EHR and Health IT Consulting
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EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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Why Are Some EHR Systems Confusing and Inefficient?

Why Are Some EHR Systems Confusing and Inefficient? | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

In theory, EHR systems can alleviate informational errors, increase efficiency and allow doctors to spend more time with patients. The reality, however, is that many EHR solutions can talk the talk, but they can hardly walk the walk.

 

Why is this?

Some EHR companies in the marketplace have produced software without doing their due diligence to completely understand what a doctor’s real day looks and feels like -- they’ve produced generic platforms that don’t address doctors’ real concerns.


Any EHR System Must:

  • Be Scalable
  • Integrate Seamlessly with Other Software
  • Have a Simple User Experience
  • Priced Fairly for the Practice

The third bullet, ‘Have a Simple User Experience,’ is the benefit we’re going to be discussing today because it’s often taken for granted. 

A Simple User Experience

Inputting data into a computer is easy, but the problem arises when EHR solutions can’t correctly identify a doctor’s workflow. Doctors have hundreds of patients, and since no two are alike, thousands of records of unique data are created. This data demands distinct form fields to capture a patient’s specific information. EHR systems must be prepared to capture, organize and file this data away so that a doctor can easily recall it when needed. And when it is recalled, this information must be easily understood by the doctor who may have forgotten exactly how he inputted it.

The solution is intuitive form fields and workflows.

EHR systems should allow for any doctor or office manager to easily understand where to input the right data into the right field. This may sound simple, but most EHR systems just do not comprehend the gravity of proper user experience.

When form fields are misunderstood and unobvious, data finds itself into the wrong reports. In the healthcare industry, this is alarming. Not only does this open up practices and doctors to lawsuits, but before you know it, the EHR system that was supposed to save your practice time and money is now doing the exact opposite.

The Power of Practice EHR
Next-generation, cloud-based software can and will improve a doctor’s day, but not every EHR system is created equal. The Practice EHR team was frustrated by the poor quality of the very EHR systems that were supposed to be improving doctors’ day-to-day lives. So we went and built a better one.

Practice EHR is a solution built by doctors for doctors. It’s specialty-specific, meaning it comes out of the box purpose-built for your specialty practice. It’s also the perfect system for smaller practices of about 1-3 doctors and it was made to alleviate time and hassle in doctors’ busy schedules.

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EHR Features for the Modern Medical Practice

EHR Features for the Modern Medical Practice | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Keeping up with the changing healthcare landscape can be a challenge for many healthcare providers. There’s been a lot to tackle in 2017, from regulatory changes to new physician reimbursement systems, and changes like these can make it difficult for independent medical practices to stay afloat. Aside from MACRA, one of the biggest challenges we hear from our customers is the increasingly competitive nature of healthcare.

 

With increasing patient expectations and demands causing a consumer-driven healthcare environment, it’s time for medical practices to start considering how they can adapt to stay competitive. Our tip: strive to be the modern medical practice— one you and your patients will love. And leverage your EHR to help in this transition. A good EHR should provide great features to help medical practices stay ahead of the curve and be more successful.

 

What functionality and features should forward-thinking medical practices look for in an EHR? We’ve narrowed it down to three simple categories:

 

  • Features that support patient interactions and engagement. 

Does the EHR have a patient kiosk that will create a more enjoyable check-in experience? Is there a patient portal that allows patients to conveniently schedule appointments, make payments, access their records, download educational resources and securely message the physician? Features similar to those that improve the overall patient experience are necessary in today’s world. They not only help a practice stand out from the competition but also add conveniences for the patient and the entire care team.

 

  • Features that help keep you mobile. 

Medical practices who want greater flexibility should consider a cloud-based EHR. With modern features, like cloud accessibility and applications, physicians can securely access their EHR whenever and from wherever they want, using the device they are most comfortable with (i.e. desktop or iPad). Imagine conducting a patient visit virtually, or getting to choose between documenting using free text and clicks or a voice recognition program. Features like Televisit and voice recognition make these convenient scenarios possible.

 

  • Features that improve practice productivity and efficiency. 

Healthcare is an ever-changing environment and with so much to manage there’s even more reason for medical practices to make sure they run optimally. Your EHR should support that goal. A modern dashboard and a good document management setup that is easy to navigate, allows physicians to find what they need, when they need it, and also improves the amount of time it takes to facilitate care. In addition, medical practices can highly benefit from integrated features like e-prescribing, billing, and reporting. These features support better practice operations all around, such as more timely and accurate reimbursements, improved efficiency, staff communication, and patient experiences.

