EHR and Health IT Consulting
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EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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Effects of Interoperability on Health Data Privacy Policies | EHRintelligence.com

Effects of Interoperability on Health Data Privacy Policies | EHRintelligence.com | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Interoperability enables healthcare providers to make the most well-informed decisions for individual patients, but it introduces the potential for sensitive patient health data to become compromised if the technologies exchanging information or the pipeline between these systems are unsecured.

“In terms of what I think some of those challenges are, it’s no big secret; we’re working on interoperability,” Lucia Savage, the new Chief Privacy Officer for the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, recently told HealthITSecurity.com.

“Of course there are the topics that have been well-discussed in the press, like data lock and all that stuff that have to with people’s proprietary systems,” she continued. “But what’s really more essential in the privacy and security realm is making sure people understand how are current legal and regulatory environment actually help support interoperability — right now, at this very moment in time.”

New models for care delivery (e.g., accountable care organizations) emphasize the need for interoperable EHR and health IT systems, added Savage. Interoperability, however, is limited to certain geographies and contexts. In short, there is tremendous room for improvement.

“For example, insurance companies contract with large systems to the ACOs. For that to succeed, just like the Medicare ACOs, data has to flow between the two parties,” Savage explained. “That data is flowing right now in some ways, and in some ways it could flow better and could make better use of the delivery system was built with the meaningful use incentive.”

According to the ONC’s Chief Privacy Officer, a lack of health information exchange (HIE) as a result of limited interoperability comes as a surprise to patients who “thought their doctors were doing this already.” And what is essential is that the healthcare organizations and providers, both private and public, make use of new forms of exchanging information while adhering to the privacy and security rules laid out by HIPAA.

“The HIPAA environment we have is perfectly designed for that. It’s media-neutral, meaning 20 years ago when faxes were new, that’s how the information started to move. Now the information is moving through other media but the rule hasn’t changed. We’re going to capitalize on that,” she maintained.

The next step involves the building of trust among providers and patients, which will come with time and use:

When we introduce a pretty significant technological innovation it takes optimally to breed trust. If through interoperability it facilitates physicians engaging their patients through electronic health record systems and the portal, and giving patients access, giving dialogue with patients about their data that they collect and share about themselves, then patients confidence in the system will grow because they’re using it too.

For the ONC, the path forward requires the federal agency to gather information and listen carefully to the insights of subject-matter experts so that the “potential benefits and the possible risks” of a fully interoperable, HIE-enabled healthcare environment are understood and incorporated into emerging and evolving regulation and oversight.

“Most of the people in the know understand well how HIPAA works for these big data analytics, but there’s new sources of data, whether its wearables or patient generated data or the way people want to take a healthcare transactional data and add data from public records systems to it for analytics purposes,” Savage said.

Not only is interoperability a challenge from the technology side of healthcare, but it also presents new challenges to health IT security and privacy.



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Health Data Outside the Doctor’s Office | The Health Care Blog

Health Data Outside the Doctor’s Office | The Health Care Blog | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Health primarily happens outside the doctor’s office—playing out in the arenas where we live, learn, work and play. In fact, a minority of our overall health is the result of the health care we receive.  If we’re to have an accurate picture of health, we need more than what is currently captured in the electronic health record.

That’s why the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) asked the distinguished JASON group to bring its considerable analytical power to bear on this problem: how to create a health information system that focuses on the health of individuals, not just the care they receive. JASON is an independent group of scientists and academics that has been advising the Federal government on matters of science and technology for over 50 years.

Why is it important to pursue this ambitious goal? There has been an explosion of data that could help with all kinds of decisions about health. Right now, though, we do not have the capability to capture and share that data with those who make decisions that impact health—including individuals, health care providers and communities.

The new report, called Data for Individual Health, builds upon the 2013 JASON report, A Robust Health Data Infrastructure.  It lays out recommendations for an infrastructure that could not only achieve interoperability among electronic health records (EHRs), but could also integrate data from all walks of life—including data from personal health devices, patient collaborative networks, social media, environmental and demographic data and genomic and other “omics” data.


This report, done in partnership with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, comes at a pivotal time: ONC is in the process of developing a federal health IT strategic plan and a shared, nationwide interoperability roadmap, which will ensure that information can be securely shared across an emerging health IT infrastructure.

Data sharing is a critical piece of this equation. While we need infrastructure to capture and organize this data, we also need to ensure that individuals, health care professionals and community leaders can access and exchange this data, and use it to make decisions that improve health.

Initiatives like Blue Button and OpenNotes are already empowering patients and allowing them to take a more active role in their care. But giving individuals access to integrated streams of data from inside and outside the doctor’s office can increase the ways in which people engage directly in their own health and wellness.

Broadening data beyond the four walls of the doctors’ office will give health care professionals a more holistic view of their patient’s health. Sharing that data among members of the health care team will also lead to greater care coordination. Ensuring this data is used in meaningful ways will of course require training our health care workforce to a higher level of quantitative literacy.

Efforts now underway like County Health Rankings guide community leaders in setting priorities for improving health. With access to more data, communities can make faster, smarter decisions that support health—creating healthier homes, schools, workplaces and neighborhoods. For example, if a city wants to plan bike infrastructure, they could invest millions in conducting studies into where bike lanes should go, or they instead could quickly access information generated by bikers, such as Map My Ride or Strava, to see where people are actually riding.

While there are an enormous number of uses for the data that we can imagine and many more we cannot yet anticipate, it will be vitally important that we all make every effort to protect the privacy and security of these data. The report highlights numerous ways to protect the data in ways that benefit health and wellness, while also prompting accelerated innovation.

We’re excited by the potential to take this emerging data and turn it into useable information to build a Culture of Health—a nation where everyone has the opportunity to live longer, healthier lives.

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Institute for Critical Infrastructure Technology's curator insight, December 8, 2014 10:13 AM

for more news on critical infrastructure see the Institute for Critical Infrastructure Technology blog http://icitech.org/latest-critical-infrastructure-news-cybersecurity-healthcare/