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EHR and Health IT Consulting
Technical Doctor's insights and information collated from various sources on EHR selection, EHR implementation, EMR relevance for providers and decision makers
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8 Best Practices for Building Better Relationships During EHR Implementation and Training 

8 Best Practices for Building Better Relationships During EHR Implementation and Training  | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

New software implementations can be a high-stress scenario in the hectic and sometimes change-averse world of healthcare. End users are under pressure to adapt to new resources while continuing to tend to the high-stakes business of patient care. Instilling confidence in users’ ability to make thorough and efficient use of new technology plays a big role in successful tech adoption. Comfort with new tools is particularly important in patient-facing roles like scheduling where staff frustration can negatively influence a patient’s first impression of the facility.

 

As EHR consultants, project managers and trainers, one of our primary goals is to engage and encourage end-users during software transitions. We lead the charge to get projects done on time and under budget without having official authority over team members within the client organization. Throughout my years working as an Epic principal trainer one thing has consistently helped me garner buy-in with project teams: building good relationships.

Good relationships with stakeholders play a pivotal role in maintaining project momentum and getting through the inevitable stress points that arise during implementation. Here are some best practices to keep in mind to put your best foot forward when building relationships with clients and end-users.

Make communication a key priority. Make sure everyone clearly understands the objective of the project and the overall plan up front to set the tone and establish team buy-in. Demonstrate that leadership is on board.

Address team expectations openly and honestly. Clearly define the expectations you have of people involved in the project. Identify and articulate specific deliverables and due dates. Meet on a weekly basis to review plans, get progress updates and identify risks that may have cropped up. Maintain a living document that changes with every meeting.

Encourage team members to take ownership. No one likes a know-it-all. One tactic I use even when I know the answer to a problem is to pose a probing question to the team and let the group come up with the solution themselves. This boosts staff confidence, helps team members feel they are contributing and keeps you from having to micromanage.

Build trust with project staff. Teams want leaders who will act as a voice for end-users. Spend at least a couple of hours with team members each week to get to know them, their pain points and their motivators. Walk throughs offer great opportunities for engagement.

Honor individuality. Don’t expect individuals to change who they are to fit the culture of the team. Some people, for example, work better independently. Recognize that and let them go. Refrain from forcing end users too far out of their comfort zone to avoid unnecessary friction.

Leverage rewards and recognition. Make it a point to celebrate staff accomplishments big and small. Peer recognition can be a strong motivator, but not all people appreciate public acknowledgement. Different rewards work for different people. Find the trigger that works for that individual. Small things like taking people to lunch can help you celebrate achievements and further develop relationships.

Make team participation fun. Humor can help diffuse project resistance and apprehension. Open presentations with a cartoon to bring fun to team meetings. During stressful times, a cartoon slide that acknowledges the pressure staff members may be facing can remind end users that they are not alone.

Invite end user feedback. Feedback loops help project managers and trainers continually get better. All EHR trainers and classes should be evaluated by end-users. This helps reveal improvement opportunities for future client projects.

At the end of the day, EHR training is not about you and how much you know. It is about making sure that users get what they need out of class. Don’t overflood their minds on day one. Demonstrate patience as staff members acclimate. Remember that relationship building and team engagement is a great way to not only share your knowledge but to learn from others as well.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
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Pros and Cons of Patient Access to Electronic Medical Records

Pros and Cons of Patient Access to Electronic Medical Records | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

Doesn’t it seem faintly ridiculous that patients have to jump through hoops to get access to information that, since it is in digital format, would be so readily available to them? Today’s patients are quite accustomed to being able to access data on demand, from whatever location on Earth, as long as they have Internet access and a mobile device or laptop computer.

 

They can, for example, log into their financial institution’s website to check their latest details. Parents of school-aged children routinely access a portal developed by their school to get information about upcoming tests, new requirements, and so on.

