EHR and Health IT Consulting
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EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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5 Steps to EHR Data Conversion

5 Steps to EHR Data Conversion | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

EHR data conversion is the process of moving patient data from legacy EHR system to a new EHR system. While automated EHR data conversion seems like a complex affair, it doesn’t have to be. When an experienced vendor partners with strong internal leadership, the data conversion will follow a proven, 5-step process, and the data will undergo a failsafe ETL.

Why Change EHR?

Healthcare providers are expected to document patient encounters. Traditionally, this documentation has been completed on paper and stored in file cabinets. However, the last decade has seen significant growth in provider adoption of Electronic Health Records (EHRs). The combination of government incentives, advances in technology, and improved outcomes and operations have fueled this growth.

When healthcare providers have access to complete and accurate information, patients receive better care and have better outcomes. EHRs improve providers’ ability to diagnose disease and reduce medical errors. EHRs further help providers meet patient demands, provide decision support, improve communication, and aid in regulatory reporting.

While EHR adoption has increased, so too has the need to change systems while maintaining the access to and integrity of patient health information. Healthcare administrators point to provider dissatisfaction and mergers and acquisitions as the primary contributors for changing EHR providers within their organization. In preparing for the implementation of a new EHR, healthcare organizations have been grappling with how to handle the data in the legacy systems.

What is EHR Data Conversion?

In response to this challenge, many healthcare organizations are turning to automated EHR data conversion to maintain data integrity. An automated ETL (Extract, Transform, Load) process avoids risks related to data manipulation, because not a single patient record is touched.

 

In an automated conversion, source values are extracted from both the legacy (source) system and new (target) system to create a conversion map. That map is entered into a conversion utility software. Data from the legacy system is run through the conversion utility and transformed to meet the needs of the new system. While it is being transformed, the conversion utility is monitoring for errors and estimated completion. After the data has met the standards, it is then loaded into the new system.

The process of an automated EHR data conversion may seem like a complicated and difficult undertaking. It doesn’t have to be when it is handled by an experienced vendor working with strong internal leadershipundergoing a recognized data conversion process.

5 Steps to EHR Data Conversion

1. Discovery

During the discovery phase of the process, the healthcare organization team will play a large role. An EHR vendor will ask internal IT staff to extract all data from the current system. Working together with an internal designated leader, IT staff, and Physicians Advisory Committee (PAC), the data conversion vendor will work to identify how much data is available, what data needs to be converted, and the accuracy of the legacy data.

2. Scope Definition

The scope definition phase of the process is the point at which both parties come to an agreement on which portions of the data need to be converted, the method of the conversion, and the prioritization of the data. During this time, the two teams should schedule time to review the records, format them to meet the new formatting requirements, and set the processes to updated record fields not available in the conversion.

3. Testing

Once the scope has been fully defined, and the formatting requirements are completely understood, the primary responsibility of the conversion then shifts to the vendor. Based on the input gathered during the scope definition step, the data architects working for the vendor will map the data fields and formatting from the old system to equivalent data fields and formatting in the new systems. After the map has been created, the data architects upload the test conversion data to a testing site.

4. Validation

This step is a shared responsibility between the healthcare organization and EHR data conversion vendor. Once the data has been loaded to the test site, the data architects validate the data. Then the healthcare organization leaders review the content, validate the records, and sign off on the final data set. This step may require several cycles. However, it is imperative for the success of the conversion.

5. Migration

Once the data has been validated, the vendor will executive the final migration. While the data is migrating, the vendor’s conversion utility should be monitoring total errors, parsing errors, mapping misses, percent complete, date/time to finish, and success rate. When all the data is converted and migrated to the new system, the healthcare organization will go live!

Throughout the EHR data conversion process, healthcare organizations are tasked with making important, and often tough, decisions about how to handle data, the methods of conversion, and data prioritization. It is important that healthcare organizations plan ahead, schedule the necessary time, and work closely with EHR data conversion vendors who are well versed in the each step of the process.

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How To Measure What We Cannot See In Healthcare

How To Measure What We Cannot See In Healthcare | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

These days it seems that everyone in healthcare is buzzing about big data and analytics, and no wonder. Transforming, if not reimagining, healthcare is going to take everything we’ve got. Achieving the triple aim of higher quality, better access and lower cost of care cannot be done without being able to measure what we do. As the old adage says, “if you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it”. To that I might add, “if you can’t see it, you can’t improve it”.

 

Anyone who has walked the halls of a hospital or clinic knows there is no shortage of data. We just aren’t very good at knowing exactly how to get our arms around it. Data is only meaningful if it is organized in ways that we can truly comprehend what it is telling us. Today, the smart money is on technologies that help us visualize and therefore understand data without the need of a PhD in advanced analytics.

