EHR and Health IT Consulting
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EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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NYC Hospitals Face Massive Problems With Epic Install

NYC Hospitals Face Massive Problems With Epic Install | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

A municipal hospital system’s Epic EMR install has gone dramatically south over the past two years, with four top officials being forced out and a budget which has more than doubled.


In early 2013, New York City-based Health and Hospitals Corp. announced that it had signed a $302 million EMR contract with Epic. The system said that it planned to implement the Epic EMR at 11 HHC hospitals, four long term care facilities, six diagnostic treatment centers and more than 70 community-based clinics.


The 15-year contract, which was set to be covered by federal funding, was supposed to cover everything from soup to nuts, including software and database licenses, professional services, testing and technical training, software maintenance, and database support and upgrades.


Fast forward to the present, and the project has plunged into crisis. The budget has expanded to $764 million, and HHC’s CTO, CIO, the CIO’s interim deputy and the project’s head of training have been given the axe amidst charges of improper billing. Seven consultants — earning between $150 and $185 an hour — have also been kicked off of the payroll.


With HHC missing so many top leaders, the system has brought in a consulting firm to stabilize the Epic effort. Washington, DC-based Clinovations, which brought in an interim CMIO, CIO and other top managers to HHC, now has a $4 million, 15-month contract to provide project management.


The Epic launch date for the first two hospitals in the network was originally set for November 2014 but has been moved up to April 2016, according to the New York PostHHC leaders say that the full Epic launch should take place in 2018 if all now goes as planned. The final price tag for the system could end up being as high as $1.4 billion, the newspaper reports.


So how did the massive Epic install effort go astray? According to an audit by the city’s Technology Development Corp., the project has been horribly mismanaged. “At one point, there were 14 project managers — but there was no leadership,” the audit report said.


The HHC consultants didn’t help much either, according to an employee who spoke to the Post. The employee said that the consultants racked up travel, hotels and other expenses to train their own employees before they began training HHC staff.


HHC is now telling the public that things will be much better going forward. Spokeswoman Ana Marengo said that the chain has adopted a new oversight and governance structure that will prevent the implementation from falling apart again.”We terminated consultants, appointed new leadership, and adopted new timekeeping tools that will help strengthen the management of this project,” Marengo told the newspaper.


What I’d like to know is just what items in the budget expanded so much that a $300-odd million all-in contract turned into a $1B+ debacle. While nobody in the Post articles has suggested that Epic is at fault in any of this, it seems to me that it’s worth investigating whether the vendor managed to jack up its fees beyond the scope of the initial agreement. For example, if HHC was forced to pay for more Epic support than it had originally expected it wouldn’t come cheap. Then again, maybe the extra costs mostly come from paying for people with Epic experience. Epic has driven up the price of these people by not opening up the Epic certification opportunities.


On the surface, though, this appears to be a high-profile example of a very challenging IT project that went bad in a hurry. And the fact that city politics are part of the mix can’t have been helpful. What happened to HHC could conceivably happen to private health systems, but the massive budget overrun and billing questions have government stamped all over them. Regardless, for New York City patients’ sake I hope HHC gets the implementation right from here on in.

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Burke Autrey's curator insight, September 21, 2016 10:56 AM
Tracking companies who bring in Interim executive talent when it counts... Congratulations to Clinovations and HHC who clearly see the value of tapping into interim executives.
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Can True EHR Customization Help Physician Practices Survive?

Can True EHR Customization Help Physician Practices Survive? | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it
In the rapidly-evolving EHR market, one size definitely does not fit all and true EHR customization can make all the difference.

It is a commonly-held belief that the healthcare system in the United States is in need of more than a fairly steep overhaul. In fact, the once highly sought after profession of doctor has shifted to become one of the more embattled jobs nationwide.

Many healthcare professionals are now forced into the impossible situation of navigating exploitation by insurance companies and government regulations, all while grappling with the challenges of providing quality patient care, keeping their practices afloat, earning a living and paying back often-exorbitant medical school loans. If anything, in today’s world it would surprise most people to know how little doctors actually make, relative to the effort and investment in their careers they are required to put in, day in and day out.