 

But Not All EHR Systems Are Created Equal

Some EHR solutions don’t offer these modern features and benefits. Practice EHR comes standard with these features.

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Physicians, Nurses Reviews on EHRs Improving Care Quality

Physicians, Nurses Reviews on EHRs Improving Care Quality | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Slightly more physicians said that electronic health record (EHR) systems have decreased quality of care (44 percent) in their primary workplace than increased it (40 percent), according to a recent poll from Medscape.

 

The survey included 273 respondents—207 physicians and 66 nurses/APRN (advanced practice registered nurses)—and did find that nurses and APRNs, unlike their physician colleagues, saw more benefit than detriment in EHRs. Forty-two percent said they had increased quality of care versus 35 percent who said they had decreased care quality.

 

When asked what aspects of EHRs increased quality of care, the top answer among physicians was the ability to locate and review patient information more easily (59 percent), followed by the ability to electronically subscribe (49 percent), and portability/access to patient records by all members of the care team (44 percent). The same three aspects were ranked by nurses/APRNs as the top reasons EHRs have increased care quality, just in different order.

 

And when physicians and nurses/APRNs were asked what aspects of EHRs decrease quality of care, they gave similar weight to these four reasons: added paperwork/charting; entering data during the patient encounter; lack of interoperability with other systems; and system failures or problems.

 

When asked how they would like to improve these systems, physicians' top answer was to make the systems more intuitive/user-friendly (44 percent), followed by allowing greater interoperability and record sharing (30 percent). Nurses/APRNs said they would most like to see more interoperability and better record sharing (33 percent), followed by making the systems more user-friendly (30 percent).

 

The poll also revealed that few physicians or nurses were involved in the decision of which EHR to use in their primary workplace. Among physicians, 66 percent had no input, 28 percent had input, and 7 percent did not use an EHR system. Far fewer nurses were part of the decision making: 80 percent had no input, 18 percent had input, and 2 percent did not use an EHR.

 

There has been no shortage of studies over the years that have measured physician satisfaction with EHRs and how they impact the quality of care. Most have generated mixed results. For instance, Stanford Medicine’s 2018 National Physician Poll found that about two-thirds of the more than 500 primary care physicians surveyed think EHRs have generally led to improved care (63 percent) and are at least somewhat satisfied with their current EHR systems (66 percent). These same survey respondents did also continue to report problems with these systems, however, and many (59 percent) said that EHRs need a “complete overhaul.”

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5 Ideas for Reducing Patient No Shows

5 Ideas for Reducing Patient No Shows | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

When patients cancel their appointments at the last minute or don’t show up at all, it leads to lost revenue and a strain on your staff. Patient no shows are costly, and understandably frustrating for medical practices. However, there are a few steps practices can take to help minimize patient no shows. 

 

Read five tips designed to help your practice reduce patient no shows:

  1. Establish a policy. Rule number one when it comes to patient scheduling: have a policy in place. This sounds like an obvious solution, but some practices do not take this important first step until after no shows become a problem. Patients are less likely to skip out on an appointment when they know you have a no-show policy. A small fee can help motivate patients to stick to their appointments.

  2. Offer online scheduling. Offering patients the option to schedule online has become increasingly important for practices. Not only does online scheduling help automate scheduling processes, but your patients are also more likely to keep their appointments. With online scheduling, patients have more control over selecting an appointment time that fits their schedule. A person may also be more likely to reschedule their appointment in advance, instead of canceling last minute.

  3. Send patient reminders. Keep in mind, some patients don’t show up for an appointment simply because they forgot they had one. As a result, practices should have strategies in place to help remind patients about their appointments. In fact, phone call, email and text reminders have shown to reduce no-shows according to a study by MGMA. Consider how your EHR can support you with this effort as well. With the help of technology and the right EHR, practices should be able to automate appointment reminders without adding a ton of work.

  4. Try telemedicine. Offering options for care delivery that fit the patient’s lifestyle is important for medical practices. Today, many patients don’t want to sit in a waiting room for a long period of time. Traffic, work and long wait times are all reasons patients cancel an appointment. By incorporating Telemedicine in your practice, you can offer patients a more convenient alternative for care and help them stay committed to their appointment slot.

  5. Don’t make patients wait. It’s important for your practice to make sure your front desk processes are running efficiently so that you can see patients on time. One bad experience can play a role in whether or not you see a patient again. If patients routinely have to wait long past their scheduled appointment time, they are more likely to cancel on short notice or miss an appointment without any advance notification. Work with your front desk and make sure the right technology is in place to help you reduce patient wait times.