Furthermore, the advent of email, text messaging, and social media updates has lead to people becoming accustomed to easy communication with one another. But think about how much of an effort it is for patients to communicate with a medical practice (waiting on hold on the phone to leave a message for a nurse practitioner, for example, and then having to wait more for a reply that might not come until the following day).

 

You may have already deployed a patient portal for your organization, but are not quite sure about the protocols for sharing information. Or, you are somewhat familiar with patient portals, but you’re still not sure whether it’s a good idea to even have one and you would like more information before making an investment in this software solution.

 

Familiarizing yourself with the pros and cons of patient access to electronic medical records is essential before you pull the trigger and launch a patient portal at your organization.

Modern medical practices that have forward-thinking leaders will already have electronic health record or EHR software installed or are about to deploy it. An EHR is a database of all the records for your patients. It’s much more efficient than an antiquated, paper-based method for organizing charts in your practice. The EHR lets you keep track of all important information, from medical history, current diagnosis, details of the treatment plan and any medications that have been prescribed.

One feature of Electronic Medical Records software that medical professionals should be aware of is the patient portal, along with its benefits and potential drawbacks.

Pros of Allowing Patients to Have Access to their Electronic Medical Records

A major pro of patient portals is that they improve patient engagement. Engaged patients are more likely to stay loyal to a practice as compared to other organizations that don’t make much of an effort to connect.

Your staff can easily receive messages from patients over the portal, in a process that’s as easy as email. This cuts down on a lot of wasted time on both ends (patients forced to stay on hold to leave a message by phone, and staffers having to write down the message).

 

A patient portal reduces the total amount of time spent on the phone and can cut down on unnecessary visits. What’s more, it has been proven to reduce the number of no-shows.

Patients will be happier, since they can access their medical information using their own electronic devices, even when on the go.

They will also appreciate being able to check prescription information and request refills online. When patients need to schedule an office visit, they simply sign into the portaland make a request. This makes things easier for them as well as for your staff.

 

Finally, a patient portal eliminates one of the great drudgeries of modern medicine: patients having to fill out a big stack of paper intake forms before they have their first meeting with the doctor.

You can let them input their information through the portal (such as at a kiosk in your waiting area, or from the patient’s computer). They won’t have to fill in their address or list of allergies more than once, and your staff won’t have to transcribe information from potentially messily handwritten documents.

Cons of Allowing Patients to Have Access to their Electronic Medical Records

While there are a number of clear benefits to using a patient portal with your EHR or EMR, there are also some drawbacks to be aware of, so you can address them head-on.

For example, when you enable outside access to your EHR information via a portal, data security concerns will naturally come up. The system must use strong passwords and should include the latest encryption and other protections. Otherwise, patient data could be compromised, leading to fraud and identity theft.

A portal can be tough for some patients to comprehend, especially if they have been used to doing things the old-fashioned way. However, you can educate and acclimate patients to the portal when you explain the benefits to them.

There is also the issue of patients being exposed to more medical jargon then they are used to, including acronyms and strange Latin terms for body parts. But they can always look up terms they are unfamiliar with, or simply ask a member of your team for an explanation.

 

Your older patients may not be very tech-savvy, which could hinder their efforts to log in and access data through the portal. But portals interfaces can be easily simplified and a simple training brochure or online video could make a big difference in getting more patients used to the idea of using the system.

It’s natural to have a number of questions about installing an EHR and activating a patient portal for your practice. Once you have a better idea of how patient portals can empower your staff as well as your patients, you’ll be on your way toward deploying one in your organization.

