among physician practices.


"If you look at the early days in 2010, we put our (iPad) app out the first week and had thousands and thousands of docs download it," he said. "It took some of our competitors years to get to that point."


Physicians "want innovation, but they want it to work," said Kivatinos. "We had one doctor who bought a $100,000 EHR, and came to us a week later and said, 'This doesn't work. What do you guys have?' He literally just junked it. If it doesn't work, they're just going to walk away."

The critical questions? "Is it usable, is it designed well, can I just put information into it and walk away quickly? Can I just do my rounds? I don't want this thing in my way."


The company touts different "modes" for the Apple Watch app, depending who's using it and how. "Glance" offers a quick view, giving docs a snapshot of their patient schedule for the day. "Short Look Notifications" can display brief messages generated from the EHR app. "Long Look Notifications" offer a doctor a view of the app itself.


Kivatinos says he's "100 percent" certain the Apple Watch is going to catch on in a big way among consumers – and his customers.

I wonder aloud whether the embrace might be more tepid – something akin to a new form factor such as Google Glass, which found limited acceptance among the general public, but is still enjoying innovative clinical use cases.


Kivatinos says he's convinced it's an Apple to oranges comparison. Glass, with its temple tapping and head nodding, necessitated a new and sometimes questionable type of social etiquette, he said. The "experience was a little different: harder to set things up and install," he said – to say nothing of the cost.


"I bought a Google Glass. It cost $2,000 with prescription lenses," he said. "$2,000 and $350 is a drastic difference. Price point is so critical."

Whether it's docs looking for easy access to vital signs, staff messaging, e-prescriptions and labs; or patients looking for an attractive and convenient interaction to manage their meds or schedule appointments, he's convinced the Apple Watch will find favor among folks and physicians alike.



"The interest is amazingly high," he said.


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Can Apple, Others Bring PGHD to the EMR?

Can Apple, Others Bring PGHD to the EMR? | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Not settled with simply being the dominant device on which clinical data applications are hosted, Apple made another step towards becoming an even more ubiquitous presence at healthcare organizations last week when it launched ResearchKit.


ResearchKit is a platform that allows healthcare organizations to host apps that will get people to participate in clinical trials. During an event for the press, the company announced a few initial partnerships with major healthcare provider organizations to use ResearchKit, including Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Penn Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital, Stanford Hospital, and more.


ResearchKit builds off HealthKit, which was a health platform Apple launched last year that aimed to connect personally-generated health data and clinical data. Since HealthKit’s launch, many notable healthcare organizations, including Stanford Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, and EHR vendors like Epic, have all partnered with Apple to work in their own patient-generated data applications.


The Cupertino, Calif.-based company is part of a wider movement in the industry to bring patient-generated health data (PGHD), from various portals and monitoring devices, into clinical data applications like the electronic medical record (EMR). The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC), in its proposed rule for Stage 3 of meaningful use, made integrating PGHD into the EHR a requirement for eligible hospitals and providers.


Of course, this integration is easier said than done. Healthcare Informatics Senior Editor Gabriel Perna spoke with Rob Faix, principal advisor at the Naperville, Ill.-based consulting firm, Impact Advisors on the most recent edition of the Healthcare Informatics podcast. Faix discusses the challenges of bringing together patient and clinical data; why Apple has taken the lead in this category with many prominent healthcare organizations; and how ResearchKit can be a game changer.


“Integrating this data will be a significant challenge but I think it’s one that hardware device vendors, software developers, and EMR vendors are up for…it’s the next big opportunity,” Faix says. “


Faix talks about how this integration may happen. He predicts there will be a staging process, where PGHD is graded and reviewed. “Context will be important. The software and EMR vendors and the clinical community are really going have to think about that as we integrate PGHD into the EMR,” he says.


Sifting through a potential avalanche of data will present itself as a challenge, as will having to deal with potential issues of liability. “I have information in front of me that I chose to accept or discard, and therefore, it could be tied back to an adverse event,” Faix says.


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Free iOS App from ADP AdvancedMD Allows Any Physician Practice to Assess ICD-10 Preparedness

Free iOS App from ADP AdvancedMD Allows Any Physician Practice to Assess ICD-10 Preparedness | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

South Jordan, Utah – February 24, 2015– ADP® AdvancedMD, a leader in all-in-one, cloud electronic health record (EHR), practice management, medical scheduling, medical billing services as well as a pioneer of big data reporting and business intelligence for smaller medical practices, today announced the release and availability of AdvancedMD ICD-10 Toolkit, a free app that gives private practices a suite of ICD-10 preparation tools. Now anyone with an iPhone or iPad running iOS8 can easily test their readiness and train staff for the October 1deadline, free of charge. Customers of AdvancedMD practice management software can also leverage the app to add ICD-10 codes to their charge slip templates.