 

No-shows are inevitably going to happen but with the right processes in place they can be managed to have less of an impact. Consider your current scheduling processes and how they can be improved. Consider if it’s time to upgrade to a more automated process with the help of EHR technology. There are solutions out there that can help with your scheduling processes and actually minimize the front-desk workload.

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VA's EHR project is 'yellow trending towards red,' says report obtained by ProPublica

VA's EHR project is 'yellow trending towards red,' says report obtained by ProPublica | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

The Department of Veterans Affairs' EHR contract with Cerner has been plagued by multiple roadblocks during the past year, including personnel issues and changing expectations, according to a ProPublica investigation.

 

Former VA Secretary David Shulkin, MD, released the agency's plan to scrap its homegrown EHR VistA for a Cerner system during a news briefing in June 2017. Almost one year later, the VA finalized a $10 billion no-bid contract with Cerner to implement its EHR systemwide over a 10-year period, beginning with a set of test sites in March 2020.

 

However, a recent progress report by Cerner rated its EHR project with the VA at alert level "yellow trending towards red," according to ProPublica. To investigate the underlying factors that have contributed to the EHR project's problems, the publication reviewed internal documents and conducted interviews with current and former VA officials, congressional staff and outside experts.

 

Here are five details from ProPublica's investigation:

1. When Dr. Shulkin initially announced his plan to implement Cerner at the VA, he emphasized the EHR would provide "seamless care" to veterans, since the Department of Defense had also recently signed a contract with Cerner. However, in September 2017, the VA convened a panel of industry experts who objected to this claim, noting two health systems using Cerner doesn't mean they will be able to share all data with one another.

 

2. At another meeting, Cerner representatives gave a presentation on how their software would be able to share data with private providers, three people present told ProPublica. However, Dr. Shulkin noticed the representatives were only talking about prescription data, rather than the full record of health data, lab reports and medical images that the VA would need. Dr. Shulkin reportedly cut the meeting short and told Cerner to come back with a better solution.

 

3. Cerner's off-the-shelf product didn't match the VA's EHR needs, according to ProPublica. While Cerner's software successfully helps private hospitals bill insurers, the VA doesn't need these same functionalities, since the agency serves as the sole payer for its patient population. Cerner's product also didn't have features for some of the VA's core specialties, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, since these conditions aren't as common in the general population.

 

4. Dr. Shulkin, who left the VA in March, reportedly wanted to find a CIO with a background in healthcare and experience leading major software transitions to helm the EHR project. The VA enlisted two search firms, which identified several qualified candidates, according to sources who spoke with ProPublica. However, the Presidential Personnel Office rejected them, and the White House instead proposed candidates who had worked on the Trump campaign but didn't have a background in health IT.

 

5. At a recent subcommittee hearing, some lawmakers questioned the VA's work on the Cerner project and asked whether the DOD should head up its implementation. Instead, the VA and DOD secretaries opted to sign a joint statement Sept. 26 pledging to align their EHR strategies. However, industry experts warned ProPublica that the agencies have different medical priorities, as the DOD treats young people with acute injuries while the VA provides long-term care to those with complex illnesses.

 

VA spokesman Curt Cashour declined to answer specific questions from ProPublica, saying that "efforts thus far have been successful and we are confident they will continue to be successful." The White House didn't provide answers to a list of questions ProPublica sent, and Cerner also declined to comment.

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Smaller Practices are Choosing Cloud-Based EHR 

Smaller Practices are Choosing Cloud-Based EHR  | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

The medical field has spawned all kinds of new technology that takes patient care to the next level. Regulations demand that even smaller practices need to make the jump to electronic medical record systems (also known as electronic health records). These EMR/EHR solutions provide an interface that gives providers and patients a way to keep themselves connected to each other--a tool to promote a more efficient delivery method for these services. We’ll take a look at these EMR and EHR solutions that are hosted in the cloud, giving your organization more information to make an educated choice on implementing this software.

 

EMR/EHR


EMR/EHR is a critical piece of software for any modern healthcare provider. EMR/EHR is an interface that gives physicians, healthcare providers, and insurers access to updated information about their patients, all at a glance. Since the patient has access to their own file, it can help to promote transparency and collaboration between healthcare providers and patients to improve the quality of their care.

