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Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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Staff Training Crucial in ICD-10 Conversion Preparations

Staff Training Crucial in ICD-10 Conversion Preparations | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Healthcare providers who are behind in their ICD-10 conversion preparations may benefit from following the ICD-10 Quick Start Guide provided by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).


The five steps that providers will need to take when it comes to their ICD-10 conversion preparations are the following: (1) developing a plan, (2) training the healthcare staff, (3) updating system processes, (4) working with vendors and health insurers, and (5) testing workflow processes and systems.


When it comes to training the clinical staff (including nurses, doctors, and medical assistants) and moving forward with ICD-10 conversion preparations, it’s vital to focus on new clinical concepts and documentation obtained through ICD-10 codes. When training coding and administrative staff including coders, billers, and practice management employees, the focus should be on ICD-10 fundamentals.


CMS provides a variety of resources including webinars, national provider calls and presentations, the Road to 10 website, and email updates. Physician groups, healthcare organizations, hospitals, payers, and vendors also offer a variety of resources for medical providers who are still behind with some common ICD-10 conversion preparations.


The very first step to take is to identify the top 25 most common ICD-9 codes used in one’s medical facility. Common diagnosis codes are also available on the Road to 10 website and other resources.


Teach your healthcare and coding staff how to code the most common cases using the ICD-10 coding set. Using reports via one’s practice management software and billing documents, providers can better identify the most commonly used ICD-9 codes.


Once the top 25 codes are gathered and there is still time before the ICD-10 implementationdeadline, providers are encouraged to expand ICD-10 coding of typical cases past an additional 50 or more codes. This would ensure the majority of a provider’s cases are managed effectively under ICD-10.


Even though the ICD-10 coding set has expanded to more than 68,000 codes, providers will only need to use a small section of the set. Along with training staff, updating system processes is vital for one’s ICD-10 conversion preparations. All hardcopy and electronic forms need to be updated while information gaps should be resolved before the October 1 deadline.


Clinical documentation will need to include laterality, the number of encounters (initial or subsequent), kinds of fractures, and other information about related complications. It is useful to put together a documentation checklist detailing new concepts that should be captured with ICD-10 codes. Once systems are in place, ICD-10 end-to-end testing is crucial to ensure a healthcare facility is prepared for the October 1 deadline.


“With four months remaining to correct issues discovered during testing, the high rate of successful submission of ICD-10 codes is especially encouraging for physician offices since half the claims submitted for end-to-testing were professional claims,” the Coalition for ICD-10 commented on CMS’ latest ICD-10 end-to-end testing results. “These results indicate that significant progress has been made since the January end-to-end testing with the overall rejection rate dropping from 19 to 12 percent and ICD-10 rejections dropping from 3 to 2 percent.”

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Direct Reimbursement Solutions's curator insight, July 1, 2015 10:10 AM

Excellent advice for ICD-10 preparedness.

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Hoping for ICD-11 is “Waiting for Godot,” ICD-10 Coalition Says

Hoping for ICD-11 is “Waiting for Godot,” ICD-10 Coalition Says | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Clinging on to the current outdated ICD-9 code system until ICD-11 is ready for use at some unspecified point in the future is akin to the endless idle loitering of Vladimir and Estragon in Samuel Beckett’s classic play Waiting for Godot, says the Coalition for ICD-10 in a new opinion piece.  After waiting more than twenty years for the implementation of ICD-10, the healthcare industry simply cannot afford another two or three decades for the newest code set to be finalized and ready for use.

“Based on the World Health Organization’s (WHO) current timeline, ICD-11 is expected to be finalized and released in 2017,” the commentary explains. “For the US, however, that date is the beginning, not the end.  As with every WHO version of the ICD codes, ICD-11 would need to be adapted to meet the detailed payment policy, quality assessment and other regulatory requirements of US stakeholders.”  The country could be waiting until 2041 for the entire pre-implementation process to be completed, the Coalition adds.

