EHR and Health IT Consulting
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EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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Notable Launches EHR-Integrated Voice-Powered Apple Watch App

Notable Launches EHR-Integrated Voice-Powered Apple Watch App | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Notable, an emerging digital health startup in voice-powered healthcare has launched the first wearable voice-powered smart assistant for physicians that will transform the healthcare experience. Available as a white labeled solution for wearables, the platform leverages artificial intelligence and voice recognition technology to automate and structure every physician-patient interaction as well as eliminate the vast majority of clinical administrative work. The Notable team consists of technology industry veterans. To date, Notable has closed an initial $3M round of seed funding led by Greylock Partners, with additional participation from Maverick Ventures and 8VC.

 

The amount of time physicians spend on paperwork and administrative tasks continues to increase with most spending more than 10 hours per week. While EHRs have digitized health records, the overhead of data collection often leads to patient data that is sparse and lacks information. These systemic challenges burden patient care with overhead and inefficiency, and lead to physician burnout as time is increasingly spent behind a computer instead of on patient care.

 

Notable is the first ever voice-driven medical assistant app built for the Apple Watch. It utilizes voice wake features that make it possible for clinicians to complete an encounter with just one tap. Notable automatically structures conversations, dictations, orders, and recommends the appropriate billing codes. Data is automatically entered into the EHR in a secure manner using robotic process automation. Since its beta launch, Notable has greater than a 98.5 percent approval rate, saves physicians at least an hour per day, and is already powering thousands of visits per month in multiple specialties.

 

Notable Launches EHR-Integrated Voice-Powered Apple Watch App for Physicians
by Jasmine Pennic 05/08/2018 0 Comments

 

Notable Launches Voice-Powered Assistant for Physicians on Apple Watch

 

Notable, an emerging digital health startup in voice-powered healthcare has launched the first wearable voice-powered smart assistant for physicians that will transform the healthcare experience. Available as a white labeled solution for wearables, the platform leverages artificial intelligence and voice recognition technology to automate and structure every physician-patient interaction as well as eliminate the vast majority of clinical administrative work. The Notable team consists of technology industry veterans. To date, Notable has closed an initial $3M round of seed funding led by Greylock Partners, with additional participation from Maverick Ventures and 8VC.

 

The amount of time physicians spend on paperwork and administrative tasks continues to increase with most spending more than 10 hours per week. While EHRs have digitized health records, the overhead of data collection often leads to patient data that is sparse and lacks information. These systemic challenges burden patient care with overhead and inefficiency, and lead to physician burnout as time is increasingly spent behind a computer instead of on patient care.

 

Notable is the first ever voice-driven medical assistant app built for the Apple Watch. It utilizes voice wake features that make it possible for clinicians to complete an encounter with just one tap. Notable automatically structures conversations, dictations, orders, and recommends the appropriate billing codes. Data is automatically entered into the EHR in a secure manner using robotic process automation. Since its beta launch, Notable has greater than a 98.5 percent approval rate, saves physicians at least an hour per day, and is already powering thousands of visits per month in multiple specialties.

 

“We see massive opportunity in Notable and the work they are doing to fundamentally change the physician-patient experience,” said Jerry Chen, partner at Greylock Partners. “The Notable team’s expertise in building products in highly regulated industries gives them an unparalleled advantage, enabling them to create the first voice-powered application and solve a true problem for physicians.”

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101 Tips to Make Your EMR and EHR More Useful – EHR Tips 81-85

101 Tips to Make Your EMR and EHR More Useful – EHR Tips 81-85 | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Time for the second entry covering Shawn Riley’s list of 101 Tips to Make your EMR and EHR More Useful. I hope you’re enjoying the series.

85. Test, retest, and test the network and wireless
Far too many EHR implementations fail because of basic technology issues. Of course, the blame usually gets placed squarely on the head of the EHR company. However, in many of the cases, the EHR company has no control over the issues you have. Your local wireless and network is one place where you can doom an EHR installation and the EHR company can do nothing about it. If you want to have a great EHR installation make sure you have a great network and/or wireless infrastructure set up and tested.

84. Have ONE number to call
This recommendation applies more to large EMR installations than it does to small ones. The basic suggestion is not to give one phone number for EMR issues (ie. I can’t login) and another for technology related issues (ie. my PC crashed). The problem with multiple lines is that people don’t generally know the difference between an EMR issue and a PC issue. At the end of the day, they’re likely to consider almost everything an EMR issue. So, they’re going to call the same number anyway. You might as well just have one number that knows how to triage the issue well and direct them to the right support resource.

83. Remember who the support team’s customers are
Another recommendation for hospital EHR support. It is a great idea to remember that the support team’s customers are the clinicians that are calling for help. Prepare them for the calls they’re going to get. While clinicians are highly educated, that doesn’t guarantee that their education included even basic computer skills. You’ll be surprised how many of the issues have to do with basic computer skills as much as any EMR specific support.

82. Have a communication strategy for when things go wrong
Things are bound to go wrong. So, be ready to communicate those issues. Don’t sweep the issues under the rug either. Communicate more than is necessary. It won’t hurt as much to over communicate as it will to not communicate something important.

81. Make all of your planning very public within your organization
The fastest way to get buy in for an EHR project is to involve your organization in the planning process. Yes, that means that you’re going to hear some harsh feedback from people about what you’ve planned. Be grateful that you’re hearing the feedback during the planning stage when you can work to do something about it. That’s much better than being half way through the project and hearing the harsh criticism of your project.

Time for the second entry covering Shawn Riley’s list of 101 Tips to Make your EMR and EHR More Useful. I hope you’re enjoying the series.

85. Test, retest, and test the network and wireless
Far too many EHR implementations fail because of basic technology issues. Of course, the blame usually gets placed squarely on the head of the EHR company. However, in many of the cases, the EHR company has no control over the issues you have. Your local wireless and network is one place where you can doom an EHR installation and the EHR company can do nothing about it. If you want to have a great EHR installation make sure you have a great network and/or wireless infrastructure set up and tested.

84. Have ONE number to call
This recommendation applies more to large EMR installations than it does to small ones. The basic suggestion is not to give one phone number for EMR issues (ie. I can’t login) and another for technology related issues (ie. my PC crashed). The problem with multiple lines is that people don’t generally know the difference between an EMR issue and a PC issue. At the end of the day, they’re likely to consider almost everything an EMR issue. So, they’re going to call the same number anyway. You might as well just have one number that knows how to triage the issue well and direct them to the right support resource.

83. Remember who the support team’s customers are
Another recommendation for hospital EHR support. It is a great idea to remember that the support team’s customers are the clinicians that are calling for help. Prepare them for the calls they’re going to get. While clinicians are highly educated, that doesn’t guarantee that their education included even basic computer skills. You’ll be surprised how many of the issues have to do with basic computer skills as much as any EMR specific support.

82. Have a communication strategy for when things go wrong
Things are bound to go wrong. So, be ready to communicate those issues. Don’t sweep the issues under the rug either. Communicate more than is necessary. It won’t hurt as much to over communicate as it will to not communicate something important.

81. Make all of your planning very public within your organization
The fastest way to get buy in for an EHR project is to involve your organization in the planning process. Yes, that means that you’re going to hear some harsh feedback from people about what you’ve planned. Be grateful that you’re hearing the feedback during the planning stage when you can work to do something about it. That’s much better than being half way through the project and hearing the harsh criticism of your project.


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