EHR and Health IT Consulting
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Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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Reduce the Pain of Switching EHR Software with These Four Steps

Reduce the Pain of Switching EHR Software with These Four Steps | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

There are days when you have to face that monster behind the screen. EHR replacement can be a significant challenge for any healthcare executive or IT administrator. The reasons vary—from performance issues to software being discontinued by the vendor.

 

Seeking the right EMR software solution to overcome these problems is becoming more difficult as companies innovate and evolve to meet the demands of an increasingly complex healthcare environment. The whirlwind of options can be confusing as you seek the best EHR software to improve physician productivity, financial outcomes, and patient satisfaction.The following tips will help you find the solution you need to achieve your organization’s goals.

Start your search for a new EHR vendor with these steps

Here are the top recommendations for choosing an EHR vendor to make this change something you only have to do once.

Step 1: Develop a Request for Proposal (RFP)

An RFP allows you to compare potential partners. It provides a framework for providing detailed information about your practice and listing specific requirements. It’s well worth the effort in making sure prospective vendors have guidelines to prepare a proposal that clearly addresses your needs.

Step 2: Give them a wish list

A wish list of key features, functions, and reporting needs gives prospective vendors a full picture of what you expect from a partner. When they respond, you’ll have a better understanding of how their services will fulfill your goals.

Step 3: Research, research, and more research

Go online to read blogs, customer comments, and third-party review sites. Talk with your clinicians and staff to get more details about what works and doesn’t work with the current EHR system. Reach out to peers in professional organizations to learn more from their experiences.

Step 4: Go beyond the sales pitch and get to know the vendor

An EHR solution goes beyond the software. EHR replacement involves the personalities that you’ll be working with on a regular basis. You need to take time to get to know the vendors and make sure they’ll be a good fit for your practice.

Have questions ready

Similar to how a business develops interview questions for to ask a candidate for an important position, your practice needs to prepare a list of specific questions for your potential EHR partner. Here are a few questions to consider:

  • Does the EHR provide robust, specialty content out of the box?
  • Will the partner be able to meet the demands as my practice grows?
  • Does the EHR vendor offer the full end-to-end solution from when the patient arrives to when the payment is collected?
  • Does the EHR vendor ensure a true continuum of care?

A partnership built on trust every step of the way

Switching to the right EHR software to yield better results requires a partner you can trust. Managing the complexity and difficulty in keeping up with workflow demand is possible with a partner who will be there every step of the way. It’s essential that they share the same amount of passion and commitment you have in serving your clinicians, staff, and patients.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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Are Providers Satisfied With Their EHR?

Are Providers Satisfied With Their EHR? | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Physicians are expected to document encounters with patients. This ensures there is a record of crucial information for decision-making and dispute. A decade ago, around 90% of physicians updated their patient records by hand. By the end of 2014, 83% of physicians had adopted EHR systems. The combination of government incentives, advances in technology, and improved outcomes and operations fueled this growth.

When healthcare providers have access to complete and accurate information, patients receive better care and have better outcomes. Electronic Health Records (EHRs) improve providers’ ability to diagnose disease and reduce medical errors. EHRs further help providers meet patient demands, provide decision support, improve communication, and aid in regulatory reporting.

A national survey of providers highlights their perspective on the benefits of having EHR in their practice:

  • 94% of providers report that their EHR makes records readily available at point of care.
  • 88% of providers report that their EHR produces clinical benefits for the practice.
  • 75% of providers report that their EHR allows them to deliver better patient care.

As the adoption of EHR grew over the last 10 years, so too did the need to change EHR systems within health systems, hospitals, and private medical practices. Growth in M&A activity fueled many healthcare organizations to combine data through EHR data conversion. Provider dissatisfaction has played a key role in encouraging change in EHR systems, also increasing EHR data conversion activity.

A study completed by Health Affairs showed, by and large, providers recognize the important advances that EHRs enable. Fewer than 20% of all providers said they would return to paper records. That being said, providers also noted negative effects of current EHRs on their professional lives and on patient care.  While excited about the possibilities provided by EHRs, providers have ultimately found poor usability that does not match clinical workflows, time-consuming data entry, interference with patient interaction, and too many electronic messages and alerts.

According to a 2014 survey of physicians conducted by AmericanEHR Partners:

  • 54% indicated their EHR system increased their total operating costs.
  • 55% said is was difficult or very difficult to use their EHR to improve efficiency.
  • 72% said it was difficult or very difficult to use their EHR to decrease workload.
  • 43% said they had not yet overcome productivity challenges associated with their EHR implementation.

These concerns about EHR usability are in alignment with others, including the American Medical Informatics Association, researchers, and practicing physicians. Given the rate at which many healthcare organizations have adopted EHRs, these organizations find themselves unable to wait for the long-run fixes. Healthcare organizations are now looking to change EHR providers in order to fix many of the providers’ concerns.

As healthcare organizations begin the process of changing EHR providers, there is an increased need for solutions to provide access to and maintain the integrity of data stored in the legacy systems. When this need arises, healthcare organizations have the choice to archive the legacy data, run multiple systems simultaneously, or complete an EHR data conversion.

Given the complexity of the data and variety of potential solutions, one might suppose that handling legacy data would be a complex affair. In many ways, that is true. However, it doesn’t have to be. To learn more about the state of EHRs and potential solutions for maintaining access and integrity of legacy data.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...