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EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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The Myth of Too Many Clicks

The Myth of Too Many Clicks | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

We have seen a number of recent blog posts and tweets complaining about EHRs having ‘too many clicks.’ A number of people have proclaimed that reducing the number of clicks in an EHR as a method to improve EHR Usability.


Multiple clicks are not a deterrent to usability and user satisfaction, in fact there are many occasions where having more clicks may actually improve usability. In our experience facilitating a large number of usability tests, people don’t complain about having too many clicks. Making the click is automatic.The crux of the matter is that each click represents a decision point within a workflow. It isn’t too many clicks, it is too many decisions!


“Vague, non-descript (click here, learn more), misleading or jargon-filled links cause people to hesitate, to question. Is this the right decision? This amplifies the click itself and it is what has created this myth of ‘too many clicks.’


Imagine taking a road trip to someplace you’ve never been and your directions don’t quite match up with the road signs. Was that Exit 7 or Route 7? Main Street or Main Avenue? Your trip would feel much longer and you’d arrive much grumpier than if you made the same journey with clear directions. You’d say, “Wow, that didn’t take as long as I thought,” regardless of the turns in the road.” (Stephanie Lumas)

The difference is confidence. If someone is confident knowing what they will find, or what happens after they make a click, it is a non-decision.


Don’t worry about having multiple clicks on your EHR, but just make sure your users knows, in advance, the effect of clicking will have on their workflow.


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EHR Quality Reporting Rewarded through $36.3M in HHS Funding | EHRintelligence.com

EHR Quality Reporting Rewarded through $36.3M in HHS Funding | EHRintelligence.com | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it
EHR quality reporting led to $4.9 million in ACA awards to 332 health centers.

The Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) has rewarded the quality improvement efforts of health centers with $36.3 million in Affordable Care Act (ACA) funding.

“This funding rewards health centers that have a proven track record in clinical quality improvement, which translates to better patient care, and it allows them to expand and improve their systems and infrastructure to bring the highest quality primary care services to the communities they serve,” HHS Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell said in an official statement.

The rewards spans four distinct kinds of quality improvement achievements.

The first award went to 361 health centers and totaled $11.2 million for health center quality leaders, those clinical settings scoring in the top 30 percent of all health centers based on best overall clinical outcomes.

The second award of $2.5 million rewarded 57 national quality leaders for surpassing national clinical standards for chronic disease, preventive care, and perinatal/prenatal care.

Clinical quality improvers — demonstrated at least a 10-percent improvement in clinical quality measures between 2012 and 2013 — were recipients of largest sum of awards, $17.7 million. The award goes to 1,058 health centers.

The last category of awards recognized 332 EHR reporters which received $4.9 million for reporting clinical quality measures (CQMs) for their entire patient population.

According to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), ACA-established Health Center Program comprises close to 1,300 health centers operating in more than 9,200 delivery sites in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and US territories and treating approximately 21.7 million patients.

The ACA earmarked $11 billion to be disbursed over a five-year period to support the creation, expansion, and operation of health centers.

In the past year alone, 43 Health Center Controlled Networks received $21 million in rewards specifically for EHR adoption and meaningful use with requirements to “include at least 10 Health Center Program grantees and overall will provide support to more 700 health centers nationwide.”

In a recent brief, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) demonstrated that incentive dollars and looming financial penalties are driving EHR adoption and meaningful use.

The chance to benefit from tens of thousands of dollars from the EHR Incentive Programs was cited as a major influence for 62% of physician providers participating in the 2013 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Physician Workflow Survey. Another major factor were the ONC-funded regional extension centers whose availability during Stage 1 Meaningful Use and beyond influenced 35 percent of respondents to adopt a certified EHR technology and demonstrate meaningful use as part of the EHR Incentive Programs.

The major takeaway from the HHS and ONC announcements is the integral role health IT-related funding in the form of incentives or awards plays in transforming the care delivery and coordination through the innovative use of technology.



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Amazing Charts Releases 2015 Predictions for Medicine and Technology

Amazing Charts Releases 2015 Predictions for Medicine and Technology | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Amazing Charts, a leading developer of Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems for physician practices, today issued its healthcare predictions for 2015.

1.      Membership Medicine Comes on Strong: The patient membership approach to medicine will grow in all forms, including value-based Direct Primary Care (DPC), high-end Concierge Medicine, and primary care services contracted directly by employers. Market-driven medicine, fueled by changes occurring in healthcare today, such as inexpensive health plans with very high deductibles, will continue to encourage consumers to explore more cost-effective alternatives for primary care.

2.      Patients Help Define the Experience: The patient, in partnership with the provider, will help define the care experience going forward. This trend will be powered by technologies that enhance face-to-face interaction in the exam room. One example is the projection of an EHR onto a large display screen to facilitate information sharing between provider and patient. This in turn will help reduce errors and misdiagnosis, as well as motivate patients to take a renewed interest in their own healthcare and treatment options.

3.      EHRs Get Personalized: The EHR market will further mature and become customizable for individual patient needs and treatment plans. Intuitive data analytics will play a critical role here, helping clinicians measure, assess and manage their specific patient populations to better define specific gaps in clinical care and introduce the latest evidenced-based treatment procedures or diagnostic techniques.

4.      Wearable Health Devices Empower Patients: Led by FitBit, the market for mobile health monitoring devices saw explosive growth in 2014. Now Apple is entering the scene, and 2015 promises to see even more apps and devices introduced to consumers. How the government regulates these devices may depend on how they are marketed. For example, a glucometer could be unregulated if the intent is for a user to monitor blood sugar levels for better nutrition. If the same glucometer is marketed for monitoring diabetics, however, it may be more strictly regulated as a medical device.

5.      EHR Interoperability Still Around the Corner: While all EHRs will not be able to seamlessly communicate in 2015, the core infrastructure for increased data liquidity will largely be in place. The data standards of the CCDA and its predecessor, the CCD, are increasingly used by EHR vendors. In addition, Meaningful Use Stage 2 mandates that patients can receive a digital summary of their own records on demand. These positive steps forward will combine in 2015 to get us closer to the promise of data interoperability.

6.      EHR Switching Accelerates: Many practices selected an EHR system lured by the promise of Meaningful Use incentives and now find themselves dissatisfied with their decision, primarily because the solution is not user friendly and slows them down. Despite barriers to switching systems, we will witness a mass conversion of solutions toward EHRs that better meet providers’ expectations and requirements.

7.      The Doctor Will NOT Be In: In 2015 and beyond we will see reimbursements drive the “virtual” appointment, whereby health plans will reimburse clinicians for online patient visits. Patients and their providers will connect over virtual platforms for scheduling, reviewing test results, writing prescriptions, etc. As they do, more and more insurers will follow suit as technology advances and claims its place in the doctor’s office.


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