 

Major Considerations


Healthcare is expensive for both patients and providers, which should prompt them to consider a cloud-hosted solution as a viable strategy to minimize costs associated with this industry. Unfortunately, many providers are somewhat reluctant to implement cloud-hosted solutions, even in the face of regulatory compliance laws. There are many serious questions that need to be considered by any organization hoping to take advantage of electronic records--particularly those who store electronic protected health information (ePHI). One of the many considerations any practice needs to consider is the incredible incentive offered to businesses that implement “meaningful use” EMR/EHR technology. To qualify as “meaningful use,” the following variables need to be met:

 

  • Engaging patients in their own care
  • Improving quality, efficiency, safety, and reducing health disparities
  • Improving care coordination
  • Improving public health and health education
  • Meet HIPAA regulations for the privacy of health records


Some of these might seem like common sense, but the costs associated with meeting all of these requirements might be used as an excuse to not invest in these qualifications. Cost is one of the most important factors to consider, and in a high-risk market like healthcare, industry providers generally don’t want to spend more than they have to. The end result is that an organization might utilize cloud-based technology to cut their costs, but there is no guarantee that they will be able to sustain “meaningful use” as it’s defined above.

 

With that said, cloud computing has really come into its own over the past few years, providing even more great services (including security) than ever before--services that EMR/EHR can really benefit from. If you want to implement a solution that can help your medical practice reduce costs and improve functionality, or if you just want to meet the changes in industry regulations, look no further. SouthBridge Consulting can help your business implement high-quality technology solutions designed to increase profits and efficiency. To learn more, reach out to us at (281) 816-6430.

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EHR and Challenges of the Modern Medical Note

EHR and Challenges of the Modern Medical Note | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

There was a time when documentation was an almost inconsequential process. After seeing a patient, the doctor would scratch a note, close the folder, and file it on a shelf until the next visit.

 

Things are different and the medical note has evolved. As it’s evolved, electronic health records (EHR) have brought efficiencies to the medical note while introducing new challenges. And like the cognitive biases that impact patient care, the problems inherent in documentation need attention.

 

Thinking about these challenges becomes important in documenting care and training the next generation of health professionals. Here are a few that I think about

Auto Documentation

One of the powers of the EHR is that it allows users to auto-populate the medical record with chunks of pre-fabricated text known as smart phrases. But these personally created building blocks of the medical note create the potential for one-clip-fits-all documentation. As I’ve said in the past, the smart phrase is not new technology.

 

I work to keep smart phrases out of my history of present illness and impression where individualized narratives show what’s unique about a case. Free text keeps me real.

Replicability

While smart phrases represent the dropping of self-created language, we have the ability to clip and paste information from other parts of the chart. This may include bits and pieces from notes penned by another medical professional.

 

While we all lift bits of language from places like CT and biopsy reports, issues arise when the origination of our language is that of another health professional. Epic now allows visualization of a phrase’s origin when not created by the author.

 

I’m careful about what I copy. I’m twice as careful with what I paste as a representation of my own thinking.

Size and absence of constraint

While smart phrases are limited only by our imagination, a digital note with no constraints predisposes to note bloat, one of the looming threats to modern medicine. Pre-digital notes were constrained by writer’s cramp.

 

I’ve laboured through notes where every single lab drawn on a complicated patient is dumped into the note. Pages and pages of marginally abnormal CBC and metabolic panels create a scenario where it’s difficult, if not impossible, to discern what data is relevant to the decisions made.

 

I try to consider the needs of the end user of the note. Of course, this is challenging when our opinion of what constitutes a ‘good note’ varies from that of the note read.

Ambiguity of purpose

This is the most remarkable phenomenon of the modern medical note. Medical notes have traditionally had pet purposes. Medical students learn early on that ‘the right way to write a note’ varies not only by speciality but by the whim of the individual physician responsible for the note. Physicians with firm views regarding what constitutes the purpose of a note may even morph their perspective depending upon the nature of an individual case.

So if you ask 3 physicians the purpose of a medical note and you’ll get 5 answers ranging from billing and quality documentation to legal coverage and professional communication. Over time the medical note has morphed into all of these things at once.

 

The problem with an ambiguity of purpose is how to manage the expectations of the end user. A physician who feels compelled to paste three months worth of blood results into the data portion of a note will be at odds with someone like myself who believes that a note serves to offer nothing other than concise support for what I’m thinking and planning.

 

As notes become more visible to more folks we can expect ambiguity of purpose to become more pronounced. Digital notes and their capacity for customization amplify this divergence of purpose.

