EHR and Health IT Consulting
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EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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New Year Brings New EHR

New Year Brings New EHR | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it
Looking forward to a triumphant 2015, Clay County Hospital, located in Ashland, AL has completed its successful implementation of its EHR, Emergency Department Information System (EDIS), with the hospital’s partner, veEDIS Clinical Systems, LLC. Utilized by nurses and physicians to document patient care, veEDIS is a key ingredient in modernizing technology and patient record-keeping, as well as the authorized, confidential exchange of patient information at this facility.

veEDIS is Emergency Department software designed to streamline emergency department management. It combines real emergency department experience with advanced technology to provide software that assists in meeting quality patient care and safety goals.

From a clinical benefits perspective, Clay County Hospital will use veEDIS to deliver innovative solutions to clinical decision-makers through real-time comprehensive nurse and physician documentation. Gathering and delivering patient data quickly and accurately on a web browser, veEDIS provides a cost efficient communication flow that increases Emergency Department efficiency and enhances quality of care and patient safety.

From an executive benefits perspective, Clay County Hospital will use veEDIS to provide real-time information for monitoring and decision making to promote the clinical and financial health of the hospital.

Clay County Hospital, a general medical/surgical acute care hospital with 53 licensed beds, serves Clay County and the surrounding areas. With annual ER visits of 5400, inpatient admissions of 1300, and outpatient visits of 15,600, the hospital provides an array of inpatient, outpatient, and support services and is actively involved in a variety of community health related activities.

The Emergency Department of Clay County Hospital is a Level III – Type Service. Twenty-four hour care is provided to patients ranging from neonate, infant, pediatric, adolescent, adult, and geriatric age groups. There is 24-hour emergency room physician coverage provided by Acute Care Incorporated.

Linda U. Jordan, Administrator at Clay County Hospital commented that “the veEDIS system, created by ER physicians and nurses, allows our ER staff to document patient care more effectively and efficiently. Other hospitals in Alabama and across the nation have found veEDIS to be adaptable to their current methods of patient care and have benefited from using a software system that is more clinical rich than many other systems found in larger facilities.”
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ProModel Analytics Solutions's curator insight, February 6, 2015 8:00 AM

Another EHR system installed.

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OMB Reviewing Proposed Stage 3 Meaningful Use Requirements | EHRintelligence.com

OMB Reviewing Proposed Stage 3 Meaningful Use Requirements | EHRintelligence.com | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is one step closer to issuing a notice of proposed rulemaking (NRPM) for the next stage of meaningful use requirements for the Medicare EHR Incentive Program.

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is currently reviewing the proposed rule for Stage 3 Meaningful Use that is expected to be published in February.

Few details about the requirements for Stage 3 appear in the rule submitted to the OMB by the Department of Health & Human Services as part of the Unified Agenda — that is, with the exception of the following:

In this proposed rule, CMS will implement Stage 3, another stage of the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Program as required by ARRA. We are proposing the Stage 3 criteria that EP’s, eligible hospitals, and CAHs must meet in order to successfully demonstrate meaningful use under the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs, focusing on advanced use of EHR technology to promote improved outcomes for patients.  Stage 3 will also propose changes to the reporting period, timelines, and structure of the program, including providing a single definition of meaningful use. These changes will provide a flexible, yet, clearer framework to ensure future sustainability of the EHR program and reduce confusion stemming from multiple stage requirements.

The rule before the OMG also indicates that CMS will coordinate with the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology to ensure that EHR certification criteria and certified EHR technology will be in place when Stage 3 goes into effect no earlier than 2017.

During a Health IT Policy Committee meeting in March, the group voted to approve 19 objectives recommended by the Meaningful Use Workgroup. Those recommendations fall into four categories of care improvements:

Improving Quality of Care and Safety
1. Clinical decision support
2. Order tracking
3. Demographics/patient information
4. Care planning — advance directive
5. Electronic notes
6. Hospital labs
7. Unique device identifiers

Engaging Patients and Families in their Care
8. View, download, transmit
9. Patient generated health data
10. Secure messaging
11. Visit Summary/clinical summary
12. Patient education

Improving Care Coordination
13. Summary of care at transitions
14. Notifications
15. Medication reconciliation

Improving Population and Public Health
16. Immunization history
17. Registries
18. Electronic lab reporting
19. Syndromic surveillance

Before any of the proposed rule’s requirements for Stage 3 Meaningful Use are enacted, the NPRM must made available for public comment which has the potential to influence the requirements of the final rule. Given the resistance CMS has faced as a result of Stage 2 Meaningful Use, the federal agency is likely to receive requests for greater flexibility and timing from healthcare organizations and industry groups.


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Physician Office EHR Adoption Increases, Meaningful Use Lags

Physician Office EHR Adoption Increases, Meaningful Use Lags | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it
Physician offices continue to adopt EHR technology so why is meaningful use participation being ignored by these eligible providers?