This is a critical issue facing the US today, as tens of thousands of physicians are closing their practices every year and either retiring or becoming employees of large healthcare corporations. This is having a significant impact on accessibility and affordability of medical care. With fewer doctors available and many individuals seeking care from “corporatized” healthcare providers, not only is the personal relationship between doctor and patient lost, the cost of medical care at corporate-run medical facilities is substantially higher than ever before.

Capable and cost-effective?

So, the question becomes — how do doctors maximize their healthcare practice and record management processes, cost-efficiently and effectively? Enter the wide variety of EHR and EMR solutions that have flooded the market in recent years, each promising to streamline the process and take the guesswork out of compliance to the government’s evolving mandates that regulate healthcare record-keeping.

In addition to managing healthcare records, doctors also need a secure and HIPAA compliant scheduling system, medical devices integration, practice management system, e-prescription, lab interfaces, patient engagement, and tele-medicine. Of course, these systems must also be equipped with disaster recovery and business continuity safeguards.

And while there are many current solutions on the market which range from open source to a one-stop package that practices implement directly on their end, they miss one crucial element. Each doctor practices his/her profession in their own unique way, and this extends to all aspects of their work, from patient care to record keeping and practice management. Just as Dr. Lawrence ‘Rusty’ Hofmann in The Huffington Post, describes it, EHRs are like Model T Ford: Any Color You Want As Long As It’s Black.” The majority of these solutions hitting the market today just don’t cut the mustard when it comes to really addressing the needs of our country’s doctors and healthcare practices.

Furthermore, while the creators of many of these packaged EHR solutions claim to be “customizable,” they are actually merely “configurable.” Instead of allowing the user the autonomy and flexibility to create a system with parameters that align with their own specific practice and its operational goals, editable functions are typically limited to creating additional fields in the forms — barely paying lip service to the task of meeting the true needs of healthcare professionals in this country.

These solutions also require heavy reliance on a computer screen, which often hinders a doctor’s ability to provide the standard of care and bedside manner that comes with more face-to-face interactions inquiring into pain, ailments, and body language from patients. This seminal aspect of the healthcare field is threatened by one-size-fits-all systems that squelch the nuances between practices and the differing techniques doctors use to treat their patients. This diversity between providers is central to continued advancements in the medical field and breakthroughs in patient care and disease treatment.

Diversity and true EHR customization rule

So then, what is the answer? In my opinion, built from countless conversations with doctors on this issue, it is EHR systems that provide an easy-to-use interface that are truly customized to fit the ways in which each doctor treats patients, approaches his/her field, and manages their practice, in a cost-effective package that does not require a huge up-front investment. Additionally, everyone within the practice should have access to the system, to ensure continuity in an often-volatile EHR market that typically sees 45-50% churn annually.

In short, it is crucial that developers of these software tools accommodate doctors’ needs first, rather than create a framework that expects doctors to squeeze themselves into a pre-defined structure, often asking them to sacrifice their individuality, professional approach, and expertise.

This approach, which represents incredible opportunity in the once thought to be saturated EHR market, is the essential step to rescuing our doctors from their often embattled position, bringing them back to the esteemed position they once held, all while improving our overall patient experiences and outcomes in the process.


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Top 10 EHR vendors in physician offices

Top 10 EHR vendors in physician offices | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

There's little question that Cerner and Epic are the giants in the EHR field. Epic is dominant not only in the scope of its market share but also in the depth of its client base. Mayo Clinic announced last month that it would be abandoning its three current EHR systems in favor of a new contract with Epic, which will now be the healthcare icon's sole EHR provider and strategic partner. Jilted in the deal were GE and Cerner, who were the providers of Mayo's current systemsalthough if you tallied the figures when Cerner acquired Siemens' EHR unit for $1.3 billion, it still had the largest US market share of any vendor, with 1,132 acute care hospitals. 

But a more granular look at market share amongst physician offices shows a slightly different market picture.