 

One such tool is something we call Power Map for Excel. This 3D visualization add-in is now a centerpiece (along with Power View, Power Query, and Power Pivot,) within the business intelligence capabilities ofMicrosoft Power BI in Excel.

 

Information workers with their data in Excel have realized the potential of Power Map to identify insights in geospatial and time-based data that traditional 2D charts cannot communicate. For instance, digital marketers can better target and time their campaigns while environmentally-conscious companies can fine-tune energy-saving programs across peak usage times. These are just a few of the examples of how location-based data is coming alive for customers using Power Map and distancing them from their competitors who are still staring blankly at a flat table, chart, or map.

 

Please take a look at the video below. Then ask yourself, what if instead of mapping U.S. Power Production we were looking at:

 

  • Syndromic surveillance of the geospatial distribution and severity of an infectious disease

 

  • A real-time map of a hospital system’s nosocomial infection rate

 

  • A representation of the incidence of chronic disease plotted against the geographic distribution of toxins in air, soil and water

 

  • A facilities, capabilities and occupancy map of a region’s readiness for accountable care
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American EHR Call For Submissions.

American EHR Call For Submissions. | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Do you have a story to tell or experiences using health information technology? How would you like to share those experiences with American EHR’s 26,000+ members who represent all 52 states and territories and 152 medical specialties?

 

Whether positive or negative, shared experiences surrounding the usage of EHR’s or other technologies such as mobile apps or web-based tools are extremely valuable to clinicians, ancillary caregivers, and staff who work in clinical patient settings.

 

Whether you’re a primary care clinician, a practice administrator, or a technology expert, please take a few moments to share your experiences and insights.

 

What are we looking for?

 

500–700 word articles on topics such as the following:

  • Interopability
  • Connected Health
  • E-Prescribing
  • Data exchange (or the lack thereof)
  • Clinical decision support
  • Clinical mobile apps
  • Tips on time-saving
  • Areas in which technology use is challenging
  • Interacting with patients using portals or personal health records
  • MACRA and Meaningful Use

 

All submissions are reviewed by our editorial team prior to publication, and must be educational in nature. Open to clinicians, practice managers, consultants, CIO’s, or other health IT professionals.

 

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A Successful Approach to EHR Data Conversion - Healthcare Technology Consulting, EHR Implementation & Vendor Selection

A Successful Approach to EHR Data Conversion  - Healthcare Technology Consulting, EHR Implementation & Vendor Selection | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

As the field of healthcare IT continues to grow, there is an increasing demand for healthcare organizations to implement electronic health records (EHR). In order to ensure a successful transition into a new EHR, organizations must include the process of data conversion into their implementation plan. EHR data conversion, so

 

metimes referred to as data migration, is the process of taking data from an old health record system and transferring it into a new system. This process may occur between paper-ba

sed health records and an EHR as well as between an old EHR and a new EHR. At Afia, we have worked with multiple companies to assist with numerous data conversions. Though all conversion processes are not created equal, we have developed a three-step approach to help make the complexities easier to manage.

First Step: Establish the Scope of Data

This step is crucial and must occur at the forefront of the data conversion process. Initially, organizations must select what specific data they want converted. Organizations may decide to covert as little information as possible or they may want the scope to be more overarching and exhaustive. If there is data deemed useless in the legacy system, it is important to take note of this since some organizations may decide to not transfer such data over to the new system. It is also important to determine what level of data cleanliness the organization is comfortable with. Deciding on the level of cleanliness for data saves organizations time from fixing parts of data that don’t necessarily have to be fixed and can dramatically reduce the amount of time it takes for a successful conversion. Additionally, some parts of converting the data will have to be done manually. It’s important to outline in detail what the automated pieces of the conversion process cannot handle. Inevitably, there will be a handful of things that need to be hand entered for one reason or another. The manual conversion pieces can often get lost during the rush to get the other data converted, but without careful planning you can easily find yourself without critical information in the new system. Defining the scope at the beginning of this process prevents organizations from having to redo work and saves organizations precious time and money. It can be a painful process to get everything organized properly, but it can easily derail your entire system launch without proper planning.

Second Step: Map Out the Conversion

This requires organizations to determine where data from the legacy system will be inserted in the new system to ensure that data is properly transferred between the two systems. This part of the process focuses on making sure that the new system houses data in a way that is easy to find and interpret by healthcare personnel. Often, this requires database professionals to manipulate tables to ensure that data is transferred in the correct manner.

