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Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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Free iOS App from ADP AdvancedMD Allows Any Physician Practice to Assess ICD-10 Preparedness

Free iOS App from ADP AdvancedMD Allows Any Physician Practice to Assess ICD-10 Preparedness | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

South Jordan, Utah – February 24, 2015– ADP® AdvancedMD, a leader in all-in-one, cloud electronic health record (EHR), practice management, medical scheduling, medical billing services as well as a pioneer of big data reporting and business intelligence for smaller medical practices, today announced the release and availability of AdvancedMD ICD-10 Toolkit, a free app that gives private practices a suite of ICD-10 preparation tools. Now anyone with an iPhone or iPad running iOS8 can easily test their readiness and train staff for the October 1deadline, free of charge. Customers of AdvancedMD practice management software can also leverage the app to add ICD-10 codes to their charge slip templates.

“ADP AdvancedMD has been a leader in the ICD-10 transition process and a champion of independent physicians and small practices, with such tools as MyICD10.AdvancedMD.com, a website aimed at helping medical practices prepare for the ICD-10 transition, featuring a timeline and a wealth of tools, training and tips to help practices prepare for the change,” said Raul Villar, president, ADP AdvancedMD. “With less than half of all practices ready for the change, we saw a need for a tool that would aid the entire community of independent physicians in their progress.”

The app was created as part of the ADP AdvancedMD iCommit program, which offers incentives to engineers for independently pursuing innovations in addition to their regular jobs.

“We decided that there should be a tool to help everyone prepare for the change to ICD-10 and give our community the ability to gauge their readiness,” said Barlow Tucker, software engineer, ADP AdvancedMD. “A free app was the clear choice because it’s easy to access and use, plus it allows people to get an ICD-10 ‘checkup’ at any time.”

The AdvancedMD ICD-10 Toolkit allows users to:

– Track preparedness for ICD-10
– Compare ICD-9 codes with the ICD-10 equivalents, including risk of increased specificity
– View potential high-risk areas
– Search for ICD-10 codes and sub codes
– View articles and action plans to guide a specific transition

Download the new AdvancedMD ICD-10 Toolkit app for iPad®, iPhone®, and iPod Touch® available for free on the Apple app store.


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Hospital Groups Call for Avoiding Another ICD-10 Delay | EHRintelligence.com

Hospital Groups Call for Avoiding Another ICD-10 Delay | EHRintelligence.com | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it
Hospital groups have written a letter to leaders of Congress asking the latter to avoid another ICD-10 delay.

With less than ten months to go before healthcare organizations and providers need to comply with most recent ICD-10 transition deadline, the standoff between proponents and opponents of the 2015 ICD-10 compliance date is increasing in intensity.

A band of hospital and health system associations have written a letter to leaders of Congress asking the latter to avoid another ICD-10 delay. A total of eight industry groups have undersigned the petition:


“As the organizations representing more than 5,000 hospitals and health systems across the country, we strongly support the announced October 1, 2015 ICD-10 compliance date and oppose any steps to delay,” the organizations write. “Recent ICD-10 implementation delays have been disruptive and costly for hospitals and health systems, as well as to health care delivery innovation, payment reform, public health, and health care payment.”

The letter to Representatives John Boehner (R-OH) and Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Senators Harry Reid (D-NV) and Mitch McConnell (R-KY) specifically recalls the setbacks resulting from the most recent one-year delay of ICD-10 implementation from 2014 to 2015:

The delay added billions of dollars in extra costs. Many of our members had to quickly reconfigure systems and processes that were prepared to use ICD-10 back to ICD-9. Newly trained coders who graduated from ICD-10 focused programs were unprepared for use of the older code set and needed to be retrained back to using ICD-9. Further, training of existing coders needed to be repeated given the one-year delay. This results in a doubling of costs that are not productive. A further delay would only add additional costs as existing investments would be further wasted and future costs would grow.

