The EHR and Rage Against the Machine | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

The EHR is the latest focus of our rage against the machine. Case in point: Chrissy Farr’s poke at the EHR in today’s Fast Company. Red meat for angry old doctors.

 

What might be interesting is to take a bunch of millennial doctors and make them work for a month with clipboards, fax machines, mailed letters and emulsion films on view boxes? Then we could write a story about the joy and efficiency of manilla folder medicine.

 

I suspect it would put things in perspective.

We fancy ourselves as victims of our technology. But while EHRs have a long way to go, it’s a long way back to paper.

 

I was in an elevator at Texas Children’s Hospital this weekend where there were a number of people looking at their smartphones.  An older gentleman in the elevator remarked shaking his head, “I remember a time when people used to talk.”

 

Actually, no one talked in elevators.  We’ve always stood the same direction and stared at the numbers at the top of the door.

 

It’s easy to blame technology on our human shortcomings.  It’s been suggested that the adoption of EHR has us ignoring patients.  But in the old days, we scribbled on paper.  Irresponsible resident and medical student conduct with social media are blamed on the platform.  But trainees have always done and said stupid things.

Blame it our chauvinistic human bias:  “It’s not me, it’s the machine.”

 

While there are those of us who share a perverse relationship with our tools, it’s important to remember that the world wasn’t necessarily rainbows and unicorns before [insert technology of choice] appeared.