“ADP AdvancedMD has been a leader in the ICD-10 transition process and a champion of independent physicians and small practices, with such tools as MyICD10.AdvancedMD.com, a website aimed at helping medical practices prepare for the ICD-10 transition, featuring a timeline and a wealth of tools, training and tips to help practices prepare for the change,” said Raul Villar, president, ADP AdvancedMD. “With less than half of all practices ready for the change, we saw a need for a tool that would aid the entire community of independent physicians in their progress.”

The app was created as part of the ADP AdvancedMD iCommit program, which offers incentives to engineers for independently pursuing innovations in addition to their regular jobs.

“We decided that there should be a tool to help everyone prepare for the change to ICD-10 and give our community the ability to gauge their readiness,” said Barlow Tucker, software engineer, ADP AdvancedMD. “A free app was the clear choice because it’s easy to access and use, plus it allows people to get an ICD-10 ‘checkup’ at any time.”

The AdvancedMD ICD-10 Toolkit allows users to:

– Track preparedness for ICD-10
– Compare ICD-9 codes with the ICD-10 equivalents, including risk of increased specificity
– View potential high-risk areas
– Search for ICD-10 codes and sub codes
– View articles and action plans to guide a specific transition

Download the new AdvancedMD ICD-10 Toolkit app for iPad®, iPhone®, and iPod Touch® available for free on the Apple app store.


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Drchrono uses Apple Touch ID to let doctors into electronic health record

Drchrono uses Apple Touch ID to let doctors into electronic health record | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Apple opened up the Touch ID fingerprint reader to third-party developers when it released iOS 8, and some in the health care world are beginning to take advantage of it.

Drchrono, which makes an electronic health record optimized for use on iPads, has now used that capability to authenticate doctors into the patient record — and to keep unauthorized users out.

This may be part of a wider push by Apple to get iPhone 6s and iPads into the tech arsenals of enterprises like large medical groups and hospitals. The new iPad Air 2 and the iPad Mini 3 now come with Touch ID, as do the iPhone 5s, iPhone 6, and iPhone 6 Plus.

Where the medical record is concerned, the Touch ID button could be hugely effective in providing secure yet easy access. For care providers using drchrono, three taps will get them into the medical record. They rest their finger on Touch ID to get into the iPad, tap the drchrono EHR app, and then, when the app is open, they hit Touch ID once more to get into the EHR. They no longer have to enter a passcode.

“The amazing thing about Touch ID is that people sometimes forget password and PIN codes,” Drchrono COO and cofounder Daniel Kivatinos wrote on the company’s blog. “This changes the game even more … touch technology in health care.”


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Drchrono Announces EHR for Apple Watch to Improve Doctor Visits

Drchrono Announces EHR for Apple Watch to Improve Doctor Visits | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

drchrono, an award­-winning Electronic Health Record (EHR) which includes all of the benefits of billing, practice management and an records in one place, will be the first to offer an integrated EHR on Apple Watch on April 24. The company is a leader in health technology: they were the first to build a native electronic health records (EHR) application for the iPad, offer developers an open healthcare API, a first-and-only EHR integration with Square and data sync with Box.


The drchrono Apple Watch app will revolutionize the physician office experience by providing automated, real-time communication between healthcare providers and patients. Physicians will be able to quickly view a patient’s information on their wrist, respond to patient messages via quick text and view a patient’s prescription refill request, all without having to access the EHR on their phone, iPad or web. As such, the app will be a seamless extension of the drchrono ipad, ipad, web and cloud experience.


“The drchrono Apple Watch app was designed with doctors’ busy lives in mind and is intended to make medical professionals more productive, efficient and organized,”  says Michael Nusimow, co-founder and CEO of drchrono. “Doctors are incredibly busy;  drchrono on Apple Watch gives them insights about their practice and patients just by checking their wrist. Its simply amazing to have a hands free way to gather quick insights about a patient.”


Each Apple Watch “mode” will be utilized to optimize for a physician seeing patients or on-rounds. For instance, “Glance”, which is the watch’s quick view mode will offer doctors a snapshot of their schedule. “Short Look Notifications” or short reminders, will be used to display chats or messages generated from the EHR app; a common use case could be chat messages from colleagues reminding doctors to wrap things up in advance of their next appointment. Finally, the “Long Look Notifications” mode, will offer a doctor a view of the app itself.