The advocacy by the hospital and health system associations comes shortly after Medical Society of the State of New York and Texas Medical Association called on their members to persuade Congress to implement two-year ICD-10 delay until 2017. Those provider association have highlighted the negative financial implications for physician practices if an industry-wide ICD-10 implementation failed on Oct. 1, 2015.  The letter’s timing of December 5 also coincides with the message delivered by the Coalition for ICD-10 following remarks by American Medical Association President Robert Wah, MD, that contained arguments against and jokes about new code set.

Based on the types of organizations working in favor and against an additional ICD-10, a division clearly exists between hospitals and hospitals and physician practices. While advocates for the latter reiterate the readiness of their constituents, their counterparts see nothing bad negative consequences ahead for their members. And this division likely to puts to be any lingering doubts about the forces behind the most recent ICD-10 delay.



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Q&A: Preparing for ICD-10, competing HIT initiatives

Q&A: Preparing for ICD-10, competing HIT initiatives | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Because of recent rulings by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) on second phase of the EHR Incentive Programs and the compliance date for ICD-10, 2014 is likely to become a busy year for providers, hospitals, and health systems..

 

In and of themselves, the demonstration of meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs) and the transition to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) are serous undertakings. Because of recent rulings by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) on second phase of the EHR Incentive Programs and the compliance date for ICD-10, 2014 is likely to become a busy year for providers, hospitals, and health systems affected by both programs as they attempt to assign resources to competing priorities and deadlines. It would appear that CMS has set in motion a perfect storm that could cripple healthcare staff and exhaust their resources.

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ICD-10 Acknowledgement Testing Checklist for Providers

ICD-10 Acknowledgement Testing Checklist for Providers | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

While ICD-10 acknowledgment testing is available any day of the year up until October 1, 2015, CMS is taking the first week in March to host another dedicated opportunity for providers.  The testing weeks serve as way to gather data about the way providers send their sample ICD-10 claims to Medicare and allow providers to ensure that their claims can be accepted by the adjudication system without any technical glitches.

Those organizations that have not participated in previous testing weeks are encouraged to join in during the next chance on March 2 through 6, or the final scheduled occasion at the beginning of June.

In order to successfully submit claims for ICD-10 acknowledgement testing, direct-submit healthcare organizations, including providers and clearinghouses, will need to keep the following questions, tips and, requirements in mind.

What is ICD-10 acknowledgement testing?

Acknowledgement testing is the most basic form of assurance that a claim can be accepted by a Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC) for later adjudication.  It should not be confused with end-to-end testing, in which a claim is processed through all Medicare system edits in order to produce electronic remittance advice (ERA).  Acknowledgement testing simply provides a yes or no answer to the question of whether or not the sample claim can be accepted.

Providers are encouraged to use ICD-10 acknowledgement testing as a basic way to ensure that they are on the right track with their ICD-10 preparation.

How do I participate?

Information about acknowledgement testing will be provided on your local MAC website or by your clearinghouse.  Any provider that submits electronic Medicare fee-for-service claims is eligible for participation.  There is no registration required.  For more information on eligibility, click here.

ICD-10 acknowledgement testing does not test initial connectivity to the MAC system, nor does it ensure that your internal systems are capable of producing, accepting, storing, or transmitting codes.  Internal preparations for the generation and transmission of ICD-10 codes should already be completed before MAC testing.

How do I prepare my sample claims for submission?

Ensure that you have enough claims coded in ICD-10 to represent your typical submissions spectrum.  CMS reminds providers that claims must have the “T” in the ISA15 field to indicate the file is a test file.  Use a valid submitter ID, national provider identifier (NPI), and Provider Transaction Access Numbers (PTAN) combinations.  Claims that contain invalid identifiers will be rejected.

Be sure that the claims do not include future dates of service.  All claims must be dated before March 1, 2015 in order to be processed. Claims must also have an ICD-10 companion qualifier code or they will be rejected.

Providers may engage in “negative testing” by submitting purposely erroneous claims in order to confirm that the MACs will catch defects or incorrect information.

What information will I receive from my MAC?

Test claims will be assigned a 277CA or 999 acknowledgement as confirmation that the claim was accepted or rejected by the system.  The test will not confirm that the claim would be paid under ICD-10, nor will testers receive any remittance advice.  The MACs and the Durable Medical Equipment (DME) MAC Common Electronic Data Interchange (CEDI) will have extra staff available to take calls from providers who have questions about the process or their results.