Third Step: Extract the Data

The last step of our approach is to extract the data from the legacy system and place it into the new system. At this point, the computer will inform organizations when data is incorrect which will require database professionals to manipulate tables to accommodate such findings or to manually change the data to ensure it is placed in the new system correctly. This is where the level of cleanliness is relevant. The level of cleanliness that the organization decides upon will influence how many extractions are required. Typically, multiple extractions are needed to ensure data is clean enough for an organization’s liking. The number of extractions will also determine the time, money, and number of people dedicated to data conversion project.

HIPAA Requirements

Lastly, it is important to keep in mind that all HIPAA requirements apply whenever discussing protected health information (PHI). Since PHI is the main source of discussion during a data conversion, it is of utmost importance that all individuals participating in the data conversion are aware of how to avoid HIPAA breaches. The most important aspect of abiding by HIPAA requirements is to ensure that the data conversion is occurring in a secure place where vendors and organizations can sort through errors and communicate about specific client information. Through experience and creative thinking, Afia has created a reliable approach to data conversion that helps to navigate through an unpredictable process. We offer data conversion services for all parts of the process and can oversee organizations through the entire process. Afia also offers our Cloud Services where organizations have the option to host their PHI with us in our secure server space to avoid HIPAA breaches.

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Should You Test Your EHR Data Backup and Restore Process?

Should You Test Your EHR Data Backup and Restore Process? | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

It’s common knowledge that backing up data for your medical practice is critical forprotecting against devastating losses of patient data in the event of a natural disaster, system glitch, or hardware failure. But practices should go further than simply backing their data up; testing these backup and restoration processes is just as important for ensuring data safety as the initial backup itself.

 

Why Backups are Important

 

For practices that utilize EHRs, having backups is critical for a number of reasons. While the first scenario that many imagine is a catastrophic loss of data resulting from a server malfunction or local event, this is not the only reason to have a data backup.

Experts recommend backups to protect againstsecurity breaches or viruses, to provide continuity of care across multiple providers or in the event of an outage, andthe protection ofvaluable assets for research and analytics.

Medical practices should establish scheduled, automatic backups as well as perform manual backups after making any system changes.

 

Your Backup is Only as Good as its Restore

 

When preparing an EHR data backup procedure, it’s important to remember that the value of your backup is congruous to the quality of the restore. A backup is no good if the restore is incompatible with current hardware or software, which is just one example of what can go wrong.

 

Particularly for practices using an EHR vendor, it’s essential to confirm compatibility of the restore with current systems. This restore must also be promptly accessible, and establishing synchronization with an EHR vendor is importantfor this timeliness. Checking post-restore integrity as a routine part of testing can ensure that once your restore is complete, your data will be accessible and useable.

 

How Will You Know if Your Backup is Good?

 

One of the most effective ways to know if your backup is good is to run a test. The test should exercise the system using common work processes that access multiple types of data.  The worst case is when a practice believes they have beensuccessfully backing up their data, only to find out that the backups are incomplete.

 

Other restore fail scenarios include practices that have discovered that theyhave only been backing up their software (URL: http://www.americanehr.com/blog/2011/12/data-backup-information-protection/), not their data. This kind of loss can be devastating for patients and providers alike, and regularly running tests can protect against these situations.

 

Scheduling Your Backups

 

Aside from testing the functionality of backups,strategically determining the times that these systems will run will prevent interference with staff or clinic activities. Frequency also depends on how much data the practice can afford to lose. If a backup runs weekly, this means that a worst-case scenario could result in the loss of six days’ worth of data.

 

Depending on practice volume, agenda, and other factors, setting goals and quantifiable standards for backups ensures alignment with best practices.

 

Conclusion

 

Protection against disaster-borne data loss, along with the convenience of external management,has led many practices to choose third parties or their EHR vendor to administrate backups.  Don’t rely on external entities to validate your backups.  Internally test and verify your systems restore process too.

 

At ZH Healthcare, our BlueEHS services offer complete peace of mind with multiple layers of protection, including automated backups and “snapshot” components which can be used to restore your systems quickly. In addition, we offer on-demand download access from the cloud, and in-house data storage. 

 

 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

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The Critical Importance of Comprehensive EHR Survey Data 

The Critical Importance of Comprehensive EHR Survey Data  | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

In order to respond to the question of survey populations, I would like to provide a summary of the survey oversight and governance process as well as a more detailed explanation of the methodology that American EHR uses to conduct EHR surveys.

