Do Health IT Systems Need Greater Interoperability? | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

The medical sector is aimed at reaching the triple aim of healthcare by incorporating health IT systems and EHR technology. The triple aim focuses on improving patient care, lowering medical costs, and boosting population health outcomes.


In a Health Affairs Blog, National Coordinator for Health IT Karen B. DeSalvo discusses the landscape of information technology in the medical space.  DeSalvo emphasizes the need for interoperability among health IT systems and mentioned how the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) is developing new implementation standards. Additionally, the need for privacy and security of patient data is also asserted by DeSalvo.


The sharing of patient data through health IT systems has been a major focus for the healthcare industry over the last year. To improve EHR interoperability, ONC has listened to the health IT community to develop a roadmap for establishing strategies and opportunities to move the country toward greater health data exchange.


DeSalvo has participated in many listening sessions across the country and learned about certain issues that harm the interoperability of health IT systems and plague hospitals and providers. Rural communities in Alabama, for instance, do not have full broadband access while bordering state privacy laws in New Jersey block medical data exchange. The overall essence of DeSalvo’s discussion revolves around the importance of interoperability among health IT systems.


“I also listened to my own experiences — as a doctor, as a daughter, and as a consumer,” DeSalvo stated. “I thought of countless patients whom I have seen and those I continue to see when I am in clinic. Of visits where I did not have the information needed to make a decision that day, requiring patients to return and miss work, school, or other obligations. Of patients who want to engage and feel empowered but need not only data, but information, to help them level the playing field, to allow them to meaningfully engage.”


“Of being a caregiver for a mother dying of dementia and being frustrated at just how hard it was to get access to the information I needed to help her. And, as a public health advocate and official, needing information about my community to prioritize resources to help them address the broad determinants of health,” said DeSalvo.

Over the last six years since the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act was passed, the healthcare industry has gone forward with meeting many of the goals ONC established such as widespread implementation of EHRs and health IT systems. More and more eligible providers began meeting meaningful use requirements under the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs.


While these achievements are impressive, DeSalvo mentions the need to digitalize “the care experience across the entire care continuum” and gain “true interoperability.” ONC is currently working on a plan for both public and private sectors to gain interoperability. The next step for ONC and the healthcare industry is to go beyond meaningful use and EHR implementation in order to truly bring better health for patients across the country.