EHR and Health IT Consulting
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Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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How to Choose the Right EHR Vendor for your Practice

How to Choose the Right EHR Vendor for your Practice | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Electronic Health Records (EHR) Software has gained considerable attention from practices worldwide due to its innumerable advantages. EHR’s are built to provide an organized, accurate, and cost-effective documentation process. Using one saves time and reduces paper work drastically, thereby enhancing productivity. But, finding the EHR system that best suits your practice and also installing it correctly are two major challenges that you are likely to face before reaping the real benefits of an EHR. So, before you go further with your EHR planning, let’s first have a look at some important pointers to keep in mind while looking for the best EHR vendor.

 

There are so many EHR vendors waiting for a chance to gain your business. They all offer attractive service packages and discounts to make their product seem the most attractive. But, they can’t all be the best in actuality, so it’s important that you consider some critical questions. These questions will equip you with sufficient information about the vendor and will help you make an informed decision. Below are the primary items we’d recommend you think through before going forward:

Tips for Choosing the Right EHR Vendors for your Practice

  • Compatibility and Reliability

If you are used to evaluating vendors on a regular basis, then you would be aware of the requisites of the vendor selection process. But for those not accustomed to this, the first step is to determine that the EHR system in question is compatible with your company’s infrastructure. For that, a trusted and reliable vendor should be chosen who has a solid history, including an impeccable service record. Customer reviews say a lot about a product or a service and are worth looking into.

  • Meaningful Use (MU) Criteria

There are certain criteria that’ll help you shortlist a vendor. The EHR incentive program has set the meaningful use criteria specifically for the EHR systems, so look to this as a priority. It is a common feature found in EHR systems, but the latest one is the MU3 category.  We would recommend that you make sure your new one has this.

  • Aligned Core Values

You want an EHR system made specifically for the management of healthcare-related information and organized for proper documentation. But, it should also align with the needs and values of your practice (a.k.a. customization options). The vendor should be willing to design a unique service package that suits your core operations, too.

  • Impressive User Experience

Although this is not the number one priority list, it’s still important to keep in mind when picking the right EHR system. A system with a confusing workflow that isn’t intuitive won’t work. Ignoring this would be a mistake. Make sure you and some team members of your practice try it first to confirm whether it’s the right fit from a usability perspective.

 

These are some of the key characteristics to think through. Before stepping into the market, do some homework and shortlist all the potential EHR vendors that seem to carry potential. Then, conduct some research on each one of them to narrow down your list. These steps will save you time while guaranteeing, to a great extent, the trustworthiness of your vendor and effectiveness of your decision.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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Physician viewpoint on How to remove 'stupid stuff' from EHRs 

Physician viewpoint on How to remove 'stupid stuff' from EHRs  | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

It's time to cut unnecessary work from the EHR, according to a perspective in The New England Journal of Medicine by Melinda Ashton, MD, a physician with Hawaii Pacific Health in Honolulu.

 

In the article, Dr. Ashton describes a program she and her colleagues launched in October 2017, called "Getting Rid of Stupid Stuff." In an effort to engage clinicians and reduce burnout, the program team asked all employees at the healthcare network to review their daily documentation practices and nominate aspects of the EHR they thought were "poorly designed, unnecessary or just plain stupid."

 

Along with fielding nominations from physicians and nurses, the team also conducted its own review of documentation practices, and removed 10 of the 12 most frequently ignored alerts the EHR pushed to physicians. The team also removed order sets that had not been used recently.

 

Dr. Ashton acknowledged the specific changes likely aren't relevant for other hospitals, but she advocated for the shift in mentality the "Getting Rid of Stupid Stuff" program initiated. "It appears that there is stupid stuff all around us, and although many of the nominations we receive aren't for big changes, the small wins that come from acknowledging and improving our daily work do matter," she wrote.

 

Here are four of the categories Dr. Ashton and her colleagues deleted from the EHR as part of the program:

 

1. One nurse who worked with adolescent patients asked to remove a physical assessment row labeled "cord," meant to reflect care of the umbilical cord remnant in newborns. The row, which was supposed to be suppressed for those older than 30 days of age, had still been present for other ages.

 

2. A nurse who cared for newborns said she had to click three times whenever she changed a diaper, as a result of EHR documentation for incontinence requiring the clinician to indicate whether the patient is incontinent of urine, stool or both. The team created a single-click option for children in diapers.

 

3. Multiple nurses highlighted the frequency of "head-to-toe" nursing assessments, which they are expected to complete upon assuming care of each patient. However, in some units, the EHR prompted nurses to document several of these assessments during a 12-hour shift.

 

"We sought to identify standards in the literature and found that some of our practices were in keeping with those standards," Dr. Ashton wrote. "In other units, we reduced the frequency of required evaluation and documentation."

 

4. An emergency medicine physician questioned why the EHR prompts employees to print an after-visit summary before scanning it back into the system. He hadn't noticed the patient was expected to sign the summary, which was stored in the record.

 

"His question led us to query other health systems and our legal team about the value of the signature, and we were able to remove this requirement," Dr. Ashton wrote. "The physician was delighted that he had been able to influence a practice that he believed was a waste of support-staff time."

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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