Will Altering EHR Incentive Programs Raise EHR Implementation? | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

While the HITECH Act and meaningful use requirements under the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs have truly increased the number of healthcare providers implementing and utilizing EHR systems, new research suggests that these federal regulations may have also led to specific disparities in patient care. A study stemming from Weill Cornell Medical College found “systematic differences” between doctors who were avid participants in the EHR Incentive Programs versus those who did not invest as much time and resources into meeting meaningful use requirements.


The study was published in the June edition of Health Affairs and analyzed more than 26,000 doctors across the state of New York. Additionally, the researchers looked at payment data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the state Department of Health.


The payment data analyzed in the study stemmed from the years 2011 to 2012. The results show that participation in the Medicaid EHR Incentive Program increased by 2.4 percent during those two years. However, participation in the Medicare EHR Incentive Program rose much more quickly, showing a 15.8 percent increase in the number of providers taking part in the program and implementing certified EHR technology.


The results show that early and consistent provider participants in the EHR Incentive Programs have more financial capacity, better organization and resources for supporting EHR implementation, and previous experience using health information technology.

While meaningful use requirements pushed EHR adoption forward, the process of using the systems on a constant basis had a new set of challenges that some providers were unable to attain, the researchers said. However, the differing rates of participation in the EHR Incentive Programs is leading to higher quality care at some physician offices while others are lacking and administering lower quality healthcare services.


“The expectation is that physicians and hospitals should be electronic,” senior author Dr. Joshua Vest, an Assistant Professor of Healthcare Policy and Research at Weill Cornell Medical College, said in a public statement. “How would everybody feel if only half of the banks were electronic nowadays? Without additional support to move forward there is the potential to stall out among those who don’t have the resources or capability to adopt EHRs.”


The researchers explained that there is a “digital divide” among different healthcare providers due to the participation in the EHR Incentive Programs. These results may play a role in the future of healthcare policy. Since there are certain providers who dropped out of the Medicaid EHR Incentive Program, it may behoove federal agencies to make some significant changes to the objectives within this particular program in order to keep providers participating.


“Electronic health records are vital not only because of their ability to efficiently provide physicians with a comprehensive portrait of and decision support for their patients, but also to drive new healthcare delivery models that can improve the value and quality of clinical care,” Dr. Rainu Kaushal, Chair of the Department of Healthcare Policy and Research and the Frances and John L. Loeb Professor of Medical Informatics at Weill Cornell, said in a public statement.