EHR and Health IT Consulting
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EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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IBM’s Watson Extracts EHR Patient Data to Improve Care

IBM’s Watson Extracts EHR Patient Data to Improve Care | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Anyone who enjoys watching the quiz show Jeopardy! has heard about the computer system Watson, which was initially developed to compete on the show but has since garnered the attention of leaders across a variety of industries. Watson can even be used to better analyze EHR patient data and lead to improved quality of care.

The company division IBM Watson Health has announced today that it is working with Epic and the Mayo Clinic to apply some of the computing capabilities of Watson to analyzing EHR patient data and systems in order to boost patient health outcomes. Providers will also gain advantages when applying Watson’s power to EHRs and gaining faster analysis of the many issues that affect a patient’s health and wellness.EHR Patient Data

Using secure, cloud-based Watson services will help physicians with clinical decision making and understanding of patients’ medical conditions. Over the last year, Epic has exchanged more than 80 million patient health records within its community and outside of it.

“Building on our recent announcement of IBM Watson Health, we are collaborating with Epic and Mayo Clinic in another important validation of the potential of Watson to be used broadly across the healthcare industry,” Mike Rhodin, Senior Vice President of IBM Watson, remarked in a public statement. “This is just the first step in our vision to bring more personalized care to individual patients by connecting traditional sources of patient information with the growing pools of dynamic and constantly growing healthcare information.”

The hope is to have Watson and Epic software be utilized to effectively create patient treatment protocols and more customized health management solutions for patients with chronic conditions. Watson would be used to bring forth relevant case studies and medical knowledge that is applicable to treating a patient when doctors and other healthcare professionals share EHR patient data with Watson in real-time.

Epic will be incorporating Watson’s computing features into its clinical decision support tools including Health Level -7 (HL7) Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). Through this combined system, clinicians will be able to more quickly access the knowledge necessary to more effectively treat patients and improve health outcomes.

IBM and Mayo Clinic is collaborating on ways to revolutionize cognitive computing by applying it to clinical trials matching among cancer patients. With the streamlined and accurate processes available through Watson’s computing capabilities, physicians are able to register patients much faster in relevant clinical trials that are customized to each individual’s needs. With more than 1 million patients seen at the Mayo Clinic every year and more than 1,000 clinical trials available year-round, integrating Watson should lead to significant progress in quickly assigning patients to innovative studies.

“Patients need answers, and Watson helps provide them quickly and more thoroughly. We are excited by Watson’s potential to efficiently provide clinical trials information at the point of care,” Dr. Steven Alberts, an oncologist at Mayo Clinic, said in a public statement.

IBM’s Watson offers significant opportunity for healthcare providers to bring about high-quality care through the use of cognitive computing capabilities tailored to each individual patient.


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How EHR Interoperability Impacts Future PCMH Success

How EHR Interoperability Impacts Future PCMH Success | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it
Despite increasing levels of EHR adoption, a new report highlights the limitations of this technology as a result of a lack of EHR interoperability.

The ability to overcome a lack of EHR interoperability through the use of complementary health IT tools will help determine the success of patient-centered medical homes, according to report published by the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative (PCPCC).

“Health systems and practices must utilize a combination of technology to provide data for population management along with practice changes that will enable the allocation of resources and personnel to patients when needed,” the authors of the report explain. “There is sizable demand in the health care marketplace for the development of compatible and functional products to meet these needs.”

The PCPCC review of peer-review studies, state government program evaluations, and industry reports between 2013 and 2014 indicates the patient-centered medical homes are improving cost, utilization, access, and satisfaction.

Of the 28 reports serving as evidence in the annual review, PCPCC found that:

  • 17 found improvements in cost
  • 24 found improvements in utilization
  • 11 found improvements in quality
  • 10 found improvements in access
  • 8 found improvements in satisfaction

PCMHs, however, are likely to face challenges moving forward related to care integration, financial support, personnel, patient and patient engagement, and technology.

Despite increasing levels of EHR adoption, the PCPCC report highlights the limitations of this technology in a healthcare environment where numerous EHR platforms are in use. Enter the challenge of EHR interoperability:

Electronic health records (EHR) are the foundational documentation and work flow tools in ambulatory practices. However, many PCMH practices are in networks with multiple EHRs. The data acquisition and interoperability challenges in such heterogeneous networks, and the lack in most, if not all, EHRs of sophisticated population health functionality results in the need for other complementary solutions.

To develop a successful health IT strategy, PCMHs will need to look beyond EHR technology if they are to address clinical documentation and workflow, population health management of chronic disease and high-risk patients, and manage the risks associated with value-based contract.

“Clinical data from EHRs is optimal but, given data acquisition challenges, an opportunistic and pragmatic approach leveraging practice management system data (pre-adjudicated claims) and lab data provides an opportunity to get started,” the report states.

The solution to non-interoperable EHR systems is expected to come in the form of network registries to ensure that all members of the PCMH have access to the most accurate and timely health data:

Unlike the health maintenance reminders in an EHR, a network registry solution gathers data from across the network and serves as a collaboration platform among providers across the continuum to drive compliance with preventive and chronic care guidelines and, most importantly, serves as a single source of “truth”.