Meanwhile, the healthcare industry will be forced to continue to use a significantly outdated code set that cannot account for many emerging health threats or new advances in technologies, diagnoses, and procedures.  That’s just fine with representatives from the American Medical Association (AMA), whose House of Delegates voted to reject an internal report noting that implementing the changes inherent in ICD-10 would provide an important foundation for the eventual adoption of ICD-11.  The report concluded that skipping ICD-10 all together was “not recommended” as a viable course of action, yet the AMA continues its resistance to the ICD-10 codes – and the Coalition continues to fight back against their reticence.

“The US simply cannot wait decades to replace ICD-9, a code set that was developed nearly 40 years ago,” the Coalition states. “US healthcare data is deteriorating while at the same time demand is increasing for high-quality data to support healthcare initiatives such as the Meaningful Use EHR Incentive Program, value-based purchasing, and other initiatives aimed at improving quality and patient safety and decreasing costs.”

The AMA argues that the expense of ICD-10 implementation is overwhelming for smaller physicians struggling keep their doors open, pinning the costs at anywhere from $50,000 to $225,000 for a small provider.  Despite contradictions from AHIMA, the cost of the switch has been a major selling point for opponents.

However, after two one-year delays, the tide seems to be turning in support of ICD-10.  Not only is the Coalition growing, but Congress has stepped in to enforce the idea of a 2015 due date.  Will the wait for Godot be over in October?  The Coalition would certainly like to see an end to the “unending barrage of excuses” and continual delays.

“Waiting for ICD-11 is simply not a viable option,” the blog post concludes. “The absurdity of the endless waiting in Waiting for Godot culminates in frustration: “Let us not waste our time in idle discourse! Let us do something, while we have the chance!” Yes, the wait needs to be over. It’s time to stop wasting time. It’s time to get ICD-10 implemented.”

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ICD-10 End-to-End Testing Week Shows Few Coding Errors

ICD-10 End-to-End Testing Week Shows Few Coding Errors | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has released the results of its second effective Medicare FFS ICD-10 end-to-end testing week, which took place at the end of April.


Starting on April 27 and ending on May 1, clearinghouses, payers, billing agencies, and Medicare Fee-For-Service healthcare providers participated in CMS’ second successful ICD-10 end-to-end testing week.  Medicare Administrative Contractors (MACs) and the Durable Medical Equipment (DME) MAC Common Electronic Data Interchange (CEDI) contractor assisted the individual entities during this end-to-end testing.


CMS was able to work with a wide range of providers, submitters, and claim types, as it served the majority of volunteers. The second ICD-10 end-to-end testing week shows that the federal agency will be able to successfully accept claims when the ICD-10 implementation deadline rolls around.


With 875 participants in the ICD-10 end-to-end testing period, more than 23,000 test claims were submitted at the end of April. To see the results, click here. For the most part, participants were able to send their ICD-10 claims effectively and these were processed by Medicare billing systems without any major issues, CMS reports.


In fact, the results show that the acceptance rate was higher in April than the prior ICD-10 end-to-end testing rate from January. There were less errors related to diagnosis codes on the latest batch of end-to-end testing claims.


Out of any errors that did occur, the majority were unrelated to ICD-9 or ICD-10 diagnosis codes, CMS states. Providers who are still looking to participate in ICD-10 testing with the federal agency are encouraged to take part in acknowledgement testing, which can be performed at any time until the October 1 deadline.


The last ICD-10 end-to-end testing week with CMS will take place on July 20 to July 24, 2015. The ability to volunteer for this testing week has already ended. However, any participants from January or April are welcome to participate in the July ICD-10 end-to-end testing session again and are automatically eligible to test their systems an additional time.


It is vital to continue preparing for the ICD-10 transition over the coming months. Starting on October 1, any Medicare claims that do not use an ICD-10 diagnosis code will be invalid. The Medicare claims processing systems will be unable to accept ICD-9 codes after the deadline. The last day providers can submit ICD-9 codes to CMS is September 30, 2015. Dual coding will also not be accepted after this deadline.


While there is only four months left to prepare for the ICD-10 transition, providers can still take advantage of the many resources offered by the federal agency. The Road to 10 website, for instance, is a very useful tool in preparing for the ICD-10 implementation. CMS offers a variety of solutions for providers that are struggling to meet the ICD-10 transition deadline.

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