Scaling visibility of the EHR

Once restricted to the shelves of offices in big buildings, medical documentation has traditionally been siloed. This was fine because notes existed for the doctors who occupied those individual offices.  The medical note is now enjoying new freedom in its electronic shape. More notes are more visible to more professionals. This is evident within consolidated health systems where networks of offices connect to big hospitals.

 

Beyond professionals, patients are watching and, in some cases, editing their own notes. OpenNotes is a related program based in Boston’s Beth Israel hospital. Regular patient review and revision represent a revolutionary move in medical documentation.

This scaling visibility of the modern note brings greater scrutiny for what we do or don’t do.

 

This idea of the medical note and its evolution gets little attention yet it represents the core medium of all documentation by medical professionals. It deserves more thorough attention and study.

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20 Questions to Ask an EHR Vendor Before Making the Switch

20 Questions to Ask an EHR Vendor Before Making the Switch | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Choosing the right electronic health record (EHR) for your medical practice is a big decision. There are so many software's on the market today and it can be difficult for medical practices to find one that’s the best fit for their practice.

 

In order to make the best decision, it’s important to ask the right questions and have an honest conversation with the vendor about their software. Where do you start? The following is a list of 20 questions medical practices should ask before making the switch. This list is a compilation of the most commonly asked questions we hear from our prospective customers.

 

Ask the following questions and add a few of your own based on the needs of your practice. Asking the right questions and digging deep will help you find not only an EHR vendor but a partner who’s also committed to helping your practice be successful.

Learn about the company.

1. How many other practices use your software that our similar to my practice size and specialty?

2. Aside from EHR/PM, what other products and services can you offer my practice?

3. How do you keep my data secure?

4. Who owns the data in the system?

5. What sets you apart from other vendors?

 

Get to know the software.

6. Do you have an integrated practice management system? 

7. What clearinghouse do you use?

8. What types of devices can I use with your software?

9. Is your software cloud-based?

10. Is your system easy to use?

11. Is your software ONC 2015 Edition certified?

12. What reports are available in your EHR?

13. How will this software help improve patient flow and operations in my practice?

14. Are there any extra costs related to the software?

 

Ask questions about training, implementation, and support.

15. How long is the implementation process?

16. How is my data migrated into the EHR?

17. How does training work?

18. How responsive are your product development team and customer support team?

19. What are your support hours?

20. Are there costs related to set up, training, implementation or support?

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Which Multiregional EHR Vendors Fared Well Globally in 2018?

Which Multiregional EHR Vendors Fared Well Globally in 2018? | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Among multiregional electronic health record (EHR) vendors, Epic and Cerner contracts accounted for the most new hospital beds in 2018, according to a new report from KLAS Research.

 

Last year, more than 180 healthcare organizations outside the U.S. made EHR purchase decisions—impacting 377 hospitals, according to the Utah-based KLAS, which released the report on May 9, a week after it released it’s U.S. hospital EHR market share report. Last week’s U.S.-based findings revealed that for the second year in a row, Cerner signed the highest number of new hospitals, but large private sector hospitals are almost exclusively choosing Epic technology.

 

The global EHR market share report for 2019 similarly discloses that Epic and Cerner are leading the way in terms of volume of beds contracted in 2018. Epic’s 2018 contracts were some of the largest in scope, accounting for more new beds than any other vendor. The majority of these beds came from a regional decision in Singapore in which Epic was chosen as the go-forward vendor in two of the country’s three integrated healthcare clusters, KLAS reported. In total, Epic signed four new contracts (across three regions), which was one of their lowest totals in recent years.

 

Cerner, meanwhile, was selected as the go-forward EHR platform by two counties in Sweden that will be migrating to Millennium from a legacy Siemens solution. These decisions represent two of the largest contracts signed in 2018, both in size and technology scope (they include population health management) and are Cerner’s first Millennium deployments in the Nordics. The Millennium platform was not purchased outside of Europe in 2018.

 

Other multiregional vendors such as Agfa HealthCare, Dedalus, and InterSystems were each selected in eight or more decisions, according to the KLAS findings.

 

Agfa HealthCare was selected in 10 separate decisions (more than any other multiregional vendor). The “wins” occurred in two regions and include a number of net new large multihospital decisions. Dedalus had the most hospital wins of any multiregional vendor; these wins came mostly through GHTs (territorial hospital groups) in France; additional wins came from other decisions in France, Italy, and Kuwait. InterSystems was third in terms of new contracts, with eight, and saw the most geographic diversity, signing contracts in Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and Oceania

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Practice EHR to Attend Midwest Podiatry Conference

Practice EHR to Attend Midwest Podiatry Conference | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Calling all Midwest podiatrists! Are you looking for an opportunity to collect your continued education credits and collaborate with fellow podiatrists, while having some fun? Well then, we hope to see you at the Midwest Podiatry Conference (MPC) at the Hyatt Regency Chicago on April 19-22.

