EHR and Health IT Consulting
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EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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Smaller Practices are Choosing Cloud-Based EHR 

Smaller Practices are Choosing Cloud-Based EHR  | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

The medical field has spawned all kinds of new technology that takes patient care to the next level. Regulations demand that even smaller practices need to make the jump to electronic medical record systems (also known as electronic health records). These EMR/EHR solutions provide an interface that gives providers and patients a way to keep themselves connected to each other--a tool to promote a more efficient delivery method for these services. We’ll take a look at these EMR and EHR solutions that are hosted in the cloud, giving your organization more information to make an educated choice on implementing this software.

 

EMR/EHR


EMR/EHR is a critical piece of software for any modern healthcare provider. EMR/EHR is an interface that gives physicians, healthcare providers, and insurers access to updated information about their patients, all at a glance. Since the patient has access to their own file, it can help to promote transparency and collaboration between healthcare providers and patients to improve the quality of their care.

 

Major Considerations


Healthcare is expensive for both patients and providers, which should prompt them to consider a cloud-hosted solution as a viable strategy to minimize costs associated with this industry. Unfortunately, many providers are somewhat reluctant to implement cloud-hosted solutions, even in the face of regulatory compliance laws. There are many serious questions that need to be considered by any organization hoping to take advantage of electronic records--particularly those who store electronic protected health information (ePHI). One of the many considerations any practice needs to consider is the incredible incentive offered to businesses that implement “meaningful use” EMR/EHR technology. To qualify as “meaningful use,” the following variables need to be met:

 

  • Engaging patients in their own care
  • Improving quality, efficiency, safety, and reducing health disparities
  • Improving care coordination
  • Improving public health and health education
  • Meet HIPAA regulations for the privacy of health records


Some of these might seem like common sense, but the costs associated with meeting all of these requirements might be used as an excuse to not invest in these qualifications. Cost is one of the most important factors to consider, and in a high-risk market like healthcare, industry providers generally don’t want to spend more than they have to. The end result is that an organization might utilize cloud-based technology to cut their costs, but there is no guarantee that they will be able to sustain “meaningful use” as it’s defined above.

 

With that said, cloud computing has really come into its own over the past few years, providing even more great services (including security) than ever before--services that EMR/EHR can really benefit from. If you want to implement a solution that can help your medical practice reduce costs and improve functionality, or if you just want to meet the changes in industry regulations, look no further. SouthBridge Consulting can help your business implement high-quality technology solutions designed to increase profits and efficiency. To learn more, reach out to us at (281) 816-6430.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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EHR certification provides a baseline security safety net

EHR certification provides a baseline security safety net | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

EHR certification and security is always top of mind in choosing a healthcare software application. Not only does a software application have to prove its clinical or infrastructure value, but if it cannot do so in a secure way it will never be the product of choice.

The security questions asked of software vendors can vary in nature. Generally they revolve around meeting HIPAA requirements for access, authentication, and encryption. In addition, having a product tested against a threat model, such as OWASP, or some other type of security audit provides an extra sense of security for potential buyers. However, the healthcare industry already has a certain level of security standards provided in EHR certification testing.

EHR certification is normally linked to EHR vendors helping their customers meet Meaningful Use requirements. Within the EHR certification, there are a set of security criteria. And any software vendor can test to these security measures as a health IT module, without testing all the other requirements related to Meaningful Use. In this way, healthcare software products can ensure that they meet the same security requirements as an EHR and give their customers peace of mind that they at least meet a certain level of security standards as defined by the ONC.

The security measures included in the 2015 Edition EHR certification include:

  • 315.d.1 Authentication, Access, Authorization
  • 315.d.2 Auditable Events and Tamper Resistance
  • 315.d.3 Audit Reports
  • 315.d.4 Amendments
  • 315.d.5 Automatic Access Time-out
  • 315.d.6 Emergency Access
  • 315.d.7 End User Device Encryption
  • 315.d.8 Integrity
  • 315.d.9 Trusted Connection
  • 315.d.10 Auditing Actions On Healthcare Information

User access

The criteria in d.1, d.5 and d.6 have to do with validating the user seeking access to electronic health information. The software application is tested in a number of different ways to ensure that unauthorized users are not allowed to authenticate or access the system. This includes having automatic time-outs to help ensure that a malicious user cannot follow behind an unsuspecting valid user. These criteria do include an option for emergency access if the need arises.

Encryption

The criteria in d.7, d.8, and d.9 focus on encryption of data, both at rest and in transport. The software application must have a way to either encrypt data at rest, or show that no personal health date is left behind once the application is closed. And for data in transit, encryption and hashing must be used to protect the data, or the use of a standard secure transport such as TLS.

Audit logging

The criteria in d.2, d.3, and d.10 focus on logging and reporting when PHI is handled. This handling of PHI can include a variety of actions such as querying, changing, deleting, adding, printing, or copying. Other related actions are logged as well, such as changing user privileges, disabling the audit log itself, or turning off encryption. All of the logging is required to be included in a report that can be run over a given date range.

These three key areas of security (user access, encryption, and audit logging) provide a baseline that all software applications can meet. Certainly, any EHR is going to meet these security requirements because of Meaningful Use, but other software vendors can also test to these requirements to ensure the industry that they are on par with EHRs when it comes to security. This helps give providers the peace of mind they want, while setting the same baseline for all vendors in healthcare across the board.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

Contact Details :
inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

more...
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