Physician office EHR adoption continued its upward swing between 2013 and 2014, but less than half of physicians in a recent survey report plans to attest for Stage 2 Meaningful Use.

The last bit of news comes from a survey of nearly 2000 members of SERMO, the online social network for physicians. Frank Irving of Medical Practice Insider reports that 55 percent of respondents will not demonstrate Stage 2 Meaningful Use in 2015, 994 of 1816 to participants.

Eligible professionals have until the end of next month — February 28 — to attest for meaningful use in 2014. According to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), more than 257,000 EPs are receiving 2015 Medicare payment adjustments for failing to demonstrate meaningful use as part of the Medicare EHR Incentive Program prior to 2014. That number is less close to 60,000 EPs who successfully filed for a meaningful use hardship exception during one of the two application periods in 2014. Those failing to demonstrate meaningful use in 2014 will be subject to Medicare payment adjustments in 2016.

It is unclear whether respondents to the SERMO survey are referencing their 2014 meaningful use reporting as the attestation period runs through the end of February 2015 or if they have chosen one of several options in a meaningful use flexibility rule or received a meaningful use hardship exception. That 55 percent could therefore prove misleading.

Continued growth of physician office EHR use

Whatever the reasons behind these responses from SERMO members, physician office EHR adoption is on the rise. An ongoing study by SK&A indicates a ten-percent increase in physician office adoption of EHR technology between 2013 and 2014. What’s more, it provides a breakdown of the top-five EHR vendors nationally and regionally.

At the national level, Epic Systems controls 30 percent of the market followed by eClinicialWorks (22%), Allscripts (19%), Practice Fusion (16%), and NextGen Healthcare (13%).

A closer look by region shows a close competition between Epic Systems and eClinicalWorks for EHR selection by physician offices.

The former dominates the West, Midwest, and East regions of the United States. The latter holds sway in the South and New England regions. Here’s a region-by-region breakdown:

West
Epic (25%)
eCW (23%)
Practice Fusion (20%)
NextGen (17%)
Allscripts (15%)

Midwest
Epic (33%)
Allscripts (24%)
eCW (18%)
Practice Fusion (14%)
NextGen (11%)

South
eCW (30%)
Allscripts (23%)
Practice Fusion (17%)
Epic (16%)
NextGen (14%)

East
Epic (33%)
Allscripts (24%)
eCW (18%)
Practice Fusion (14%)
NextGen (11%)

New England
eCW (31%)
Allscripts (24%)
Practice Fusion (17%)
Epic (16%)
NextGen (14%)

Interestingly, where neither is first both companies drop to the third or fourth spots. Considering that both companies specialize in working with health systems and hospitals, their domination of various markets may indicate the ownership of physician practices and use of that health system’s or hospital’s EHR technology.

Despite the increased implementation and use of EHR technology by physician offices, their physicians have a ways to go in order to keep pace with the evolution of the EHR Incentive Programs.


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Time for Government to Step Out of the Way of EHR and Let the Market Takeover? | Hospital EMR and EHR

Time for Government to Step Out of the Way of EHR and Let the Market Takeover? | Hospital EMR and EHR | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

The always interesting and insightful John Moore from Chilmark research has a post up that asks a very good question. The question is whether it’s time for the government to get out of the EHR regulation business and let the market forces back in so they can innovate. I love this section of the post which describes our current situation really well:

But as often happens with government initiatives, initial policy to foster adoption of a given technology can have unintended consequences no matter how well meaning the original intent may be.

During my stint at MIT my research focus was diffusion of technology into regulated markets. At the time I was looking at the environmental market and what both the Clean Air Act and Clean Water Act did to foster technology adoption. What my research found was that the policies instituted by these Acts led to rapid adoption of technology to meet specific guidelines and subsequently contributed to a cleaner environment. However, these policies also led to a complete stalling of innovation as the policies were too prescriptive. Innovation did not return to these markets until policies had changed allowing market forces to dictate compliance. In the case of the Clean Air Act, it was the creation of a market for trading of COx, SOx and NOx emissions.

We are beginning to see something similar play-out in the HIT market. Stage one got the adoption ball rolling for EHRs. Again, this is a great victory for federal policy and public health. But we are now at a point where federal policy needs to take a back seat to market forces. The market itself will separate the winners from the losers.

His points highlight another reason why I think that ONC should blow up meaningful use. In my plan, I basically see it as the government getting out of the EHR business. I do disagree with John Moore’s comments that the government should step away from interoperability. If they do, we just won’t have interoperability. I guess he’d make the argument that value based reimbursement will force it, but not in the same way that the rest of the EHR incentive money could force the issue.

I have learned that to really get out of this game or even do what I describe will take an act of congress. HHS can’t do this without their help. Although, they could get pretty close. Plus, maybe they could exert their influence to get congress to act, but I won’t be holding my breathe on that one.


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