 

  • American EHR Partners is a vendor neutral eHealth data organization that has been collecting information around EHR systems for over 5 years. Over 5,800 verified clinicians surveys have been completed since the launch of the site in 2010. All of the data collected is free for physicians and professional associations. American EHR Partners does not endorse any products or services. The program provides ratings on certified EHR systems. Ratings are based primarily on surveys of physicians conducted through their professional societies. Ratings are displayed on all EHR vendors regardless of their participation in the program.

 

  • Ratings are only displayed once a minimum number ‘n’ of survey responses have been received; the current minimum value is ten ratings. The rating scores are aggregated from the relevant questions asked on the physician user surveys, and these questions are available to the public. The ‘n’ is presented for all product ratings to assist the user when interpreting the rating data.

 

  • From time-to-time, American EHR Partners develops reports based upon the data collected.

 

  • American EHR Partners has a stringent governance process. Four advisory groups have been established to provide feedback on the American EHR Partners program. These are: Physician Advisory, Professional Society Advisory, EHR Vendors Advisory and a Healthcare Stakeholder advisory that includes national organizations not represented in the first three advisory groups.

 

  • All professional society participants, automatically have a seat on the society advisory group. The purpose of this advisory board is to guide American EHR from a specialty and subspecialty perspective and to provide guidance on education, collaborative initiatives and future development in relation to specialty and subspecialty physician groups.

 

Survey sample selection

 

When conducting a survey in conjunction with a professional society partner, for example the Physician Use of EHR Systems report, a randomized sample of members from each participating organization are surveyed. As the professional society partners are regularly surveying their members on a variety of topics, and in order to prevent over-surveying, each provides a random sample of members with active email addresses in order to conduct the American EHR survey. Each survey group receives an initial invitation to complete the survey as well as 1-2 reminders. Because the sample is selected randomly from the member database, we expect that some individuals will not be using EHRs. These individuals are excluded in the survey registration process. While it is desirable to be able to survey an entire professional organization’s membership, this is not possible due to the number of additional surveys that each organization conducts of their members as well as the issue of survey fatigue.

 

Prior to collection of data for the Physician Use of EHR Systems  report, an extensive review process was undertaken to update the American EHR survey in conjunction with the American Medical Association, American College of Physicians and the American Academy of Family Physicians. In particular, American EHR worked with AMA Market Research staff to formulate new questions designed to examine the economic impact of EHR use and the role of scribes. In order to keep the overall length of the survey at its current level, AMA and American  EHR agreed to eliminate questions that were not effective and/or addressed in other parts of the American EHR  survey.

 

When the 155 question survey is conducted, all physicians are verified either directly in conjunction with their professional society through a verified sample, against the AMA Physician Masterfile or in limited situations through a manual process.

Due to the comprehensive nature of the EHR survey, the survey takes approximately 20 minutes to complete. However, the detailed nature of the data collected also provides key insights into the adoption and use of EHR systems by clinicians in varying practice sizes and by specialty.

 

We stand steadfastly behind the methodology, process, collection of data as well as the interpretation of the results as presented in our most recent report. In particular, we believe that the ability to survey physicians in conjunction with their professional organizations provides the most relevant and representative information on actual experiences in the use of EHRs.

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Health Alerts App Brings Public Health Notifications to Your Mobile Device. 

Health Alerts App Brings Public Health Notifications to Your Mobile Device.  | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

I’m now excited to announce that AmericanEHR has recently released a mobile app called Health Alerts. The AmericanEHR Health Alerts app brings you timely information on outbreaks and incidents on public health emergency topics, including: diseases, infections, natural disasters, drug recalls, travel medicine, and more. This information is pulled directly from live feeds provided by the world’s most trusted sources for public health information, including:

 

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  • World Health Organization (WHO)
  • US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
  • International Society for Infectious Diseases (ISID)
  • US Department of Agriculture (USDA)
  • US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
  • International Society of Travel Medicine (ISTM)
  • European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)
  • Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
  • And many more…

 

It is projected that a coordinated outbreak prevention strategy can help save tens of thousands of lives annually. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that by preventing infections from antibiotic-resistant germs through more efficient coordination among healthcare facilities and public health departments, as much as 80 percent of infections could be prevented in the next five years.

 

AmericanEHR’s Health Alerts app can not only slash the spread of these types of diseases and infections, but it provides clinicians, the public, health agencies and healthcare facilities with real time alerts and updates to stop outbreaks in their tracks. Being aware of the latest health bulletins and the symptoms to keep a watchful eye open for means lower healthcare costs, and faster, more accurate responses to health threats as they materialize.

 

The AmericanEHR Health Alerts app is free to use with an AmericanEHR account. The app is available for iOS (Apple) devices such as iPhone, iPad, and iPad Mini. It’s currently in limited release to select clinicians and patients as we gather feedback from the medical community.

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