EHR and Health IT Consulting
38.9K views | +0 today
Follow
EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scoop.it!

Why Don’t 35% of Patients Know that Patient Portals Exist? | EHRintelligence.com

Why Don’t 35% of Patients Know that Patient Portals Exist? | EHRintelligence.com | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it
Patient portals are becoming important tools for engagement and population health, but patients are largely unaware of the technology.

While patients are generally enthusiastic about viewing their EHR data and engaging with their providers online, a concerning number of patients are unaware of the possibilities of using a patient portal, finds a new survey from Xerox.  Among the 64 percent of patients who are not portal users, 35 percent did not know a portal was available to them, and 31 percent stated that their providers had never mentioned the technology to them.  Despite the widespread lack of knowledge, 57 percent of non-users said they would be more engaged and more proactive in their own healthcare if they had access to their data online.

“With providers facing regulatory changes, mounting costs, and patients who increasingly seek access to more information, our survey points to an opportunity to address issues by simply opening dialogue with patients about patient portals,” said Tamara St. Claire, Chief Innovation Officer of Commercial Healthcare for Xerox. “Educating patients will empower them to participate more fully in their own care while helping providers demonstrate that electronic health records are being used in a meaningful way.”

The survey indicates a generation gap when it comes to how patients use online tools.  While baby boomers are more likely to view patient portals as a utilitarian feature by making appointments online (70 percent), refilling prescriptions (58 percent), and communicating through emails with their physicians (60 percent), millennials view portals as an informational hub.  Younger patients want to see personalized information (44 percent), tailored care plans, details about related services from their providers (44 percent), and industry news that might relate to their issues and concerns (23 percent).

Perhaps surprisingly, baby boomers, aged 55 to 64, were among the most frequent users of patient portals.  Eighty-three percent of this age group indicated that they already do or would be very interested in communicating with their healthcare providers through a portal.  Millennials were more likely to want mobile access to online tools, with 43 percent stating their preference for smartphone and tablet interfaces.

Providers can help to shape patient engagement – and help themselves to meet the 5 percent patient engagement threshold included in Stage 2 meaningful use – by taking the time to educate patients about their options and opportunities.  Reinforcing the idea of signing up for a patient portal account at multiple points along the patients’ journey through the office, from check-in to follow-up, can help to secure a patient’s interest.  And physicians themselves should take the lead, St. Claire asserts.

“Physicians just aren’t having that dialogue,” she said to HealthITAnalytics.  “When we look at some of the best practices out there, we see that having that conversation multiple times along the patient’s path through the office is most effective.  And we think having that conversation directly with their physician is going to be most important.  People really want to hear it from their physician, because they’re that trusted source.  Even as medicine is changing, having that talk with the physician is probably going to have the most impact.”



more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Patients want online access to records | Healthcare IT News

Patients want online access to records | Healthcare IT News | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

More than half of people with chronic conditions say the ability to get their electronic medical records online outweighs the potential privacy risks, according to a new survey by Accenture.

Two-thirds, meanwhile, believe patients should have the right to access all of their healthcare information.

The results of the poll suggest a public increasingly frustrated by lack of sovereignty over their own health data.



The vast majority people surveyed by Accenture – 87 percent – say they want to control their health data. But 55 percent report they don't have very much or any control over their medical information.

Accenture polled 2,011 individuals – 918 of them healthy, and 1,093 with either asthma, arthritis, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, depression, diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, clinically diagnosed obesity, osteoporosis and stroke.

The survey found chronic patients to be less concerned about the privacy of their electronic health records, 65 percent, than they were about other personal information stored digitally, such as online banking (70 percent), in-store credit card use (69 percent) and online shopping (68 percent).

Still, although they're eager to have access to their records online, roughly half of those with chronic conditions said the top barrier to seeing the data was not knowing how to do so.

Accenture's findings also suggest, depending on the type of chronic illness they have, there are differences in a patient's ability to exercise control over his or her healthcare data. For example, 65 percent of consumers with heart disease reported having some level of control, compared to just 49 percent of individuals with COPD.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 47 percent of Americans have at least one chronic disease, but they account for 76 percent of all physician visits.

Nonetheless, these individuals are some of the most actively engaged patients at most stages of patient care, according to the poll – including during medical diagnosis (91 percent), managing treatment (87 percent) and maintaining general health on a day-to-day basis (84 percent).

"Healthcare will need to adapt to a new generation of individuals who are taking a more proactive role in managing their health and expect to have transparency," said Kaveh Safavi MD, who leads Accenture's global health business, in a press statement.

"As consumers continue to demand more access to their personal data online, we expect that patients will gain more power to manage some aspects of their own care," said Safavi. "This will not only make healthcare more effective but also more affordable, as consumers doing more for themselves will free up the system to be more productive."


more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Patient Engagement Rises with Consumer EHR Satisfaction | EHRintelligence.com

Patient Engagement Rises with Consumer EHR Satisfaction | EHRintelligence.com | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it
Patient engagement helps consumers view EHRs more positively and encourages them to take charge of their health.

The overwhelming majority of patients believe that electronic health records (EHRs) are useful for physicians and valuable for their care, according to a newly released survey by the National Partnership for Women and Families.  Patients were more likely to rate EHRs as a positive development when they had online access to personal health information through a portal or if they could perform routine administrative tasks like making appointments through the internet.  The survey illustrates the importance of patient engagement while highlighting the spread of health IT and its potential impact on the nation’s health.

The survey reassesses questions about health IT usages and attitudes that were first posed in 2011.  At that time, only 64% of patients had a primary care doctor who used an EHR, but that number has increased to 80% in 2014.  Patients are significantly more likely to see EHRs as a useful tool for care delivery than they are to say the same thing about paper record keeping.  They are also more likely to think that EHRs are helpful for their physicians, and believe that EHRs are also helpful to achieve their own personal tasks and goals.

Online access to EHRs or patient portals has doubled in the past three years, the data found.  Half of patients can now view or share their information online, and more than half of those patients use the ability three times per year or more.   Patients continue to place a premium on the ability to conduct important tasks through their portals.  Access to online scheduling and prescription management features boosted patient opinions of EHRs by 31 percent.  Fifty-six percent of respondents desired email communication with their provider, while 58% wanted to review physician documentation and a similar number wanted the ability to look at their treatment plans.

Patients who frequently accessed their information online also reported higher levels of motivation to improve their own health.  However, survey participants complained that they did not have the right tools to track personal progress towards their goals, which may indicate an opportunity for developers to better integrate lifestyle and chronic disease management into the patient engagement experience.

“As the National Partnership’s new data show, more consumers are accessing, sharing and using their health information, underlining the importance of interoperability of health data and systems. We are focusing our efforts in these areas to empower individuals to address not only gaps in information exchange and interoperability, but also enable them to take steps to improve their health and better manage their health needs,” said National Coordinator for Health IT Karen DeSalvo in a press release.

“The views of patients must be front and center as we take the next steps in implementing health IT,” added Sandra R. Hernández, President and CEO of the California HealthCare Foundation, which funded the new survey. “As we as a nation become more diverse, the imperative to address disparities grows. We need the kind of robust information EHRs provide and the genuine patient engagement they can facilitate.”



more...
No comment yet.