We are very excited to support the podiatry profession at MPC18, and have some fun activities planned that we hope you'll join us for. Mark your calendars!

  • Stop by our booth - First and for most, we'd like to invite you to come by our booth (Booth #1019) to learn more about Practice EHR and what we do. Meet our team and experience our EHR and practice management solution that's designed for podiatry. 
  • Attend our presentation - Our very own, Natasha Patel, Clinical Sales Director will be leading a fun and informative session on the EHR features you can use to better streamline your practice. She'll also give you an inside look at Practice EHR and how those features work in our software. Details: Saturday, April 21 at noon in the exhibit hall theatre.
  • Hear from one of our clients - This year we're very excited to have one of our clients with us at MPC, who will be leading a presentation session. Dr. Barbara Aung will discuss running a practice from a business state of mind. She'll dive into the numbers of your practice, the cost of treating a patient and how your EHR can help you keep track of your financials. Details: Friday, April 20 at 5pm in Grand AB.

 

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5 Essential Benefits of Using Artificial Intelligence (AI) Technology in EHR's

5 Essential Benefits of Using Artificial Intelligence (AI) Technology in EHR's | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Machine learning is a promising domain that has positively impacted many industries and now healthcare is witnessing its powerful emergence. The progress of Artificial Intelligence-based technology, along with other advances in EHRs is bringing a new wave of interest in how this latest technology is going to change the shape of health and healthcare. EHR platforms are at the forefront of using artificial intelligence within the healthcare arena. This is because of the widespread use of EHR software and the capability of EHR software to categorically store real-time patient data. These data sets can be used by artificial intelligence to make predictions and suggestions for the future.

 

This fast-growing digitalization has created major opportunities for the use of artificial intelligence. Industry experts and innovators see the potential and continue to gradually improve AI-based features within updated EHR systems. The widespread use of this digital health data advances health outcomes and there is no doubt it will eventually reshape the healthcare industry. Let’s have a look at some more unique benefits.

Benefits of Using AI Technology in EHR Software

  1. Better Diagnosis & Treatment

Newly developed AI diagnostic systems can help providers diagnose and treat different diseases. This advanced system uses the historical data and patient symptoms to predict future illness. EHRs are more intelligent now and can suggest the high paying CPT codes for the identified disease so providers can maximize their earning potential as well. In the future, this AI-based diagnostics system could possibly even lead to self-diagnosis tools and treatment facilities for common diseases.

  1. Reduces Human Error

talkEHR is a good example of a self-learning electronic health record system that comes with an integrated medical voice assistant named “Allison”. This intelligent voice assistant lets you talk with your EHR, and performs the requested functions you tell her to. This saves charting time and reduces human errors. Also, the longer you use the system, the more this self-learning software is able to provide you with an improved, personalized experience.

  1. Cost-Efficient

Artificial intelligence based EHR software automate the normal workflow of medical practices and, to some extent, eliminate the need for additional support staff. Auto reminder calls, appointment scheduling, and other task automations are improving the workflow of medical practices, as well as reducing overhead expenses.

  1. Better Medical Imaging Analysis

Artificial intelligence-assisted medical imaging analysis is much better than a manual one. It analyzes and compares the cell structures and also tissue segmentation to identify disease and suggest treatment.    

  1. Improves Productivity

AI-based EHRs improve the productivity of medical practices as they significantly reduce the administrative complexity, clinical waste, malpractice likelihood, and help to save the staff time they would otherwise spend on repetitive tasks.

Healthcare facilities are making necessary investments in AI-based EHR development, and over time, the AI algorithms will continue to improve and fully transform the healthcare industry. How closely will this transformation resemble the vision of medical futurists? We look forward to seeing how it takes shape. Feel free to share your thoughts in the comment box below!

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Kareo Integrates EHR with GoodRx to Reduce Prescription Drug Costs

Kareo Integrates EHR with GoodRx to Reduce Prescription Drug Costs | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Kareo, a cloud-based EHR provider for independent medical practices has launched Kareo Rx Saver, an integrated solution with GoodRx that seamlessly delivers prescription cost savings to patients of physicians.