Epic is still on top, but only by a percentage point (eClinicalworks is close on its heels). And as you might expect, Epic's client base skews heavily towards larger practices, dominating the 41+ practice market at 54%. On the lower end of the scale (1 - 3), Epic, eClinicalworks, Allscripts and Practice Fusion are all within a percentage point or two of one another. 

Cerner, notably, is way down the list across the board in the physician practice world, taking just 3.5% of the overall market. So is athenahealth, at 3.3% overall and just 0.4% and 0.8% in the 26 to 40 and 41 and up segments. This tallies with the cloud-based vendor's ongoing investments in the inpatient market, however: In January, the cloud-based provider purchased start-up RazorInsights to move into the 50-bed and under sector, a niche that accounts for one-third of all hospitals in the US; and last week the company announced that it has purchased WebOMR, Beth Israel Deaconess' cloud-based, stage 2-certified EHR, for commercial development in the hospital setting.


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Epic Systems Wins Big in “Best of KLAS” EHR Rankings

Epic Systems Wins Big in “Best of KLAS” EHR Rankings | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Epic Systems Wins Big in “Best of KLAS” EHR Rankings

A number of Epic Systems products have achieved top marks in the annual Best of KLAS health IT and EHR rankings, including best overall physician practice vendor and best overall software suite in addition to other awards for acute care, ambulatory care, health information exchange (HIE) and patient portals.  The recognition signals a return to dominance for the health IT giant, which temporarily lost its top title to athenahealth in 2013.

“We are honored to be able to continue to work with talented healthcare providers to create the annual Best in KLAS report. Their feedback is beneficial as vendors strive for excellence,” said Adam Gale, CEO and president of KLAS Research in a news release announcing another winner, Phytel, which was named the top population heath management vendor. “We also look forward to expanding our global research initiative to evaluate additional products/services that impact both provider and vendor success.”

Other familiar names featured frequently in the latest report, including Impact Advisors, winner of the overall IT services firm category, Cerner Corporation for best small ambulatory EHR, and athenahealth for small and mid-sized practice management.  Epic, however, snagged the ribbon for large ambulatory practice management.

Accenture Health may be getting a few more phone calls in the next few months after being named best ICD-10 consulting firm, while Optum’s computer assisted coding (CAC) expertise won the category for the in-demand technology.  For clinical documentation improvement (CDI), another critical ICD-10 competency, KLAS awarded first prize to Navigant.

Overall, Epic received eleven recognitions from the independent research company, which indicates how deeply and widely the company has been able to integrate itself into the healthcare industry’s IT needs.  In contrast, Cerner received three nods and athenahealth bagged two, while McKesson and MEDITECH had one apiece.  Last year, athenahealth had five honors to its name, with Chairman and CEO Jonathan Bush claiming that his company’s victory over Epic for ultimate prize was a triumph of “nimble, innovative models” over the “old guard of HIT leaders.”

Putting aside Epic’s runaway dominance – and athenahealth’s slip from the spotlight this year – Bush may have been correct in saying that new contenders are challenging the big names that seemed so solidified in the early days of the EHR Incentive Programs.  The large number and diversity of winners shows that the marketplace continues to be fragmented, giving new companies a chance to offer the intuitive, user-friendly, feature-rich EHRs that healthcare organizations are clambering for.

With EHR replacement still a very strong force in the marketplace, vendors have a strong incentive to claw their way past their competitors onto EHR ranking lists that give them visibility and credibility in an environment of weary mistrust.

“We are all part of a community of care,” Gale said of the 2013 winners list. “From the vendors that provide services and advance healthcare technology, to KLAS, who produces insights on vendor performance, to the providers who administer care, our joint efforts can make a difference in the lives of the patients.”

“To the healthcare providers, your effort to be heard and counted is critical. It is your voice, amplified by KLAS, that can drive improvements to healthcare technology and services. To the healthcare vendors who diligently seek to align with provider needs, we thank you for your unwavering determination to deliver excellence with passion. We commend your efforts to truly be Best in KLAS.”


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