PCMHs are making inroads in delivering high-quality care within a risk-based model. However, the complexity of their patient populations moving forward will require a health IT infrastructure sufficient to meet this complexity head on.


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The Dire Need for Healthcare Interoperability

The Dire Need for Healthcare Interoperability | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

In a recently published study, "Emergency Physician Perceptions of Medically Unnecessary Advanced Diagnostic Imaging," physician Hemal Kanzaria and co-authors uncovered that 97 percent of the over 700 responding ED physicians admit that nearly one in four advanced diagnostic imaging studies they personally order are "medically unnecessary." Worse yet, most in-hospital diagnostic imaging studies cost about five times more than their independent counterparts for the same work.

"The main perceived contributors were fear of missing a low-probability diagnosis and fear of litigation," according to the study abstract. The real contributor is that emergency physicians, and virtually every other consulting physician, is being forced to treat immediate crisis in the blind under looming threat of litigation, a callously perverse system that costs Medicare and Medicaid hundreds of billions of dollars each year, and the overall healthcare system arguably close to a trillion dollars per year in waste.


Emergency physicians, hospitalists, specialists, and even primary-care doctors, which pretty much covers anyone with a prescription pad, order lots of unnecessary or redundant tests not because the vast majority are intentionally wasteful but, because they, with rare exceptions, have no idea of what has or has not been done before them and must treat patients in the moment of crisis, not in the continuum of care.


This does not mean that ED doctors are bad at their jobs. It's just that doctors working in teams are proven to provide better care at lower cost. Much lower cost. As much as 30 percent.


Doctors work best if they can work in teams using the same information. Unfortunately, EHRs do not provide the kind of information that doctors need to be effective. They need information that helps them make informed decisions and they need to be responsible for all care and costs. When this happens, the quality of care improves. People get and stay healthier, and, costs go down.

Interoperability Hurdles


So, has spending $24.6 billion in taxpayer dollars on EHR systems been a bad idea? Not irreversibly. Some conflicts of interest that strongly inhibit the flow of data need to be addressed first:


1. It's good for EHR vendors to make it as hard as possible to move data to a competing system, denying the healthcare system as a whole.


2. It's good business for hospitals and their sub-specialist employees, whose stability relies on a steady stream of people in medical crisis, to keep data within their own walls and away from competitors.


3. It's good business for the industry as a whole because a free-flow of data means price, quality, and effectiveness transparency, forcing healthcare to compete like the rest of the economy.

And, the federal government obliges everyone with a cloak to hide behind: HIPAA.


The public is the only stakeholder in healthcare that restricting access to data is not good for.


The key to saving our healthcare system is to achieve a free flow of data and to convert that data into actionable clinical, price, and quality information for primary-care physicians, called interoperability.

Interoperability is the ability for different information technology systems and software applications to communicate, exchange data, and use the information that has been exchanged. It solves three of the most vexing problems the healthcare system and its providers face:


1. It unites a fragmented healthcare delivery system;


2. It streamlines and standardizes communication among providers; and,


3. It eliminates duplication of services.


Three Solutions to Move Forward


Karen DeSalvo, a physician and the former national coordinator for health information technology, set a goal to get the basic infrastructure in place by 2017 and to have a fully interoperable national system by 2024. That deadline has since been moved to 2017.


Considering that literally hundreds of thousands of doctors do not have or cannot afford EHR systems, nor can they afford to jump through the annual labyrinth of regulatory hoops to meet the federal government's definition of "meaningful use," and over 150 EHR manufacturers fighting for the only thing that keeps them in business — proprietary data — this goal is not only unrealistic, it is disingenuous.


But, there are companies already operational and their population health, analytics, and quality measurement systems combined with primary-care practice operational transformation, best practices training, and support that unleashes the power of that information, already generating high quality care and superior clinical outcomes at lower cost.


They do this by cutting waste and managing chronic disease effectively, which keeps patients out of the hospital. As a result, they must be independent of hospitals to avoid the conflict of interest.

Hospitals and their unions, whose lament you are already hearing, realize their vulnerability, and will fight unless you change the system to protect them. Hospitals are necessary to the public welfare and our national security.


Three simple actions can accelerate the process:


1. Funding the expansion of our interoperability capabilities and use of a common population health and analytics system with practice transformation, and requiring EHR companies to format their data in the same way and put it in the same place;


2. Limiting "out-of-network" payments to a reasonable percentage of Medicare to protect both patients and providers to protect patients and shared savings and risk programs from predatory practices; and,


3. Indemnifying doctors that use and document best practices from frivolous lawsuits.


With the kind of savings programs like these can deliver, investing the savings from just four or five Medicare beneficiaries per year for each enabled primary-care practice,  the return on investment generates savings of 100 times or more.


The hardest part is mentally disengaging from the misperception that hospitals are healthcare providers. They are not. Hospitals are medical crisis treatment and rehabilitation facilities. Hospitals cannot so much as dispense an aspirin without a doctor's approval, and doctors need to be clear of conflict of interest.


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