 

Prescription drug prices often vary significantly across pharmacies, making it difficult for a patient to select the least costly option. To address this problem, Kareo has integrated its clinical EHR with with prescription and drug savings provider GoodRx to present real-time cost comparisons between local pharmacies during e-prescribing while also delivering money-saving coupons. With KaroRx Saver, independent physicians can directly and instantly help lower the cost of care for their patients when prescribing medication.

 

Kareo, a cloud-based EHR provider for independent medical practices has launched Kareo Rx Saver, an integrated solution with GoodRx that seamlessly delivers prescription cost savings to patients of physicians.

 

Prescription drug prices often vary significantly across pharmacies, making it difficult for a patient to select the least costly option. To address this problem, Kareo has integrated its clinical EHR with with prescription and drug savings provider GoodRx to present real-time cost comparisons between local pharmacies during e-prescribing while also delivering money-saving coupons. With KaroRx Saver, independent physicians can directly and instantly help lower the cost of care for their patients when prescribing medication.

 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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Are Medical Practices Taking Advantage of Cloud-Based EHR?  

Are Medical Practices Taking Advantage of Cloud-Based EHR?   | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

In today’s medical field, technology is a big player. With regulations dictating that even independent practices attempt to make the jump to a dedicated EMR/EHR. An EMR/EHR, or electronic medical record/electronic health record interface, provides physicians and patients a way to connect to promote efficient healthcare delivery and organizational profitability. Today, we will look at how smaller healthcare providers are utilizing EMR/EHR solutions that are hosted in the cloud, bucking the trend of hosting their patient information locally.

 

EMR/EHR


For the modern healthcare provider, the EMR/EHR is a major piece of software. The EMR/EHR is an interface that physicians, healthcare providers, and insurers use to update the information on each patient. As the patient has access to their own EMR/EHR file as well, it makes it a very useful guide for all parties involved to manage an individual patient’s care.

 

Major Considerations
With the massive cost of health care, it isn’t much of a stretch to say that there are some very serious considerations that have to be made to the way that doctors and health organizations utilize cloud-hosted technologies. Many providers, however, are reluctant to do just that as there are serious questions about the viability of cloud computing for regulation-covered information such as electronic protected health information (ePHI). One such consideration is the massive incentives offered to organizations who implement “meaningful use” EMR/EHR technology. In order to meet the “meaningful use” criteria, however, many separate variables have to be met, including:

  • Engaging patients in their own care
  • Improving quality, efficiency, safety, and reducing health disparities
  • Improving care coordination
  • Improving public health and health education
  • Meet HIPAA regulations for the privacy of health records

 

So while many of these variables seem to be common sense, there are additional costs that go along with this kind of comprehensive use of EMR/EHR functionality, which, for smaller medical practices, can be enough of an impetus to not meet those qualifications. Cost usually supersedes most other qualifications, even in a high-stakes, results-based business model like healthcare. That means that even though utilizing cloud technology will cut costs, there is no guarantee that a practice will meet the necessary criteria for “meaningful use”.

 

That said, cloud computing has more resources available to maintain data security than ever before, and organizations can still move to an EMR/EHR solution that will benefit their users, and their staff. If you are looking for a solution to help your medical practice cut costs, get dynamic web-based functionality, or get your technology in a position to meet industry regulations, contact the experts

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Essential Questions for Picking EHR Patient Portal Software 

Essential Questions for Picking EHR Patient Portal Software  | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

It’s time to revisit the much undervalued, if much maligned, patient portal. To date, patient portals remain an underutilized resource. But a convergence of trends may change your thinking about their value — especially when selecting or upgrading EHR software. To help with that process, we offer a 10-point checklist for evaluating a patient portal’s usability and functionality. 

Patient Portals: A Mixed Bag

Most of us have used a patient portal, and the reviews are mixed at best. A product of meaningful use requirements, they were mandated as a way to provide patients with timely access to their healthcare.

At their most basic, they’re used to retrieve lab results, ask a question or update patient profiles and insurance providers. Some allow patients to schedule appointments and pay bills. For providers, they represent an opportunity to increase patient engagement, promote loyalty, manage costs and streamline workflows.

In reality, their potential has yet to be harnessed. Hard to access, patient portals are often badly designed, cumbersome to navigate and limited in utility. It’s sometimes easier for patients to pick up the phone and call their provider than to look up their user name or create a new password. For staff and physicians, they require time and resources that aren’t usually billable.

Emerging Trends Impacting Patient Portal Usage and Importance

So beyond next-stage meaningful use requirements, why should the patient portal receive greater consideration in the EHR selection process?