Key Takeaway:

  • Electronic health record or EHR software enables you to activate a special patient portal.
  • A patient portal is a great way to let patients access their own information on demand.
  • One con to keep in mind with patient portals is that some patients may not have much experience with computers, preventing them from getting the most out of it.
  • Another drawback is the potential for data breaches, so you’ll need to work with a vendor that provides robust, secure EHR software.
  • Patients will appreciate being able to check into the system to set an appointment or request a prescription refill.
  • Your staff will waste less time because patients can leave them electronic messages via the portal, instead of having to stop what they are doing to respond to a call.
  • Patients find it liberating to gain more access to their lab test results through the portal, rather than waiting for the report to come by surface mail or a phone call from the physician.
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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6 Ways Health Informatics Is Transforming Health Care 

6 Ways Health Informatics Is Transforming Health Care  | EHR and Health IT Consulting | Scoop.it

The fact that technology is rapidly transforming health care should come as no surprise to anyone. From robotic arms that perform surgery tonanorobots that deliver drugs through the bloodstream, the days of being tended to by the human country doctor seem to have fully given way to machines and software more in keeping with the tools of Dr. McCoy from “Star Trek.”

 

However, technology’s evolutionary impact on health care isn’t all shooting stars and bells and whistles. Some of health care’s most important changes can slip beneath the radar due to their more pedestrian presentation, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t just as revolutionary as mini robots zipping through veins. Take the burgeoning field of health informatics, for example. A specialization that combines communications, information technology, and health care to improve patient care, it’s at the forefront of the current technological shift in medicine. Here are six ways it’s already transforming health care.

 

1. Dramatic Savings

Health care isn’t just expensive; it’s wasteful. It’s estimated that half of all medical expenditures are squandered on account of repeat procedures, the expenses associated with more traditional methods of sharing information, delays in care, errors in care or delivery, and the like. With an electronic and connected system in place, much of that waste can be curbed. From lab results that reach their destination sooner improving better an more timely care delivery to reduced malpractice claims, health informatics reduces errors, increases communication, and drives efficiency where before there was costly incompetence and obstruction.

 

2. Shared Knowledge

There’s a reason medicine is referred to as a “practice,” and it’s because health care providers are always learning more and honing their skills. Health informatics provides a way for knowledge about patients, diseases, therapies, medicines, and the like to be more easily shared. As knowledge is more readily passed back and forth between providers and patients, the practice of medicine gets better — something that aids everyone within the chain of care, from hospital administrators and physicians to pharmacists and patients.

 

3. Patient Participation

When patients have electronic access to their own health history and recommendations, it empowers them to take their role in their own health care more seriously. Patients who have access to care portals are able to educate themselves more effectively about their diagnoses and prognoses, while also keeping better track of medications and symptoms. They are also able to interact with doctors and nurses more easily, which yields better outcomes, as well. Health informatics allows individuals to feel like they are a valuable part of their own health care team, because they are.

 

4. The Impersonalization of Care

One criticism of approaching patient care through information and technology is that care is becoming less and less personal. Instead of a doctor getting to know a patient in real time and space in order to best offer care, the job of “knowing” is placed on data and algorithms.

 

As data is gathered regarding a patient, algorithms can be used to sort it in order to determine what is wrong and what care should be offered. It remains to be seen what effects this data-driven approach will have over time, but regardless, since care is getting less personal, having a valid and accurate record that the patient and his care providers can access remains vital.  

 

5. Increased Coordination

Health care is getting more and more specialized, which means most patients receive care from as many as a dozen different people in one hospital stay. This increase in specialists requires an increase in coordination, and it’s health informatics that provides the way forward. Pharmaceutical concerns, blood levels, nutrition, physical therapy, X-rays, discharge instructions — it’s astonishing how many different conversations a single patient may have with a team of people regarding care, and unless those conversations and efforts are made in tandem with one another, problems will arise and care will suffer. Health informatics makes the necessary

coordination possible.  

 

6. Improved Outcomes

The most important way in which informatics is changing health care is in improved outcomes. Electronic medical records result in higher quality care and safer care as coordinated teams provide better diagnoses and decrease the chance for errors. Doctors and nurses are able to increase efficiency, which frees up time to spend with patients, and previously manual jobs and tasks are automated, which saves time and money — not just for hospitals, clinics, and providers, but for patients, insurance companies, and state and federal governments, too.  

 

Health care is undergoing a massive renovation thanks to technology, and health informatics is helping to ensure that part of the change results in greater efficiency, coordination, and improved care.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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