EHR and Health IT Consulting
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Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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EHR Interoperability Stalled Due to Information Blocking

EHR Interoperability Stalled Due to Information Blocking | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

When it comes to the practice of medicine and drug discovery, the federal government plays a role in supporting these sectors and developing legislation that opens up avenues for healthcare professionals and scientific researchers. The House Committee on Energy and Commerce has gone forward with creating legislation called 21st Century Cures that delves directly into stimulating the discovery and development of new treatments and medications for patients across the nation. The legislation also impacts the expansion of EHR interoperability.

While the intentions of the 21st Century Cures legislation is beneficial for drug discovery, the American Hospital Association (AHA) finds that the enforcement strategies under the proposed rules could have negative consequences for providers, particularly in its aim to expand EHR interoperability.

AHA Executive Vice President Rick Pollack stated in a letter to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce that, which the organization appreciates the inclusion of EHR interoperability expansion, the “enforcement mechanisms” could lead to issues for healthcare providers such as putting together an ecosystem in which doctors may be significantly penalized for minor errors.

AHA does support health information exchange and EHR interoperability in pursuit of improving patient outcomes and incorporating new models of care. Nonetheless, AHA finds some issues with the enforcement related to vendors participating in information blocking problematic.

“The bill includes a number of enforcement mechanisms against those who engage in information blocking,” wrote AHA Executive Vice President Rick Pollack in the letter. “On the provider side, we believe that the use of Medicare fraud and abuse mechanisms, such as investigations by the Office of the Inspector General, imposition of civil monetary penalties or exclusion from the Medicare program, is unnecessary and inappropriate to address the concerns that the legislation seeks to remedy. We recommend that you use the existing structures of the meaningful use program to promote information sharing.”

On behalf of AHA, Pollack mentions that the organization appreciates the committee’s aim to ensure EHR vendors are responsible for creating interoperable health IT products. However, Pollack also stated that the committee should instruct the Federal Trade Commission to analyze any anti-competitive behavior among EHR vendors. In particular, Pollack finds the decertification of EHR systems among vendors that participated in information blocking objectionable, as it would affect healthcare providers and disrupt patient care.

“The language also includes decertification as a sanction for vendors that engage in information blocking. Decertification would be disruptive to hospitals and physicians that have invested in and deployed an EHR that is later decertified,” Pollack explained. “However, the inclusion of provider protections against meaningful use penalties if their EHR is decertified makes it more reasonable.”

The protections against payment penalties under the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs would last for more than one year, which would give providers ample time to find a new vendor, develop a suitable contract, install another EHR system, and attest to relevant meaningful use requirements.

Additionally, AHA would like the definition of information blocking to become narrower in order to avoid charges of fraud to be dealt due to standard business practices. Essentially, AHA would like to reduce some of the punitive approaches the committee set forth and develop more positive approaches to expanding health information exchange.


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Important Features For Your Practice Computers

Important Features For Your Practice Computers | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Medical computers are an essential element of the modern health care system. They help increase efficiency in every setting from the front office to exam rooms, surgery, and radiology departments. Choosing computers for your practice is an important task, so here are some features to look for:


Sanitation Promoting Features


A clean environment is indisputable in health care facilities, and a critical component of a medical grade computer is their ability to support one. Hygiene-promoting features on your practice computers should include the following:


  • Sealed enclosure resistant to liquid and can be cleaned with disinfectant.
  • Antimicrobial coating on keyboards and monitors or all-in-one computers.
  • Fanless design to reduce dirt accumulation in the system and dust from circulating.
  • Minimal crevices that are potential homes for bacteria.


Mobility and Accessibility


When medical computers are mobile and accessible, health care organizations can save time, money and improve patient care. Nurses and doctors can bring computers with them on patient rounds or during check-in. This accessibility in medical computers lets doctors and nurses focus on patients, not hardware, during appointments. Look for computers that fit into a variety of settings, whether they can be placed on wall mounts, medical carts or nursing stations. VESA mountable computers are the preferred industry standard. The medical computer supplier you choose should offer assistance in installing your computers where you need them. Also, check for an internal lithium battery that allows for mobility without interrupting data management.

Touchscreens are another significant option that lets caregivers focus on patients. When they are easy to use, caregivers can easily enter data and interact with the computer, while still giving attention to patients. Medical Computer touchscreens are also more hygienic since they can come with an antibacterial coating.


Administrative Tools


A high performing and efficient hospital or clinic has central coordination, and medical grade computers reinforce this. With medical grade computers, administrative staff can enter and edit a patient’s medical, insurance and billing information in a patient environment. Each computer on the network should have access to this information, with a setup that allows for HIPAA compliance. Elimination of redundant inputs, reduction of errors and the switch to electronic rather than paper billings all save costs.


Low-Cost Installation


While changing to a medical computer system or getting an overhaul of your current system will undoubtedly involve some expense, you can minimize it in a few ways. One is by choosing a system compatible with as much of your existing systems as possible. For example, inquire about the extent of inputs and outputs that would be necessary with a new system; you may be able to make use of parts of your current system and thus save trouble and money from redundant equipment purchases.


Another way to reduce the initial investment cost is to consider the time and resources required to get doctors and other employees able to operate the system. First, software should be easy to use. Look for medical grade computers that support your preferred software programs or that come with new software that is simple to learn. Insist on getting a free trial before committing to a purchase.

Second, be sure to train employees before your upgrade is complete. Extra time from tutorials is expensive to a hospital or clinic, so find out how long it typically takes for users to master the system. If possible, purchase your medical computers from a company that provides follow-up support..


Cloud-Based Systems


Your practice computers need to be compatible with the cloud. As recently explained on this site, 96 percent of health care organizations are using or considering the cloud. Those who do can hope for average cost savings of 20 percent each year.


Using the cloud has additional advantages over cost savings. It allows for unlimited storage and frequent backups. Also, storage on a remote server rather than a large server on site prevents the risk of losing data in case of a flood, fire, etc. Check for a computer with EN/UL 60601 medical certification with which protects against power surges, failures and improves on-site safety.


A quality medical grade computer has a number of important characteristics that allow for reduced costs and upgraded patient care. Keep a list of necessary features in mind when you shop for your new computer or system, and your health care organization may soon see benefits.


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