The drchrono Apple Watch app will be available from the Apple Watch App Store on April 24.


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New Medical Tech Not Hard to Swallow, Just to Implement

New Medical Tech Not Hard to Swallow, Just to Implement | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

The "always on" smartphone world of today matched with personal digital diagnostic technologies in development by the likes of Microsoft, Apple, Google, and other digital powerhouses promise to revolutionize chronic disease management and empower population health to stratospheric levels.

The development initiatives using data created and transmitted via smartphones using wearable, clothing embedded, ingestible, and other personal sensors are limited more by imagination than technology.

Just one little problem: The ability to convert another tsunami of new patient data into usable and actionable information for physicians using existing EHR technology is more than a decade in the rearview. The existing system platforms are static warehouses, not digital highways.

Further, each EHR's warehouse is an island unto itself because it uses a different layout, nomenclature, and even language designed to make changing to a competitor as difficult as possible by making data migration to a new system an expensive and daunting process. Until Congress stepped in, exorbitant ransoms imposed by some EHR companies to translate the data into the standard language are effectively bad memories.

The Wall of Interoperability

Still, federal law, which prescribes that all EHR data is to be contained in a standard format called a CCDA (Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture, if you must know), to be certified. The law, however, has more loopholes than grandma's knitting.

That makes the new healthcare information highways, population health, and similar programs that convert EHR warehoused data into usable information for physicians and other healthcare providers (among a host of other enabling and time-saving features), the ultimate solution hobbled by that EHR industry manufactured wall to data called "interoperability."

Circumventing EHR companies by automating removal of the CCDAs out of EHR systems has been solved by a very clever few, as has even making them interactive, but it comes at a cost because each version of each EHR has to be done separately.

To achieve a single-keystroke model (inputting data only one time), which is not only desirable but the only way to get people to use it, tons of EHR data has to be machine translated into a common language, delimited, mapped, parsed, validated, and, finally, populated into a common platform so that it can be made into something useful for providers. Every day. That takes lots of time, money, and skill, which can be undone by EHR companies at will every time they issue an upgrade, new version, or even a simple update — and expensively redone.

In return, providers get useful, time-saving tools that can allow them to do much more in much less time, which is the key to a reasonable quality of life for physicians.

That makes effective population health, let alone enhancing it by new wireless, personal smartphone app-enabled diagnostics, equivalent to baking a cake by having to get and process the raw ingredients from farmers and dairies instead of a cake mix from the supermarket.

The obvious solution, of course, is to pull the data directly into the information manufacturers' systems, circumventing the EHR warehouses, which will be hoisted by their own petard in the open ocean without a paddle because information systems cannot be EHR-specific to be effective.

In the end, there is a bright future for developers, physicians, healthcare providers and, especially, patients.

EHR companies? They took a different road. The survivors will join the program, and the time to do so is so very close.


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iPad & iPhone EHR Medical Records Apple Touch ID

iPad & iPhone EHR Medical Records Apple Touch ID | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Apple now introduced the biometric “Touch ID” onto the new iPad, latest iPad Air 2 and the iPad Mini 3.  Touch ID is also on the iPhone 5s, iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus.

What is Touch ID? Touch ID is a little biometric finger print reader on the new iOS devices:

  • iPad Air 2
  • iPad Mini 3
  • iPhone 5S
  • iPhone 6
  • iPhone 6 Plus

With Touch ID, you can now do more with just the touch of a finger, you can log in and verify identity in logging into apps. Touch ID is that little metal ring around the home button on the new iOS devices.

With the introduction of “Touch ID” onto the new iPad we have added something amazing. With three taps you can get into a medical record. You will touch once with Touch ID to get into the iPad, tap the drchrono EHR app, once the app is launched, then with Touch ID, get into their EHR. Only three taps, no typing a passcode.

This video show off Touch ID in action:

This feature was also added to the onpatient Personal Health Record.

This video shows off Touch ID on the PHR in action

 

The great thing about Touch ID is that it only takes a few minutes to setup. To setup Touch ID EHR follow this video, this video applies to all iOS devices with Touch ID, in the video I am showing how you can use an iPhone 6 to setup Touch ID EHR, it is the same for the new iPad Air 2 and iPad Mini 3:

I spoke about Touch ID a number of months ago, it is now a reality and changing the world.

The amazing thing about Touch ID is that people sometimes forget password and pin codes. This changes the game even more of touch technology in healthcare.



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