Providers will need to engage in full end-to-end testing with their payers if they wish to receive information about their coding accuracy or payment rates.  While CMS has scheduled end-to-end testing for April 2015, participating providers have already been selected.  Providers are still encouraged to engage in end-to-end testing with their private payers as soon as possible.

What do I do next?

During prior acknowledgement testing, CMS has released basic data on acceptance rates several weeks after the dedicated testing period.  But providers participating in the opportunity do not need to wait until then to take action based on their own results.  With a mere seven months until October 1, 2015, organizations that experienced unexpected denials from acknowledgement testing should work with their ICD-10 preparation teams or consultants to resolve internal or coding errors quickly.

Healthcare organizations should also make sure that they are coordinating with their major payers to conduct additional, more robust testing of ICD-10 claims.  Providers should continue to utilize clinical documentation improvement programs, revenue cycle contingency planning, and coder training and education during the last few months of preparation in order to combat potential negative impacts from the new codes.


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ICD-10 Coalition Fires Back at AMA Remarks on New Codes | EHRintelligence.com

ICD-10 Coalition Fires Back at AMA Remarks on New Codes | EHRintelligence.com | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it
The Coalition for ICD-10 responds to continued resistance from the American Medical Association.
“Injured in a lightsaber duel” may not be among the handful of quirky codes included in the tens of thousands of new ICD-10 identifiers, but the addition might be necessary following American Medical Association (AMA) President Dr. Robert Wah’s recent remarks lampooning some of the stranger options within the code set.  After making a reference to the popular Star Wars franchise during a speech to the AMA House of Delegates, the Coalition for ICD-10 took issue with Wah’s derision of the comprehensive update, and supplied a number of counter arguments.
“If it was a droid, ICD-10 would serve Darth Vader… For more than a decade, the AMA kept ICD-10 at bay – and we want to freeze it in carbonite!  Sucked into a jet engine? Burned by flaming water skis? Yes, there are codes for that,” Wah, a self-professed Star Wars fan who joked about his nickname of “Obi-Wah-Kenobi” as an OB-GYN intern, said in his speech.
But Wah was unable to play any Jedi mind tricks on the Coalition, which was not amused by his attempts at levity.  “Dr. Wah’s attempt at humor is unfortunate because the quality and precision of our national health care data is a serious matter. In this country, we use coded data to assess quality of care, make benefit coverage decisions and to determine physician and hospital payment,” the Coalition’s response states. “The financial viability and performance assessments of hospitals and physicians are impacted by the data. Yet we continue to rely on an outdated 1970s-era coding system for reporting diagnoses and inpatient hospital procedures.”
Noting the importance of seemingly strange codes to areas of medical practice such as worker’s compensation and the Department of Defense, the Coalition adds that these codes don’t pose a burden for physicians who will rarely, if ever, be required to use them.  “This is like saying the English language is a burden to use because there are 470,000 words in Webster’s unabridged English dictionary,” says the statement. “Just as no one is expected to know rarely used words like floccinaucinihilipilification… physicians and other providers will only use the codes relevant to their patient population (e.g., an ophthalmologist will primarily use only the eye codes).”
The Coalition goes on to state that emerging health issues such as Ebola and concussions among youth sports players cannot be coded in ICD-9, and adds that the rest of the world has long since moved on to the more complete, detailed, and advanced code set.  ICD-9 is unable to identify a number of common issues such as complications and potential quality problems, and is not current with new advances in procedures and newly identified diseases.
“How can we as a nation assess hospital outcomes, pay fairly, ensure accurate performance reports, and embrace value-based care if our coded data doesn’t provide such basic information?” the Coalition asks. “Doesn’t the public have a right to know this kind of information?”
ICD-10 may not be the code set the AMA is looking for, but one thing is immediately clear: October 1, 2015 is anything but far, far away.  Providers who wish to be prepared for the implementation of the ICD-10 code set within the next year should continue to move through their transition timelines in an appropriate manner to avoid potentially negative revenue impacts should the update go ahead as planned in 2015.



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