Value-Based Care

First and foremost, as healthcare moves from fee-for-service to value-based care, providers will have further incentive to improve the patient experience, track compliance and manage costs.

In a medical research paper — Patient portals and health apps: Pitfalls, promises, and what one might learn from the other — issued last year, the authors asserted that “the push for reimbursement that relates to value-based care creates an opportunity to develop high-quality patient portals.”

In addition to improving patient health and facilitating wellness, patient portals have the potential to free up staff time, lower call volume (including call backs and phone tag), increase accuracy, reduce duplication and cut down on time spent on patient records, payments and prescription refills.

Data

The future of health and medicine points to the primacy of data. Patient portals can yield a trove of information not captured in a doctor’s visit or clinical interaction — resulting in better population health management and a better ability to track patient engagement and improve adherence to treatment plans.

Patient as Consumer

Patient portals will grow in popularity as patients evolve into healthcare consumers. Increasingly, they want better, faster access to their health information, and to be involved in the medical decision-making process. Patient portals are a natural extension of the trend to go online to select a provider or research medical conditions and treatments. They’re going to expect a positive user experience, rewarding those who do with their loyalty.

Mobile Apps/mHealth

The growing use of mobile apps, smartphones and wearable devices to monitor and upload information about their health and physical activity facilitates more patient self-management and data exchange with their patient portal.

10 Point EHR Checklist for Evaluating Patient Portal Usability

Given the patient portal’s potential and growing importance, how should you evaluate the best portal for your practice or facility?

As a healthcare provider, you can select a standalone patient portal that oftentimes is hosted by a third-party vendor. This approach can result in compatibility issues with your EHR system, requiring your EHR vendor’s cooperation — often at a price.

Alternatively, you can select a patient portal as part of an EHR bundle of services. The good news is that most EHR systems provide a patient portal component. When evaluating their product, you need to remember that patient portals are not all created equal, and can vary in functionality and usability. As such, you need to take into consideration:

  1. Cost – What is the cost to design and activate the portal? Do they provide training, maintenance, troubleshooting and upgrades?
  2. Customization – Do you have flexibility to customize the interface to take into account your practice, specialty and patient profile?  Is it white-labeled to allow for branding?  Do providers have the ability to make refinements?
  3. Patient Management – Does it provide the ability to refill prescriptions, monitor compliance, track patient progress, schedule/cancel appointments, pay bills, upload documents and download practice forms? If they don’t provide all these services, which ones are most important to you?
  4. Communication – How easy is it for patients to send and receive emails and messages? Can patients upload documents? And does it easily and securely integrate with mobile health apps, in a format that providers can use?
  5. Patient Access – How complicated is it for patients to set up an account?  Is it a multi-step process?  Does it incorporate “responsive design” so that it’s accessible and easily readable on a computer screen, mobile device and a smartphone?  
  6. Usability and Navigation – Is the user experience intuitive, consumer-friendly and easy to navigate? Does the portal present information such as test results in a way that patients can understand and interpret? Can it account for sight-impaired patients and patients who don’t speak English?
  7. Content – Can patients view laboratory results and track immunizations, medications and allergies? Can they access personal health data, notes from physicians and medical histories?  Can they renew medications; update their information (insurance, address changes, etc); view discharge and medication instructions; and access an online healthcare library of educational resources?
  8. Security – Is the site HIPAA-compliant to ensure privacy? How secure is the connection in protecting stored data and guarding against data breaches? Does it meet confidentiality and legal requirements for minors? What is the process for setting and resetting passwords?
  9. Workflow automation – Once patient information has been reviewed and approved, can it be uploaded into your EHR (including care plans, clinical visits, insurance coverage, billing) without additional keying or extra work that can result in errors? Can this process be customized to meet your current and future requirements as procedures and policies change? Can it send alerts?
  10. You: The patient portal is evolving, gaining wider acceptance and growing in importance. Not every EHR can address all of these considerations in a manner that meets your needs. Its components are only part of the equation. The other part is you and your commitment.

For starters, do you have a physician champion or super-user who’ll advocate for your patient portal?  Can you ensure that staff are properly trained, and that it’s maintained and regularly upgraded? Are you willing to commit the resources to ensure it’s routinely monitored and being used properly? Do you have the resources to create awareness and educate patients on how to use and maximize its benefits? And do your internal policies and procedures encourage usage?

Ultimately, you can’t guarantee patient compliance or participation. However, you can select a portal that helps you achieve your business goals and meets your patients’ needs.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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